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Dual boot with windows 7 on both drives

Tags:
  • Configuration
  • Windows 7
  • Computers
  • Hard Drives
  • Dual Boot
Last response: in Windows 7
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October 10, 2012 5:50:42 AM

My hard drive crashed. Bought a new one. Cloned another hard drive onto it. Old computer won't recognize the cloned drive but does in BIOS. I think the CPU was destroyed while cleaning the dust because it has prongs that clamped down and I couldn't see exactly where the gold pins were going to set in. Was very careful, but either the CPU is bad or the mother board is bad. Tested all other components in the working computer. Battery is fine. New cloned hard drive is fine. So I installed the cloned drive as a second OS drive in the working computer.

I now have to share the computer with my husband until I get a new CPU or MB for my better, more expensive computer.

Is it possible for him to log into "his" computer using "his" 1TB Sata HD, and then for me to come along and log into the cloned drive in his computer (2TB Sata HD) and do all of my work from that drive, so that when my own computer gets fixed, I'll have all the files I've worked on and programs installed that only I need on it and ready for use in my own computer, taking it out of my husband's computer after mine is fixed?

I'm sure I can go into BIOS and change the boot order whenever either one of us sits down to use the computer, but he's not going to want to do that each time, being pretty much computer illiterate as he is.

Is there some other way to do a user switch easily during any time of the day when we need to share his computer?

If you reply with any computer technical terms, please explain each in baby steps. I know a lot but not everything and am in a hurry to not have to re-ask or question what might have been offered as a suggestion.


Thanks so much to anyone who can help with this. I hope it's easily done.

More about : dual boot windows drives

a c 238 $ Windows 7
October 10, 2012 2:20:55 PM

Does your bios main post screen offer a hotkey to select the boot device. My gigabyte board has the usual F2-Setup to get into the bios, but also a F12-Boot. I can just hit F12 and select the boot drive from the list. This does not alter the actual boot priority in the bios, so on next reboot it should boot offf the correct default device/drive.

Your main problem is that your OS may not boot in his computer due to hardware/driver differences.
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October 10, 2012 2:36:53 PM

The screen flashes by so fast that in all the 100's of times I restarted the computer my eyes couldn't focus fast enough on the screen area to see the function commands. Is there any way to slow down that screen so I can actually read it? F10 gets me into BIOS.

Quote:
Your main problem is that your OS may not boot in his computer due to hardware/driver differences.


The drive was just purchased yesterday and I used Seagate's Clone Drive utility and cloned his drive, and the new drive and his drive are both inside his computer.

I'll shut down and see if I can slow that screen down and try to find a hot key. If not, I'll change the boot order to the newer drive to make sure it works.

But now this raises a question. If I do use my new hard drive in his HP computer with Windows7 and his entire drive cloned onto it, and then install the hard drive back into my own computer once I replace the CPU or MB, will my drive work in the ASUS gaming machine that I'll be fixing and putting that hard drive into? I read somewhere that your MB is forever connected to a serial number of any OS. I don't understand how that could be considering I've replaced a MB before.

His HP machine is a 6000 Pavilion, if anyone knows what the hot key might be.
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a c 238 $ Windows 7
October 10, 2012 2:49:50 PM

OEM versions of windows are tied to the motherboard. You would need to call microsoft in order to reactivate. Usually telling them your motherboard died suffices. Retail versions are not tied to the motherboard. Moving the drive into the new system later may cause the problems I mentioned above - the hardware/drivers will be different and thus may not boot properly once moved to your new system.

There may be an option in your bios listed as "quick boot". You can try disabling it. Also, if there is a bios splash screen, you should be able to disable it too.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 10, 2012 3:02:09 PM

Why don't you just make two user accounts in the same W7 installation? It's just like having two computers except you can't use them both at the samr time.
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October 10, 2012 3:03:43 PM

Okay, thanks. It sounds like I'll need to purchase an OS and HDrive when the time comes, but at least I'll have everything on the new HD and can just use it as a second drive in the fixed computer. I really hate having to pay Microsoft for an OS.

All the dead drives in my house are Seagates. Is Western Digital a better product? I'm considering not being loyal any longer.
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a c 238 $ Windows 7
October 10, 2012 3:07:56 PM

ram1009 said:
Why don't you just make two user accounts in the same W7 installation? It's just like having two computers except you can't use them both at the samr time.


How will she be able to move the account to a new system later?
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a c 238 $ Windows 7
October 10, 2012 3:10:07 PM

gtswhitt said:
All the dead drives in my house are Seagates. Is Western Digital a better product? I'm considering not being loyal any longer.


I've always been a fan of WD drives, but I've learned not to be loyal. All manufacturer's seem to go through stages of bad quality control.
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October 10, 2012 3:33:22 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
How will she be able to move the account to a new system later?


Are you all talking about the USER login and password for viewing different desktops? That wouldn't switch which hard drive both users were looking at, right?
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a c 238 $ Windows 7
October 10, 2012 5:24:48 PM

gtswhitt said:
Are you all talking about the USER login and password for viewing different desktops? That wouldn't switch which hard drive both users were looking at, right?


No, her entire account, programs and all since she is trying to move to a new system when it comes in. I was just asking because I know of no way to move an entire account, programs and all. Normally you'd have to reinstall programs.
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October 11, 2012 9:30:43 AM

Since it'll be the entire hard drive with the programs, do you (or anyone) know if I'll have a problem just installing the hard drive into the fixed computer, turning it on and being able to see the full OS and programs on it? I sure don't want to move all of my customer files and work onto the new hard drive only to find out that it won't work with the new mother board or CPU (which are the only two parts that may have to be changed out on my broken computer). Yes, the OS that I cloned onto the newly purchased hard drive is OEM, because it's cloned from my husband's hard drive, and yes, the user name on the hard drive would be his and not mine. Any ideas if I'll be good to go or end up having to format the new hard drive rather than being able to just move it to the fixed system?
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a c 238 $ Windows 7
October 11, 2012 12:18:36 PM

As I said in my very first reply to you... Your main problem is that your OS may not boot in his computer due to hardware/driver differences.

The same applies to moving it to any system that has a different motherboard than the one you are replacing. Sometimes a repair install can get it going again. If not, you'll end up having to clean install the OS and programs anyhow.

Also, being that you cloned an OEM system, windows may not activate. If you call microsoft and explain your motherboard died, they may give you a new activation code.
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October 11, 2012 2:29:14 PM

Well shoot! You did say that! I've jumped around on so many forums, I'd forgotten where I read that and it was right here. Just wanted to double check another person's opinion and came right back here to do so! LOL
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