How can I transfer Windows XP to a new computer?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC and
install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do this for
my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a policy regarding
Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a copy of XP to another
computer? If so, what is the process that I have to go through?


--
-----------------------------------
Ken Varn
Senior Software Engineer
Diebold Inc.

EmailID = varnk
Domain = Diebold.com
-----------------------------------
14 answers Last reply
More about transfer windows computer
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Ken Varn wrote:

    > My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC and
    > install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do this for
    > my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a policy regarding
    > Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a copy of XP to another
    > computer? If so, what is the process that I have to go through?
    >
    >

    For XP if it's a retail version it can be moved to the new machine no
    problem. For OEM's the EULA states it's tied to the first machine on
    which it is installed and can't be moved to a new one.

    --
    Rock
    MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    OK, since you said 'purchased copy' I will assume it's a retail version, not
    something that came installed. Pop in the CD and follow instructions. It
    may do fine and validate without a problem, or you may have to call a toll
    free number. Just explain the computer died and you are putting it on a new
    computer. As long as you aren't running it on more than one machine, it
    should be no problem.

    You do have the 25 digit number on a sticker somewhere don't you? You will
    need it.

    "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    news:%23G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC and
    > install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do this for
    > my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a policy regarding
    > Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a copy of XP to another
    > computer? If so, what is the process that I have to go through?
    >
    >
    > --
    > -----------------------------------
    > Ken Varn
    > Senior Software Engineer
    > Diebold Inc.
    >
    > EmailID = varnk
    > Domain = Diebold.com
    > -----------------------------------
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    news:%23G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC and
    > install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do this for
    > my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a policy regarding
    > Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a copy of XP to another
    > computer? If so, what is the process that I have to go through?
    >
    >
    > --
    Following Gordon's advice you may also have to phone Microsoft and explain
    your situation and they will re-activate your product key number. A friend
    of mine had to do this with no problems from Microsoft.
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    news:#G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl
    > My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC
    > and install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do
    > this for my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a
    > policy regarding Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a
    > copy of XP to another computer? If so, what is the process that I
    > have to go through?

    Depends on what version your copy of XP is. If it's a retail copy, then just
    install it on your new machine. If you can, remove it from the old first.
    Then just activate in the norml manner. If it's more than 120 days since you
    last activated, it should go through without any problems.
    If however your copy is an OEM copy, then it is tied to your old machine in
    eternity and cannot be installed on another. You will have to "obtain"
    another copy in this case.

    HTH
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Thanks for the info.

    Both Windows XP and Office XP are not OEM versions.

    I actually was thinking about just popping the old hard drive out of my old
    system and putting it in my new system. The hard drive is fine. The
    motherboard and case are primarily what I will be replacing. I just wasn't
    sure how much scrutiny Windows XP uses when detecting hardware changes for
    product activation.

    --
    -----------------------------------
    Ken Varn
    Senior Software Engineer
    Diebold Inc.

    EmailID = varnk
    Domain = Diebold.com
    -----------------------------------
    "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
    news:eoyTlHDmFHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    > news:#G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl
    > > My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC
    > > and install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do
    > > this for my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a
    > > policy regarding Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a
    > > copy of XP to another computer? If so, what is the process that I
    > > have to go through?
    >
    > Depends on what version your copy of XP is. If it's a retail copy, then
    just
    > install it on your new machine. If you can, remove it from the old first.
    > Then just activate in the norml manner. If it's more than 120 days since
    you
    > last activated, it should go through without any problems.
    > If however your copy is an OEM copy, then it is tied to your old machine
    in
    > eternity and cannot be installed on another. You will have to "obtain"
    > another copy in this case.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "The Grey One" <greywolf@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:%14Ie.21236$Fx3.12892@newsfe7-gui.ntli.net
    > "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    > news:%23G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC
    >> and install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to
    >> do this for my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a
    >> policy regarding Product Activation that allows someone to transfer
    >> a copy of XP to another computer? If so, what is the process that I
    >> have to go through?
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    > Following Gordon's advice you may also have to phone Microsoft

    generally not if it's more than 120 days after the previous activation - I
    believe that MS clear out the files every 120 days!
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote

    > "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    > news:#G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl
    >> My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC
    >> and install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do
    >> this for my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a
    >> policy regarding Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a
    >> copy of XP to another computer? If so, what is the process that I
    >> have to go through?
    >
    > Depends on what version your copy of XP is. If it's a retail copy, then
    > just
    > install it on your new machine. If you can, remove it from the old first.

    What for? Why would the OP want to waste his time doing that?

    > Then just activate in the norml manner. If it's more than 120 days since
    > you
    > last activated, it should go through without any problems.

    Why should a retail version cause problems?

    > If however your copy is an OEM copy, then it is tied to your old machine
    > in
    > eternity and cannot be installed on another. You will have to "obtain"
    > another copy in this case.
    >
    > HTH

    Not true. If it's been over 120 days, the OEM will activate nicely on the
    new PC. If you want to be in compliance, make sure that some hardware from
    your old machine (say, the case or floppy drive) is put on the new PC and
    then you can call the new one an upgrade to the old one.

    Alias
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Alias wrote:
    > "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote
    >
    >> "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    >> news:#G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl
    >>> My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC
    >>> and install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to
    >>> do this for my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a
    >>> policy regarding Product Activation that allows someone to transfer
    >>> a copy of XP to another computer? If so, what is the process that I
    >>> have to go through?
    >>
    >> Depends on what version your copy of XP is. If it's a retail copy,
    >> then just
    >> install it on your new machine. If you can, remove it from the old
    >> first.
    >
    > What for? Why would the OP want to waste his time doing that?

    Uh, because that's the legal requirement.

