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(Paint) Speed painting Marines

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Anonymous
August 30, 2005 12:38:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

I've researched this topic extensivley, as I'm tired of laboring over each
and every mini. I have found a few methods that seem to work well, but I
wanted to get your opinion on how to speed paint a SM tact/assault/etc.
squad neatly and with good "arms' length" table appearence. I was going to
try the following:
1) After building and basing, prime chaos black
2) base coat all of model w/ GW ultramarines blue spray paint
3) Let dry. Give wash of 1:1 black/blue inks. 5:1 water to ink.
4) medium drybrush armor w/ regal or enchanted blue
5) repaint chest emblem chaos black, paint shining gold, light drybrush
mithril silver
6) stick on weapons and backpacks. med. drybrush them boltgun, then light
drybrush of chainmail
7) paint eyes, pouches, base, etc.


So, what are your opinions? Anyway I could speed this up or improve the
process?

thanks

drgrbek
Anonymous
August 30, 2005 8:23:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

In article <df1uhd$2i4$1@gnus01.u.washington.edu>, Ryan Elkins,
relkins@u.washington.edu Varfed out the following in Timo speak...
> I've researched this topic extensivley, as I'm tired of laboring over each
> and every mini. I have found a few methods that seem to work well, but I
> wanted to get your opinion on how to speed paint a SM tact/assault/etc.
> squad neatly and with good "arms' length" table appearence. I was going to
> try the following:
> 1) After building and basing, prime chaos black

Remember to clean your minis before primering them. A good
degreasing dish detergent or a bleach based cleaner like clorox spray or
even Fantastic spray cleaner works well to get off any mold release
agents and finger oils still on the minis. Also - save some of the
plastic sprue if possible and test your spray primer on the sprue before
using it on your good minis. There's always the possibility of one
batch of paint/plastic being different and having a solvent reaction -
find out on the sprue and not on the minis.

> 2) base coat all of model w/ GW ultramarines blue spray paint

If you're going to do spray on base coat which will pretty much
cover your primer coat and then an ink wash, there's no point in using
black primer unless that's all you've got. In this case I'd recommend a
white base primer as it'll make your blue look better (more light will
reflect back from the white primer base making your blue look
brighter/stronger in hue).

> 3) Let dry. Give wash of 1:1 black/blue inks. 5:1 water to ink.

Whatever ink wash formula works - and if it isn't dark enough the
first time you can always apply another wash to specific areas to darken
them up.

> 4) medium drybrush armor w/ regal or enchanted blue

Sounds good, as simply adding white to any color makes it a more
'pastel' color rather than resulting in a lighter hue of the same color.

> 5) repaint chest emblem chaos black, paint shining gold, light drybrush
> mithril silver
> 6) stick on weapons and backpacks. med. drybrush them boltgun, then light
> drybrush of chainmail

Obviously you can primer these black separately from the rest of the
mini. If you've never tried it - there's a really handy tool called
'masking fluid' that water color artists use a lot to protect areas from
getting paint on them. Masking fluid is like a thin rubbery
paint/rubber cement that can be brushed onto specific parts of your
mini. When it dries it forms a rubbery barrier that can be
primered/painted over and then removed later leaving a clean surface for
gluing parts together - or it can be applied over existing paint to
protect an area from spray/mistakes, etc. I use it when I'm primering
minis to protect the areas where I want to glue parts together since I
usually only partly assemble my minis before painting them and then
gluing the parts together.


> 7) paint eyes, pouches, base, etc.
>

Hope that helps,

Myrmidon

--
"Conan, what is best in life?"
"To paint your miniatures, to see them driven before you on the table,
and to hear the lamentation of the cheese-mongers!"

- Del Webb

RGMW FAQ: http://www.rgmw.org

Or...

http://www.sheppard.demon.co.uk/rgmw_faq/rgmw_faq.htm
Anonymous
August 30, 2005 8:23:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

