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CPU damaged? 2 seconds before knowing fan failed

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December 19, 2002 6:12:35 PM

Hi everyone! Today I was reattaching the powercable for my AMD XP 2100 cpu's fan/HS (it is a Volcano 9). After finishing all the connections, I powered up my system and noticed the CPU fan was not moving. I quickly unplugged my case's power core and stopped the system from booting up (2-3 secs)

I am wondering if my CPU might be damaged in the process, because the fan was not on for 2-3 seconds before I could unplug my computer's power cable. The heatsink was firmly attached and thermal compound was in place.

Will there be damage done to my AMD CPU? Should I be on the lookout for future cpu failures?
December 19, 2002 6:19:40 PM

Yes, you just wasted your CPU. You might as well give it to me, I'll dispose it safely.

<i>/Copenhagen - Clockspeed will make the difference... in the end</i> :cool:
December 19, 2002 6:30:53 PM

Erm is this a serious post or someones idea of a bad joke ?


Tim

<font color=blue>Its winter now... So how come my CPU temp is still </font color=blue><b><font color=red>55C</font color=red></b>
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December 19, 2002 7:00:14 PM

Seems not many want to answer you.

I don't think it fried. First of all you had the HSF on it and the compound, this is enough to secure about 1 minute before the temps really get hot.

You must make sure you properly connected the CPU fan before anything.

What motherboard are you using?

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December 19, 2002 7:56:49 PM

The Volcano series with manual adjustable fan speeds has like 2-3 connectors that seems to go to the motherboard. I believe only 1 is the power supplier and it is in black. The other 2 or 1 are color yellow and they are only for monitoring the fan speed and does NOT have power going in them. I had the same situation before when I installed a Volcano 7+ and the fan did not start. I ahd the yellow connector connected to the mobo which is wrong. That was 2 months ago and so far so good, I had AS3 too.
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December 19, 2002 10:49:32 PM

No, It would take longer than that, with the heatsink in place.




Details, Details, Its all in the Details, If you need help, Don't leave out the Details.
December 20, 2002 12:17:40 AM

thanks for the replies! I have an ASUS A7N8X motherboard. Initially I thought the volcano uses the 3 pin power connector that connects directly to the motherboard, then I read the manual again and saw the specification, which states that I need to plug the 3 pin power cable to a 4 pin converter, then plug the now 4 pin power cable to a 4 pin outlet from the power supply.

Somehow I connected the Volcano's 4 pin receiver incorrectly. It has a feature to let us chain up all the fan powercables (it is a 4 pin connector with two sides, one goes in and one goes out), and I plugged in the Volcano's 4 pin connector behind the power supply's outlet, where I should have connected it to the other end.

I think the motherboard has the cpu over temperature protection, because when I realized the fan wasn't moving, I hit the power switch and it won't turn off, then I went panic and pulled the plug, and that turned the power off for sure, hehe.
December 20, 2002 4:45:02 AM

The main thing is that you realized the fan was not running,and you reacted quickly.Must have been your lucky day..:) 

If ya don't ask..How ya gonna know.
December 20, 2002 6:12:21 AM

I also did a similar thing with my XP1600 and a Volcano7...
I didn´t realize the fan was not moving until maybe 15-20 seconds...no harm done.

As for the computer not switching off, I think it´s a feature you can select in BIOS.
You have to push the button for 4 seconds before it turns off.

<font color=blue>My sig, not yours</font color=blue>
January 1, 2003 8:31:50 PM

Should be OK, the HS was in place and it still runs :smile:

For an interesting look at what happens when a processor runs WITHOUT a HS-see Tom's excellent article/video:

http://www6.tomshardware.com/cpu/20010917/

<font color=red>I need to OC....just to read the posts faster!</font color=red>
January 3, 2003 8:06:52 AM

Do the following:
Unplug your fan, power up the computer, enter the bios and watch the temperature rising from bios.
You'll see that it takes a lot of time(10 minutes for mine) before reaching 95-100 C. degree that could damage the cpu.

:wink: <font color=green> The second time is always better than the first :wink: </font color=green>
January 3, 2003 8:47:27 AM

Old Post

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January 3, 2003 10:44:55 AM

Quote:
Do the following:
Unplug your fan, power up the computer, enter the bios and watch the temperature rising from bios.
You'll see that it takes a lot of time(10 minutes for mine) before reaching 95-100 C. degree that could damage the cpu.

Don't do this ! (its just silly)

Also the CPU doesn't run anywhere near the levels it would in an intensive situation like this and produces less heat... But the point is true, a passive heatsink will save a processor for a small period of time, which will vary depending on how good your case cooling is.

Tim




<font color=blue>Its winter now... So how come my CPU temp is still </font color=blue><b><font color=red>55C</font color=red></b>
January 3, 2003 8:36:09 PM

Quote:
Don't do this ! (its just silly)
Also the CPU doesn't run anywhere near the levels it would in an intensive situation like this and produces less heat...

1. It's not silly, at least puffguts will know approximately the time the cpu reaches dangerous levels with his heatsink, also he will see that the cpu is not so easy to burn, he can test the motherboard protection, in two words he gains experience, not silly
2. It's a known fact that in bios the cpu waste more watts, i.e. produce more heat than in idle mode uder windows 2000/xp. Check it yourself, if you don't believe.
Best wishes.

:wink: <font color=green> The second time is always better than the first :wink: </font color=green>
January 4, 2003 4:06:58 PM

It is silly... it is unecessary risk and I realise that there are safe guards in place and no damage should come to the processor, but many people read these forums and a genral suggestion like this is not such a sensible one.

2ndly if you read what I said, you will see that I said the BIOS doesn't utilise anywhere near an intensive situation, there is no mention of Idle-ing !

Tim

<font color=blue>Its winter now... So how come my CPU temp is still </font color=blue><b><font color=red>55C</font color=red></b>
!