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HDMI Cables and Lightning!

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  • HDTV
  • TV
  • Cable
  • HDMI
  • Home Theatre
Last response: in Home Theatre
June 20, 2010 1:38:34 PM

Last night we had lightning strike our house or extremely close to the house, not exactly sure yet. But anyway 2 TV's were on but lost input when the lightning struck. After doing some testing and screwing around we figured that the HDMI cables are no longer working. The TV's are fine and were just using AVI right now.

Anyone heard of this happening?

More about : hdmi cables lightning

a b x TV
June 21, 2010 1:03:56 AM

Some of the circuitry in the TVs may be lunched. AVI works but HDMI does not. What happens when you use a new HDMI cable?
June 21, 2010 1:54:06 PM

Well we solved the problem. The output on our stereo system for the HDMI cables must have fried. We figured out that it came up through the phone line since we discovered our phone was not working. That's why there was no surge protection because it was through the phone line.
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April 18, 2011 6:24:50 PM

Just thought I'd add my experience for others who have had their HDMI ports blow out due to a nearby lightning strike. It happened to me. My belief is that whatever charge the lightning generated somehow traveled through my DirecTV dish, passed through both the DirecTV receiver box and my AV receiver and landed on my 50" Panasonic plasma HDMI board. I googled for Panasonic repair and found a web site that offered TV repairman answers to your questions. I paid $17 and correctly got the part number I needed. I bought it online from ShopJimmy for $150, got it a week later and installed it myself. After talking with local TV repair shops, I estimated it would have cost me over $450 and loss of my TV for over a week. Now I am in the market for a surge protector that includes a coaxial input.
July 30, 2011 4:12:03 AM

bmesc said:
Just thought I'd add my experience for others who have had their HDMI ports blow out due to a nearby lightning strike. It happened to me. My belief is that whatever charge the lightning generated somehow traveled through my DirecTV dish, passed through both the DirecTV receiver box and my AV receiver and landed on my 50" Panasonic plasma HDMI board. I googled for Panasonic repair and found a web site that offered TV repairman answers to your questions. I paid $17 and correctly got the part number I needed. I bought it online from ShopJimmy for $150, got it a week later and installed it myself. After talking with local TV repair shops, I estimated it would have cost me over $450 and loss of my TV for over a week. Now I am in the market for a surge protector that includes a coaxial input.




i had the same thing happen to mine. lighting came in through the directv and fried the dvr and the tv 50'' panasonic. i just took the back off and its burnt. can you tell me the part #

please email me @ personal information blasted into a million rainbows.
July 30, 2011 5:21:09 AM

the tv is a plasma and its burnt at the port where the hdmi was pluged in.
July 30, 2011 5:22:48 AM

the tv is a plasma and its burnt at the port where the hdmi was pluged in.
September 11, 2011 11:56:41 PM

I my case the Sony Bravia LCD 40 inch will no even turn on - see no lights whatsoever. It was plugged into surge protector along with HDTV cable box, which no longer works, but other things plugged into the same surge protector work. I know either lightening hit the cable splitter outside my house or too much rain got to a loose connection - either way we heard a long noise and then some of the electricity went out as well as the cable to several TVs, those the cable boxes work, the TVs will not turn on any longer.
September 12, 2011 7:07:42 AM

always check your cables first!
September 12, 2011 4:33:00 PM

01bush said:
i had the same thing happen to mine. lighting came in through the directv and fried the dvr and the tv 50'' panasonic. i just took the back off and its burnt. can you tell me the part #

please email me @ personal information blasted into a million rainbows.


Sorry I did not see there was a reply to my post when you sent it. Hope you figured it out. I don't have the part# offhand, but I think your best bet is to research the model number to find the part# because they may be different for different models.