>> 1) After building and basing, prime chaos black
>
> Remember to clean your minis before primering them. A good
> degreasing dish detergent or a bleach based cleaner like clorox spray or
> even Fantastic spray cleaner works well to get off any mold release
> agents and finger oils still on the minis. Also - save some of the
> plastic sprue if possible and test your spray primer on the sprue before
> using it on your good minis. There's always the possibility of one
> batch of paint/plastic being different and having a solvent reaction -
> find out on the sprue and not on the minis.
I alwaysd o this w/ my metal minis. Old tooth brush and a drop of dish soap
works great. And I've never had any problem painting plastic minis "out of
the box" w/o cleaning.
>
>> 2) base coat all of model w/ GW ultramarines blue spray paint
>
> If you're going to do spray on base coat which will pretty much
> cover your primer coat and then an ink wash, there's no point in using
> black primer unless that's all you've got. In this case I'd recommend a
> white base primer as it'll make your blue look better (more light will
> reflect back from the white primer base making your blue look
> brighter/stronger in hue).
Thanks for the tip. I tend to like the darker look that a black basecoat
gives my SM minis.
>
>> 3) Let dry. Give wash of 1:1 black/blue inks. 5:1 water to ink.
>
> Whatever ink wash formula works - and if it isn't dark enough the
> first time you can always apply another wash to specific areas to darken
> them up.
>
>> 4) medium drybrush armor w/ regal or enchanted blue
>
> Sounds good, as simply adding white to any color makes it a more
> 'pastel' color rather than resulting in a lighter hue of the same color.
>
>> 5) repaint chest emblem chaos black, paint shining gold, light drybrush
>> mithril silver
>> 6) stick on weapons and backpacks. med. drybrush them boltgun, then light
>> drybrush of chainmail
>
> Obviously you can primer these black separately from the rest of the
> mini. If you've never tried it - there's a really handy tool called
> 'masking fluid' that water color artists use a lot to protect areas from
> getting paint on them. Masking fluid is like a thin rubbery
> paint/rubber cement that can be brushed onto specific parts of your
> mini. When it dries it forms a rubbery barrier that can be
> primered/painted over and then removed later leaving a clean surface for
> gluing parts together - or it can be applied over existing paint to
> protect an area from spray/mistakes, etc. I use it when I'm primering
> minis to protect the areas where I want to glue parts together since I
> usually only partly assemble my minis before painting them and then
> gluing the parts together.
I'm going to try the masking fluid! One part that always drove me nuts was
touching everything up. I'll let you know how this works.
>
>
>> 7) paint eyes, pouches, base, etc.
>>
>
> Hope that helps,
>
> Myrmidon
>
> --
> "Conan, what is best in life?"
> "To paint your miniatures, to see them driven before you on the table,
> and to hear the lamentation of the cheese-mongers!"
>
> - Del Webb
>
> RGMW FAQ: http://www.rgmw.org
>
> Or...
>
> http://www.sheppard.demon.co.uk/rgmw_faq/rgmw_faq.htm
Related resources
Anonymous
August 31, 2005 12:23:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

In article <df22vj$6jq$1@gnus01.u.washington.edu>,
relkins@u.washington.edu says...
> >> 1) After building and basing, prime chaos black
> >
> > Remember to clean your minis before primering them. A good
> > degreasing dish detergent or a bleach based cleaner like clorox spray or
> > even Fantastic spray cleaner works well to get off any mold release
> > agents and finger oils still on the minis. Also - save some of the
> > plastic sprue if possible and test your spray primer on the sprue before
> > using it on your good minis. There's always the possibility of one
> > batch of paint/plastic being different and having a solvent reaction -
> > find out on the sprue and not on the minis.

> I alwaysd o this w/ my metal minis. Old tooth brush and a drop of dish soap
> works great. And I've never had any problem painting plastic minis "out of
> the box" w/o cleaning.

Well, the plastics are the ones that have the tendency to have
problems with the solvents in spray paints so I always err on the side of
caution when it comes to making sure they're ready to go.

> >
> >> 2) base coat all of model w/ GW ultramarines blue spray paint
> >
> > If you're going to do spray on base coat which will pretty much
> > cover your primer coat and then an ink wash, there's no point in using
> > black primer unless that's all you've got. In this case I'd recommend a
> > white base primer as it'll make your blue look better (more light will
> > reflect back from the white primer base making your blue look
> > brighter/stronger in hue).
> Thanks for the tip. I tend to like the darker look that a black basecoat
> gives my SM minis.

Cool. This is what I do with my Nids, but I'm finding for my units of
Ultra-smurfs that I like the Blue over White look with the ink wash on
top. Gives them a brighter look and sets them apart from my Blue &
Purple bugs.
<snipage>
> > Obviously you can primer these black separately from the rest of the
> > mini. If you've never tried it - there's a really handy tool called
> > 'masking fluid' that water color artists use a lot to protect areas from
> > getting paint on them. Masking fluid is like a thin rubbery
> > paint/rubber cement that can be brushed onto specific parts of your
> > mini. When it dries it forms a rubbery barrier that can be
> > primered/painted over and then removed later leaving a clean surface for
> > gluing parts together - or it can be applied over existing paint to
> > protect an area from spray/mistakes, etc. I use it when I'm primering
> > minis to protect the areas where I want to glue parts together since I
> > usually only partly assemble my minis before painting them and then
> > gluing the parts together.
> I'm going to try the masking fluid! One part that always drove me nuts was
> touching everything up. I'll let you know how this works.

