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Static IP

Tags:
  • Configuration
  • Static IP
  • Windows 7
Last response: in Windows 7
October 9, 2012 12:16:09 AM

How do I set a static IP in windows?

More about : static

Best solution

a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2012 12:21:39 AM

Simple:
Go to Control Panel\Network and Internet\Network Connections

Now right click on "Local Area Network" and select properties, now double click on "Internet Protocol Version 4."

For example you would put something like:

"192.168.20"
"255.255.255.0"
"192.168.1.1" <(Your routers IP)

You can use Google DNS servers:

"8.8.8.8"
"8.8.8.4"

If you wanna find your router IP and DNS go to run and type CMD then type in "ipconfig" which will give you all you need.
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October 9, 2012 12:24:29 AM

Thanks that worked!
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Related resources
October 9, 2012 12:24:37 AM

Best answer selected by ZlapTrap.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2012 12:32:11 AM

Hi :) 

If you havent paid for a Static IP from your ISP, it wont work for long....

All the best Brett :) 
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Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2012 7:30:53 AM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

If you havent paid for a Static IP from your ISP, it wont work for long....

All the best Brett :) 


Why exactly does setting a static IP on a PC have anything to do with your ISP?
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a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2012 7:50:19 AM

Quote:
Why exactly does setting a static IP on a PC have anything to do with your ISP?


If setting a static LAN IP was the point of the exercise, then nothing. However, you also have a WAN IP allocated by your ISP which is typically not static. This is the IP by which your PC is visible on the internet.
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Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2012 8:34:52 AM

Herr_Koos said:
If setting a static LAN IP was the point of the exercise, then nothing. However, you also have a WAN IP allocated by your ISP which is typically not static. This is the IP by which your PC is visible on the internet.


I know, as the OP did not mention that the IP was on the WAN side, together with the almost ubiquitous use of NAT routers by ISPs one would assume that the OP meant a LAN address.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2012 8:37:29 AM

Agreed.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2012 4:58:56 PM

Quote:
I know, as the OP did not mention that the IP was on the WAN side, together with the almost ubiquitous use of NAT routers by ISPs one would assume that the OP meant a LAN address.



Hi :) 

Maybe its different in the US but here in the UK , If that question is asked it almost always means a net IP, not a lan one....

All the best Brett :) 
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Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2012 4:59:33 PM

Not to me it doesn't and I am in the UK
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