I have been using the set with no problems since I replaced the part, but ever since then, the TV picture (only) will go black for about 2 seconds maybe a couple of times over 3 hours or so. Annoying, but otherwise it looks good.
October 16, 2012 11:55:55 PM

I had the same happen to me, it blew out my AV Receiver, DVD player and 55"Samsung LED TV. I replaced the Receiver and DVD players and the mainboard on my TV. You can find the part number on the mainboard. I googoled it and found it at DiscountTVparts.com for about $150. It was an easy replacement.
April 26, 2013 7:21:24 PM

Sony Bravia TV's have an on board fuse which often blows with local lightning, need to take back cover off, look at PCB near mains connections.
I replaced a fuse and all was fine again.

avisjohn said:
I my case the Sony Bravia LCD 40 inch will no even turn on - see no lights whatsoever. It was plugged into surge protector along with HDTV cable box, which no longer works, but other things plugged into the same surge protector work. I know either lightening hit the cable splitter outside my house or too much rain got to a loose connection - either way we heard a long noise and then some of the electricity went out as well as the cable to several TVs, those the cable boxes work, the TVs will not turn on any longer.


October 4, 2014 2:06:28 PM

Just had a similar problem on 10/03/2014. The problem obviously comes in through the satellite cable. I lost HDMI cable output ports from my Scepter 40", Viore 24",and Vizio 55" TVs. There was no direct strike so it had to be transient static electricity from a lightning strike in the near vicinity. All of my computers and TV power inputs are protected with high quality surge protectors and they are still fully functional. The only damage was to the HDMI TV input ports. I also lost my internet connection through AT&T but their systems fuses at the main box blew which kept any surge from reaching my computers. Is there a fuse set up that could be installed between the coax cable and the boxes that would blow at a low enough voltage to protect the TVs. It is a shame to spend more than the TVs cost to repair the HDMI board. This repair will be cost prohibitive for me and will actually be cheaper to replace the TVs in most instances than to repair..
April 30, 2015 8:08:48 AM

zach attack said:
Last night we had lightning strike our house or extremely close to the house, not exactly sure yet. But anyway 2 TV's were on but lost input when the lightning struck. After doing some testing and screwing around we figured that the HDMI cables are no longer working. The TV's are fine and were just using AVI right now.

Anyone heard of this happening?


Lightning strike took out all HDMI inputs on my ground floor that had a cable connected, whether powered on or not.
My home theater receiver, TV monitor, and network hub, connected to it were all fried (there were arc marks around the HDMI connection on the TV). The cable modem connected to the fried network hub was fried as well as the cable company's splitter at the side of the house. Ground floor computer connected to cable modem port had motherboard and display board fried with the DVI inputs blown on the attached monitor. Additionally cat-5 connected whole house audio flamed out and all electronic components are toast. Second floor computers, networks, etc all okay.

Also several neighbors had HDMI inputs to their TVs blown.

HDMI is obviously not rugged to Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP). What a risk!
I'm avoiding HDMI wherever possible.
October 26, 2015 9:10:57 AM

01bush said:
bmesc said:
Just thought I'd add my experience for others who have had their HDMI ports blow out due to a nearby lightning strike. It happened to me. My belief is that whatever charge the lightning generated somehow traveled through my DirecTV dish, passed through both the DirecTV receiver box and my AV receiver and landed on my 50" Panasonic plasma HDMI board. I googled for Panasonic repair and found a web site that offered TV repairman answers to your questions. I paid $17 and correctly got the part number I needed. I bought it online from ShopJimmy for $150, got it a week later and installed it myself. After talking with local TV repair shops, I estimated it would have cost me over $450 and loss of my TV for over a week. Now I am in the market for a surge protector that includes a coaxial input.




i had the same thing happen to mine. lighting came in through the directv and fried the dvr and the tv 50'' panasonic. i just took the back off and its burnt. can you tell me the part #

please email me @ personal information blasted into a million rainbows.