A few pointers on using masking fluid. It can be thinned with water,
but even cleaning the brushes in water regularly, they'll still gum up
eventually. When I use the masking fluid I tend to use Testors paint
brushes - they've got thick bristles and they survive the masking fluid
and hold their shape a bit better. As for cleaning the brushes - testors
paint thinner works well - let the brush soak in a small amount of it and
the masking fluid will be largely disolved - you'll never get it all out
of the brush, but with a stiff bristle type brush, you can get a lot of
life out of it before it's finally toast. And last but not least -
don't shake up the bottle of masking fluid - it just makes a frothy mess
inside the bottle that's hard to use. If the contents dry out on top,
use a pick or wire to pull the solidify goo out and use the liquid stuff
underneath.

Hope that helps - and good luck with the masking fluid, I love the stuff.

Myrmidon

--
"I'm already impoverished from buying wargames minis,
and I'm too knackered for riotous living..."

-- Moramarth

RGMW FAQ: http://www.rgmw.org

Or...

http://www.sheppard.demon.co.uk/rgmw_faq/rgmw_faq.htm
Anonymous
August 31, 2005 7:33:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

Ryan Elkins wrote:
> I've researched this topic extensivley, as I'm tired of laboring over each
> and every mini.

Huh? Dude, just spray bomb and assembly-line them!

> I have found a few methods that seem to work well, but I
> wanted to get your opinion on how to speed paint a SM tact/assault/etc.
> squad neatly and with good "arms' length" table appearence.

OK, tho practice will also speed production.

> I was going to try the following:
> 1) After building and basing, prime chaos black
> 2) base coat all of model w/ GW ultramarines blue spray paint
> 3) Let dry. Give wash of 1:1 black/blue inks. 5:1 water to ink.

Sure, tho I'd just paint with thinned blue-black paint.

> 4) medium drybrush armor w/ regal or enchanted blue
> 5) repaint chest emblem chaos black, paint shining gold, light drybrush
> mithril silver

I'd skip the back basecolor.

> 6) stick on weapons and backpacks. med. drybrush them boltgun, then light
> drybrush of chainmail

I'd assemble the weapons & backpacks *before* priming, otherwise, you
need to scrape to bare plastic before gluing.

> 7) paint eyes, pouches, base, etc.

Yes.

> So, what are your opinions? Anyway I could speed this up or improve the
> process?

See above. It's OK.

--
--- John Hwang "JohnHwang...@cs.com.no.com"
\-|-/
| A.K.D. F.E.M.C.
| Horned Blood Cross Terror LED Speed Jagd Destiny
Anonymous
August 31, 2005 1:15:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

Ryan wrote on Tue, 30 Aug 2005 08:38:21 -0700:

> 2) base coat all of model w/ GW ultramarines blue spray paint

Unless you've got cans of this already stocked up, you'd be better off
finding an alternative spray or just painting them in UM blue - GW haven't
made UM blue spray (or any colour other than Chaos Black and Skull White)
for well over a year now, in the UK it's rare to find a can of colour on the
shelf in a GW store (and even then it's only in backwater stores that nobody
ever goes to).

Dan
Anonymous
August 31, 2005 3:25:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.miniatures.warhammer (More info?)

It was a cold day in September when Spack entered the world pub known as
rec.games.miniatures.warhammer and said...

> Ryan wrote on Tue, 30 Aug 2005 08:38:21 -0700:
>
> > 2) base coat all of model w/ GW ultramarines blue spray paint
>
> Unless you've got cans of this already stocked up, you'd be better off
> finding an alternative spray or just painting them in UM blue - GW haven't
> made UM blue spray (or any colour other than Chaos Black and Skull White)
> for well over a year now, in the UK it's rare to find a can of colour on the
> shelf in a GW store (and even then it's only in backwater stores that nobody
> ever goes to).
>
If you consider what GW was charging for spray cans in the first place
(around $8.00(US) around 5 years ago), the most economical way to spray
anything is with an air brush. You can get a cheap one for under $20 (US).
Then all you need is an air supply, for this you can either purchase canned
air or use an inner tube with an in line filter. Then you can usually find a
matching paint to any color you want in a craft store or wally world. So for
around $25 (US) you end up with a nearly unlimited supply of spray paint
without having to shake up cans for several hours, or worrying about the
paint eating your plastic.

--
Jim M

"Look alive. Here comes a buzzard." -- Walt Kelly (Pogo)
"The only game I like to play is Old Maid - provided she's not too old." --
Groucho Marx

http://jimac.tripod.com
!