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LED TV's with best uniformity and least motion blur.

Last response: in Home Theatre
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October 26, 2010 12:47:37 AM

I'm shopping for a new HDTV in the 40 to 50" range. I'm concerned with picture quality. One brief trip down the TV aisle has already given examples of LCD motion blur and pixilation (Samsung & LG). It seems quite widespread.
I'm leaning toward an LED or a Plasma.
a b x TV
October 26, 2010 7:26:45 AM

What were you watching that had motion blur and pixelation? A live sports game?
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October 26, 2010 1:06:03 PM

jaguarskx said:
What were you watching that had motion blur and pixelation? A live sports game?

Hi,
Yes, they had NFL football on at the time.
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a b x TV
October 26, 2010 7:06:43 PM

It is not primarily the fault of the HDTV with the exception of motion blur. The primary reason why you are seeing pixelation is due to real-time video compression that is necessary to reduce the size of the video stream so that it will not over-saturate the limited bandwidth of broadband.

I'm not sure how much bandwith is necessary for uncompressed 1080p video, but I would not be surprised if it was 1GB per minute. Therefore it is necessary to do real-time compression since broadband is nowhere near that speed.

The problem with real-time compression is if there is a lot of movement on the screen, like when the camera is panning, then you will have a lot of "noise". Everything is moving and I assume they use a constant bit rate when compressing. That results in a lot of pixelation and motion blur as well.

If you want any sports game to look like a blu-ray movie, then your gonna be very disppointed 'cause that's not going to happen.
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a b x TV
October 26, 2010 7:10:58 PM

For any sports event to be free of pixelation, the event must 1st be recorded without any compression at all; which means at least 60GB of video data per hour, then it must go through a two-pass encoding process.

Basically, that means the game will be broadcasted the following night.
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October 26, 2010 9:45:42 PM

jaguarskx said:
It is not primarily the fault of the HDTV with the exception of motion blur. The primary reason why you are seeing pixelation is due to real-time video compression that is necessary to reduce the size of the video stream so that it will not over-saturate the limited bandwidth of broadband.

I'm not sure how much bandwith is necessary for uncompressed 1080p video, but I would not be surprised if it was 1GB per minute. Therefore it is necessary to do real-time compression since broadband is nowhere near that speed.

The problem with real-time compression is if there is a lot of movement on the screen, like when the camera is panning, then you will have a lot of "noise". Everything is moving and I assume they use a constant bit rate when compressing. That results in a lot of pixelation and motion blur as well.

If you want any sports game to look like a blu-ray movie, then your gonna be very disppointed 'cause that's not going to happen.


I'm not expecting "any sports game to look like a blu-ray movie", but I do expect a picture superior to my old 480i CRT. Not all of the models had these problems. The Samsung 530, 630, and an LG(I didn't look at the model) did have these problems. And the LN46C630 is a consumer reports recommended LCD TV, and that was model I was paying attention to when this happened. I've heard so MANY times that you could see the blades of grass(referring to a football game). I expected a lot more for a $1000 TV.
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a b x TV
October 27, 2010 2:37:22 AM

It's not the HDTV (and $1,000 is not a lot of money for a HDTV). It is the fact that real-time compression is being performed. No matter how good your TV is if the source material is flawed, it will be displayed flawed regardless of how much money you spend on the TV itself.

As I mentioned above, it is a bandwidth issues and uncompressed HD video is a tremendously massive stream of data. Far more than any high speed internet connection can handle.

This is one of the limitation of HD content especially regarding live broadcast since there is no time to "clean up" the compression before transmitting it.
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a b x TV
October 27, 2010 2:39:55 AM

terry4536 said:
I've heard so MANY times that you could see the blades of grass(referring to a football game). I expected a lot more for a $1000 TV.


Sure... I suppose if it is a still picture and the camera is zoomed in enough. They could also have been exaggerating a little bit as well.
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