October 26, 2015 9:13:45 AM

I live in Waco, TX and Friday we had a terrible power outage and the dish tech said that my HDMI port is out. Is this the same thing that happened to you and you said you were able to repair it yourself. Are you a service tech and was it very hard? Was it the whole board? I am afraid that if I get the part that I will not be able to have the right equipment to repair it. Can you give me some details on what you had to do? Appreciate your help.
October 27, 2015 8:33:40 AM

mscamry2 said:
I live in Waco, TX and Friday we had a terrible power outage and the dish tech said that my HDMI port is out. Is this the same thing that happened to you and you said you were able to repair it yourself. Are you a service tech and was it very hard?

Your answer is unique to each TV. Often the HDMI port is now part of one big main board. You might open it to learn.

Two problems exist. First is to fix the TV. Second is to learn why and eliminate future damage. OP only assumed why damage happened. And got it wrong. All phone lines already have effective protection installed for free. You probably had damage for similar reasons.

A surge is maybe a lightning strike to wires far down the street. That is a direct strike incoming to every household appliance. But electricity (a surge) only does damage when both an incoming and outgoing path exist. Only damaged are appliances that also had a better outgoing path to earth. In your case, that outgoing path is easy - HDMI port.

HDMI port connects to equipment (ie satellite box) that connects to what is already surge protected. Surge protection is always about a connection to earth. So a best outgoing path is HDMI port, via satellite dish to earth ground.

Incoming on AC mains. Outgoing to earth via HDMI port. Damage is often on an outgoing path.

Lightning was all but invited to hunt for earth via appliances because a 'whole house' protector was not properly earthed on AC mains. Protection must be where a surge enters the building. Otherwise a surge will go hunting for earth destructive via appliances.

A second scenario is possible because so many dish installers fail to properly surge protect (earth) the dish and the cable where it enters the building. It must enter within feet of the same single point earth ground used by AC electric and phone.

HDMI ports (the outgoing path) tend to be easy victims when a 'whole house' solution is not properly earthed on AC mains.
January 6, 2016 5:35:58 AM

Hi, this exact same situation happened to myself I was wondering which circuit board did they tell you needed to be replaced I am going to try to fix the problem myself also any help will be grateful thanks
May 29, 2016 6:08:11 PM

HAVE ISOLATED TEMP CONTROLLED SOLDERING IRON DESIGNED FOR SURFACE MOUNT - CAN'T WAIT TO USE IT. :-) :-) :-)

I had this problem nearly 3 years back, bought a new main board and that fixed my Panasonic TC-P42ST30 plasma TV. Today another close by lightening strike, nothing except the same TV was damaged. When these lightening strikes occur I only seem to lose the HDMI port that runs to my cable box. I moved the same HDMI cable to another HDMI port on the TV and all is working again.

ANYONE KNOW WHAT IS BEING BLOWN OUT ON THE PANASONIC TV MAIN BOARD? If we could nail this question down I would bet one tiny surface mount component is the culprit that is going bad. When we identify the component(s) on the main board that go out it would not be surprising to find that one or a very few component parts can be replaced for next to nothing, mostly time and solder skill.

WHO IS THE ENGINEER OR ELECTRONICS TECH THAT CAN SOLVE THIS QUESTION. I can not wait and it will make a lot of Panasonic owners very happy I would think! :-) EDIT: Today was the fourth lightening strike that took out an HDMI port on the TV. Each strike occurred weeks or months apart and they only blow out the TV HDMI port with the cable going to my BrightHouse cable box. Something on the Panasonic main board controlling only one HDMI port is very delicate when it comes to very small static discharges. I need to know what component it might be. Based upon my experience with this problem I believe the component(s) are located in the HDMI port circuit before the input signal is processed after passing through the specific affected HDMI port circuit.

EDIT: --->>> PROBELM SOLVED, I HAVE POSTED WHERE THE PROBLEM IS LOCATED AND HOW IT CAN BE REPAIRED WITHOUT PURCHASING A NEW MAIN BOARD.
May 29, 2016 6:42:14 PM

zach attack said:
Last night we had lightning strike our house or extremely close to the house, not exactly sure yet. But anyway 2 TV's were on but lost input when the lightning struck. After doing some testing and screwing around we figured that the HDMI cables are no longer working. The TV's are fine and were just using AVI right now.

