Apparent bug in XP SP2 filename search from Windows Explorer

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hiyas. It looks to me like I've found a very crude bug in XP SP2. When
doing a filename search in Windows Explorer, if you type the entire
filename of a valid file in the input field labeled "All or part of the
file name:", the search will *not* hit the existing file of that name.

This seems to be true only if the filename contains the standard period
followed by the standard 3 character filename extension. If you search,
for example, from the root of C: for the file "ntldr", you'll get a hit
on it as expected. But if you search for, say, "boot.ini" from the same
starting point, you'll get no hits though the file is sitting right
there at C:\boot.ini .

Search on the complete filename of any file you know to be on your disk
and that has a filename extension- you'll get no hit.

Can somebody please reproduce this? I've tried it on 3 PCs in my home
network and all had the apparent bug. But maybe there's something
whacked about the way I configure machines, so I'd like to hear from
somebody out there.

--
wsk
8 answers Last reply
More about apparent filename search windows explorer
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Hmmm, thanks Mak and Stanley. I assumed Search was including "hidden"
    files because I long ago turned off all hiding in the View/Options area
    and applied it to all folders. Didn't think I would have to specify it
    again for Search... And yet, a few weeks ago my son was here and we
    were searching for mp3 files using entire name and again we were
    getting no hits when the files clearly existed. And when are mp3's ever
    considered "system files"?... Well in any case it looks unique to my
    machines. Sorry for false alarm.

    --
    wsk
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Mak wrote:
    > for mp3 case, make sure 'Search subfolders' option is enabled.
    > or, to be sure (it seems you have problems configuring search), use command
    > dir with appropreate options and redirect output to a file. For example:
    > start | run | cmd | enter
    > type:
    > dir c:\*.mp3 /a /s > c:\mymp3files.txt
    >
    > then open mymp3files.txt in notepad
    >
    > <wskrispy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    > news:1122615575.972234.151820@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > > Hmmm, thanks Mak and Stanley. I assumed Search was including "hidden"
    > > files because I long ago turned off all hiding in the View/Options area
    > > and applied it to all folders. Didn't think I would have to specify it
    > > again for Search... And yet, a few weeks ago my son was here and we
    > > were searching for mp3 files using entire name and again we were
    > > getting no hits when the files clearly existed. And when are mp3's ever
    > > considered "system files"?... Well in any case it looks unique to my
    > > machines. Sorry for false alarm.
    > >
    > > --
    > > wsk
    > >

    Mak, I'm not as beginner-ish as it may look. I indeed tried the dir
    [path] /s command a few weeks ago and still no hit. And get this-- in
    all these cases if a partial filename with wildcard was searched on,
    hits were returned. If these unchecked advanced options were the
    culprit in all cases, no hits should ever have been made... I'll look
    into it more and try to nail it down tomorrow.

    --
    wsk
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    wskrispy wrote:
    > Hiyas. It looks to me like I've found a very crude bug in XP SP2. When
    > doing a filename search in Windows Explorer, if you type the entire
    > filename of a valid file in the input field labeled "All or part of
    > the file name:", the search will *not* hit the existing file of that
    > name.
    >
    > This seems to be true only if the filename contains the standard
    > period followed by the standard 3 character filename extension. If
    > you search, for example, from the root of C: for the file "ntldr",
    > you'll get a hit on it as expected. But if you search for, say,
    > "boot.ini" from the same starting point, you'll get no hits though
    > the file is sitting right there at C:\boot.ini .
    >
    > Search on the complete filename of any file you know to be on your
    > disk and that has a filename extension- you'll get no hit.
    >
    > Can somebody please reproduce this? I've tried it on 3 PCs in my home
    > network and all had the apparent bug. But maybe there's something
    > whacked about the way I configure machines, so I'd like to hear from
    > somebody out there.

    Windows Explorer, My Computer or just "Search" and put in the filename
    "boot.ini" (since that was your example) and found it right off.
    Of course my hidden files/system files are turned off and I have setup the
    advanced search features for system folders/hidden files and
    folders/subfolders as well..

    --
    Shenan Stanley
    MS-MVP
    --
    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Thanks Torgeir and Mak, but how do you explain this: in my original
    post I mentioned that c:\ntldr was returning a hit with full filename
    specified, while c:\boot.ini was not. Ntldr is as much a "system" and
    "hidden" file as boot.ini, so whatever checkboxes happen to be checked
    or unchecked, Search behavior should be the same for these two files,
    wouldn't you say? Yet only one was detected by the search. It seemed to
    have something to do with presence or absence of filename extension.

