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How to connect speaker wires if more than one wire

Last response: in Other Consumer Electronics
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June 3, 2011 6:41:06 PM

Hello, I have a 98 vw jetta and i am trying to replace the rear speakers but there seems to be 2 positive wires and two negative wires. Can i combine each + and - together to make one so i can connect the wire to the speakers sense the speaker only has one + and one - connection? Thanks
June 4, 2011 1:32:26 AM

harassas said:
Hello, I have a 98 vw jetta and i am trying to replace the rear speakers but there seems to be 2 positive wires and two negative wires. Can i combine each + and - together to make one so i can connect the wire to the speakers sense the speaker only has one + and one - connection? Thanks


if the back wires have two positive and two negative, that leads me to believe there is an amplifier installed with the factory radio.
and the tweeter is seperate from the woofer.
if you arent going to bypass the amplifier, i wouldnt chance it.
the tweeter might be getting less power than the woofer, and if you touch the wires together it will make an offset.
generally this is a good time for the speaker outputs to have very high impedance to refuse any signal being received as input.
higher impedance means more resistance to fight with on the way out, and that means more voltage .. more voltage means bigger pieces and higher cost.
since the system is a premium system that is installed with no intention of being used ever again (only removed or bypassed for a new system)
it is safe to say there is no protection if you combine both wires.

now if you bypass the amplifier.. you would still have to use the wires already there for an aftermarket radio.
when you are using the wires that are already there, then it wouldnt hurt a thing to combine them.
i was only trying to prevent you from blowing the factory amplifier.

maybe if you keep the factory amplifier, then it is a choice to buy some speaker components and hookup each wire to the crossover.
but
when you start changing speakers, you never know.. the tweeter might have been 16ohms and the new one is 6 ohms.
that will blow the factory amp.
better to remove it or lookup the info before buying the new speakers.

resistance and power is one thing.. the actual chunk size of the electricity is another thing that would lead to problems.
since tweeters dont use lots of long loads of electricity, they are shorter bursts, it would be another offset.
it might lead to fighting, or the woofer side taking over the tweeter side (but maybe the tweeter side is quicker and faster and balloons the woofer side)
either way, better safe than sorry.
these are reasonable guesses.

i have learned in the past.. it is always fun to open up a piece of electronics with a screwdriver.. but when you take off the lid and a spring comes flying out.
sometimes you dont know where it goes, and sometimes you dont know how to put it back on.
could ruin the whole point of trying to open it and fix it.

you might be able to check the ohms of each speaker if you disconnect it and check the ohms with a digital multimeter.
that number will be helpful.. until you realize not all speakers have the same impedance curve.
your new speaker might have a lowest ohm of 3
the factory speaker might have a lowest ohm of 8
to be safe from breaking it.. you would take the number the digital meter gives you and check the theile small parameters for the lowest ohm.
match those two for daily use and years of service.
but
chances are, the new speakers might be less loud than the factory ones (but maybe they sound much better?)
you might want to turn up the volume higher and that might be the reason the factory amp dies.

when you dont know, you should shove everything off of the table and start fresh with things that tell you the information.
this is especially true if you want more loud.
more cleaner could be finding the new speaker and installing it.
but
maybe there is nothing available for the numbers the multimeter gives you.
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