Anyone heard of this happening?


ZACK, when it comes to Panasonic plasma 3D TV's I can assure you it is not the HDMI cable that is always affected. After 4 lightening strikes over more than 4 years I have lost only the TV's HDMI port that is connected to my cable TV box. Everything else in the house is fine, just the single HDMI port on TV goes out.
May 29, 2016 6:42:14 PM

zach attack said:
Last night we had lightning strike our house or extremely close to the house, not exactly sure yet. But anyway 2 TV's were on but lost input when the lightning struck. After doing some testing and screwing around we figured that the HDMI cables are no longer working. The TV's are fine and were just using AVI right now.

Anyone heard of this happening?


ZACK, when it comes to Panasonic plasma 3D TV's I can assure you it is not the HDMI cable that is always affected. After 4 lightening strikes over more than 4 years I have lost only the TV's HDMI port that is connected to my cable TV box. Everything else in the house is fine, just the single HDMI port on TV goes out.
May 29, 2016 8:02:13 PM

n9zn said:
HAVE ISOLATED TEMP CONTROLLED SOLDERING IRON DESIGNED FOR SURFACE MOUNT - CAN'T WAIT TO USE IT. :-) :-) :-)

I had this problem nearly 3 years back, bought a new main board and that fixed my Panasonic TC-P42ST30 plasma TV. Today another close by lightening strike, nothing except the same TV was damaged. When these lightening strikes occur I only seem to lose the HDMI port that runs to my cable box. I moved the same HDMI cable to another HDMI port on the TV and all is working again.

ANYONE KNOW WHAT IS BEING BLOWN OUT ON THE PANASONIC TV MAIN BOARD? If we could nail this question down I would bet one tiny surface mount component is the culprit that is going bad. When we identify the component(s) on the main board that go out it would not be surprising to find that one or a very few component parts can be replaced for next to nothing, mostly time and solder skill.

WHO IS THE ENGINEER OR ELECTRONICS TECH THAT CAN SOLVE THIS QUESTION. I can not wait and it will make a lot of Panasonic owners very happy I would think! :-) EDIT: Today was the fourth lightening strike that took out an HDMI port on the TV. Each strike occurred weeks or months apart and they only blow out the TV HDMI port with the cable going to my BrightHouse cable box. Something on the Panasonic main board controlling only one HDMI port is very delicate when it comes to very small static discharges. I need to know what component it might be. Based upon my experience with this problem I believe the component(s) are located in the HDMI port circuit before the input signal is processed after passing through the specific affected HDMI port circuit.


May 29, 2016 8:05:39 PM

Believe it or not I still have not fixed my TV from that lightning strike. I did purchase a main board where the power cable is located but it still is not working. I believe it is the HDMI board but I cannot find that board to save my life. Thanks for the answer though and yes I am waiting for the person that can answer our problem.
May 30, 2016 6:12:19 PM

Arthur_1975 said:
Believe it or not I still have not fixed my TV from that lightning strike. I did purchase a main board where the power cable is located but it still is not working. I believe it is the HDMI board but I cannot find that board to save my life. Thanks for the answer though and yes I am waiting for the person that can answer our problem.


This is nearly certainly an HDMI problem. HDMI and AVI usually are both on the TV "main" or often called "A" board (the board may have the HDMI connectors on it or you can follow a cable from an HDMI connector to the board inside the set). HDMI passes through a different area of the board than does AVI signals. I have been searching to see if anyone knows which tiny surface mount component is being blown out from lightening ESD. If I can find that answer for my Panasonic TC-P42ST30 plasma TV I will be able to fix the board for a few pennies when this occurs in the future.