    --
    wsk
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    blasto543@yahoo.com wrote:

    > Mak wrote:
    >
    >>for mp3 case, make sure 'Search subfolders' option is enabled.
    >>or, to be sure (it seems you have problems configuring search), use command
    >>dir with appropreate options and redirect output to a file. For example:
    >>start | run | cmd | enter
    >>type:
    >>dir c:\*.mp3 /a /s > c:\mymp3files.txt
    >>
    >>then open mymp3files.txt in notepad
    >
    >
    > Mak, I'm not as beginner-ish as it may look. I indeed tried the dir
    > [path] /s command a few weeks ago and still no hit. And get this-- in
    > all these cases if a partial filename with wildcard was searched on,
    > hits were returned. If these unchecked advanced options were the
    > culprit in all cases, no hits should ever have been made... I'll look
    > into it more and try to nail it down tomorrow.
    >
    Hi,

    The dir command doesn't care about the settings you have set under
    advanced options for Search.

    To include hidden and system files when using dir, use dir /a (as
    Mak did).


    --
    torgeir, Microsoft MVP Scripting and WMI, Porsgrunn Norway
    Administration scripting examples and an ONLINE version of
    the 1328 page Scripting Guide:
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/scriptcenter/default.mspx
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    ... and what would happen if you click on 'More advanced options', then tick
    'Search hidden files and folders' and do a search for your boot.ini file
    again?
    <wskrispy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    news:1122613018.397112.291590@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > Hiyas. It looks to me like I've found a very crude bug in XP SP2. When
    > doing a filename search in Windows Explorer, if you type the entire
    > filename of a valid file in the input field labeled "All or part of the
    > file name:", the search will *not* hit the existing file of that name.
    >
    > This seems to be true only if the filename contains the standard period
    > followed by the standard 3 character filename extension. If you search,
    > for example, from the root of C: for the file "ntldr", you'll get a hit
    > on it as expected. But if you search for, say, "boot.ini" from the same
    > starting point, you'll get no hits though the file is sitting right
    > there at C:\boot.ini .
    >
    > Search on the complete filename of any file you know to be on your disk
    > and that has a filename extension- you'll get no hit.
    >
    > Can somebody please reproduce this? I've tried it on 3 PCs in my home
    > network and all had the apparent bug. But maybe there's something
    > whacked about the way I configure machines, so I'd like to hear from
    > somebody out there.
    >
    > --
    > wsk
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    for mp3 case, make sure 'Search subfolders' option is enabled.
    or, to be sure (it seems you have problems configuring search), use command
    dir with appropreate options and redirect output to a file. For example:
    start | run | cmd | enter
    type:
    dir c:\*.mp3 /a /s > c:\mymp3files.txt

    then open mymp3files.txt in notepad

    <wskrispy@optonline.net> wrote in message
    news:1122615575.972234.151820@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > Hmmm, thanks Mak and Stanley. I assumed Search was including "hidden"
    > files because I long ago turned off all hiding in the View/Options area
    > and applied it to all folders. Didn't think I would have to specify it
    > again for Search... And yet, a few weeks ago my son was here and we
    > were searching for mp3 files using entire name and again we were
    > getting no hits when the files clearly existed. And when are mp3's ever
    > considered "system files"?... Well in any case it looks unique to my
    > machines. Sorry for false alarm.
    >
    > --
    > wsk
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    wsk,

    Before any explanations can be tried:


    Is this odd behaviour you claim you see on a number of your computers
    reproducible?


    What view do you select for search results? Can you change view to 'Details'
    and make sure search result for 'ntldr' returns root of your system drive
    c:\ntldr and not an OEM folder c:\i386\ntldr for example, where this file is
    neither system or hidden.


    <blasto543@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1122649349.688005.267860@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > Thanks Torgeir and Mak, but how do you explain this: in my original
    > post I mentioned that c:\ntldr was returning a hit with full filename
    > specified, while c:\boot.ini was not. Ntldr is as much a "system" and
    > "hidden" file as boot.ini, so whatever checkboxes happen to be checked
    > or unchecked, Search behavior should be the same for these two files,
    > wouldn't you say? Yet only one was detected by the search. It seemed to
    > have something to do with presence or absence of filename extension.
    >
    > --
    > wsk
    >
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