ZACK, take a look at MY post following this one IT EXPALINS EXACTLY WHAT IS HAPPENING TO YOUR TV and HOW TO REPAIR IT.
June 3, 2016 8:53:54 PM

THE SIMPLE TRUTH ABOUT HDMI PANASONIC PORTS BECOMING INOPERABLE, HDMI signal processing and Electro Static Discharge (ESD)! (THE BEST PART is that this explanation of the HDMI Panasonic problem applies to many devices produced by nearly every company that process incoming HDMI signals prior to sending them on the other areas of a device for additional handling or display.)



I have an excellent Panasonic Plasma TV and I have watched 4 HDMI ports stop working from Electro Static Discharge (ESD) over a period of 5 years. Each time I get an ESD to the TV it comes through the cable box and destroys only the HDMI port on my TV connected to the TV cable providers box. All other HDMI ports are unaffected by the ESD.



I realized the problem area is isolated to a multi pin IC chip on the TV main board also known as the A board, it is the IC chip at the opposite end of the short HDMI buss circuit from the HDMI connector connection to the IC chip that process incoming HDMI signals for distribution elsewhere in the device. No matter if this is a TV, Blue Ray Disc recorder, Projector, Computer or any other device receiving and using HDMI signals internally there is usually a multi-pin IC chip whose purpose is to control HDMI signal timing and processing.



This chip can be replaced if you can locate a replacement chip manufacturer, you will need to patiently search the internet for the chip part number on the chip. Manufacture's are nearly guaranteed to not have these IC's available as a stand alone part. Some chips may be difficult to locate, if you can not locate a replacement chip the PCB board containing this chip will need to be replaced. There is no known practical method to repair defective IC chip internal circuitry.



Replacement of a defective or blown SM IC chip is relatively easy for those who work on SM PCB boards and have the proper equipment. Even those without all of the SM equipment used by companies offering this kind of service can be successful but this requires creativity, a very steady hand, patience and attention to producing high quality work.



Replacing the chip involves, taping off the surrounding area, heating the old IC chip via heated air gun and carefully lifting it from the board. This procedure is delicate because you do not want to damage surrounding components or thermal shock any part of the PCB or components. Temperatures must be raised in increments allowing the PCB and components to acclimate to the small increment rise in temperature before applying more heat. If you do not do this the board may pop corn and components will almost certainly be thermal shocked resulting in an inoperative PCB board.



You can find any number of videos on YouTube detailing how to replace multi-pin IC chips on a SM PCB board. If you are going to purchase a replacement main board to repair the problem and are skilled soldering you may want to try replacing the offending component yourself. If you are successful you saved yourself from having to buy another main board. If your not successful you gained some delicate soldering experience on SMT boards and will have to order the replacement main board to fix the HDMI inputs.



AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN A POUND OF CURE. It makes no difference how you repair your bad HDMI ports. The only way to help avoid repeat occurrences of HDMI port in-operability is to purchase and properly install a high quality HDMI ESD and Voltage surge protector. A search of Amazon, E-Bay or Google will reveal a number of devices that will help prevent future damage to HDMI port circuits.
July 13, 2016 5:10:07 AM

It just happened to us....and I found this forum while trying to find out what happened. The lightning got the phone company's modem, our phone, blue ray player, and the HDMI ports on the TV. My question or solution: replacement equipment where possible will be wireless(computers, printers, blu ray player and/or TV) so future strikes may get the wireless router, but downstream equipment will be protected??
July 25, 2016 3:17:52 PM

Same here. Lightning strike took out the main video processor board on 60' Visio. Good thing I can find these on Ebay for $30. This is the second I replaced. First time just lost the TV. A couple weeks ago we had a closer hit and it took the TV and everything else that was connected to it via HDMI. All the devices fired up, just no HDMI output. Dish Hopper DVR (Component output worked fine), AppleTV box, and Sony PS4. Obviously HDMI is extremely susceptible to Lightning and/or associated ESD.