    >
    > Not true. If it's been over 120 days, the OEM will activate nicely on
    > the new PC.

    > If you want to be in compliance, make sure that some
    > hardware from your old machine (say, the case or floppy drive) is put
    > on the new PC and then you can call the new one an upgrade to the old
    > one.

    What for? Why would the OP want to waste his time doing that?
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote

    > "The Grey One" <greywolf@yahoo.co.uk> wrote

    >> "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote
    >>> My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC
    >>> and install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to
    >>> do this for my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a
    >>> policy regarding Product Activation that allows someone to transfer
    >>> a copy of XP to another computer? If so, what is the process that I
    >>> have to go through?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >> Following Gordon's advice you may also have to phone Microsoft
    >
    > generally not if it's more than 120 days after the previous activation - I
    > believe that MS clear out the files every 120 days!

    Not after the previous activation but after the last hardware change that's
    on MS' Ten Most Wanted Hardware point system list.

    Alias
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Rock" <rock@mail.nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:OmJ2RWDmFHA.3144@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > Ken Varn wrote:
    >
    >> My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC and
    >> install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do this
    >> for
    >> my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a policy regarding
    >> Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a copy of XP to
    >> another
    >> computer? If so, what is the process that I have to go through?
    >>
    >>
    >
    > For XP if it's a retail version it can be moved to the new machine no
    > problem. For OEM's the EULA states it's tied to the first machine on
    > which it is installed and can't be moved to a new one.
    >
    > --
    > Rock
    > MS MVP Windows - Shell/User

    Ah, but it doesn't say what constitutes a "new machine" so if the OP were to
    change all his hardware except his floppy or case, for example, it would not
    constitute a "new machine".

    Alias
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:uYSH$oDmFHA.3304@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Alias wrote:
    >> "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote
    >>
    >>> "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    >>> news:#G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl
    >>>> My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC
    >>>> and install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to
    >>>> do this for my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a
    >>>> policy regarding Product Activation that allows someone to transfer
    >>>> a copy of XP to another computer? If so, what is the process that I
    >>>> have to go through?
    >>>
    >>> Depends on what version your copy of XP is. If it's a retail copy,
    >>> then just
    >>> install it on your new machine. If you can, remove it from the old
    >>> first.
    >>
    >> What for? Why would the OP want to waste his time doing that?
    >
    > Uh, because that's the legal requirement.

    Um, no it isn't. It's the EULA requirement, MS' rules, not law.
    >
    >>
    >> Not true. If it's been over 120 days, the OEM will activate nicely on
    >> the new PC.
    >
    >> If you want to be in compliance, make sure that some
    >> hardware from your old machine (say, the case or floppy drive) is put
    >> on the new PC and then you can call the new one an upgrade to the old
    >> one.
    >
    > What for? Why would the OP want to waste his time doing that?

    As the OP has pointed out, all he is buying is a new motherboard and case.

    Alias
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Ken Varn wrote:
    > Thanks for the info.
    >
    > Both Windows XP and Office XP are not OEM versions.
    >
    > I actually was thinking about just popping the old hard drive out of my old
    > system and putting it in my new system. The hard drive is fine. The
    > motherboard and case are primarily what I will be replacing. I just wasn't
    > sure how much scrutiny Windows XP uses when detecting hardware changes for
    > product activation.
    >


    Normally, and assuming a retail license (many OEM installations are
    BIOS-locked to a specific chipset and therefore not transferable to a
    new motherboard - check yours before starting), unless the new
    motherboard is virtually identical (same chipset, same IDE controllers,
    same BIOS version, etc.) to the one on which the WinXP installation was
    originally performed, you'll need to perform a repair (a.k.a. in-place
    upgrade) installation, at the very least:

    How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows XP
    http://support.microsoft.com/directory/article.asp?ID=KB;EN-US;Q315341

    The "why" is quite simple, really, and has nothing to do with
    licensing issues, per se; it's a purely technical matter, at this point.
    You've pulled the proverbial hardware rug out from under the OS. (If
    you don't like -- or get -- the rug analogy, think of it as picking up a
    Cape Cod style home and then setting it down onto a Ranch style
    foundation. It just isn't going to fit.) WinXP, like Win2K before it,
    is not nearly as "promiscuous" as Win9x when it comes to accepting any
    old hardware configuration you throw at it. On installation it
    "tailors" itself to the specific hardware found. This is one of the
    reasons that the entire WinNT/2K/XP OS family is so much more stable
    than the Win9x group.

    As always when undertaking such a significant change, back up any
    important data before starting.

    This will also probably require re-activation, unless you have a
    Volume Licensed version of WinXP Pro installed. If it's been more than
    120 days since you last activated that specific Product Key, you'll most
    likely be able to activate via the Internet without problem. If it's
    been less, you might have to make a 5 minute phone call.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    First things I would do is backup all your Outlook setting to the pst file,
    save all the docs, xls, and ppts all to CDR or CDRW. Do this irregardless
    what method you decide on the new motherboard install of XP.

    Although not as much as a problem as it has been, moving a hard drive from
    one motherboard to another can have minor or major read problems of the
    partition and filesystem. Therefore, I continue to recommend making all new
    partition(s) NTFS and formatting new while connected to the new motherboard,
    followed by a new XP install.

    A repair XP install may work on the new motherboard without resorting to
    creating new partition(s) and formatting. The result may be iffy if the
    original filesystem is a little off.

    Don't forget to install the motherboard's drivers. These should be on CD
    accompanied by the motherboard. Might as well check the motherboard maker's
    website for anything new now, and burn that to CD as well. Get the MS XP
    SP2 CD first too. Then, make your move.

    "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    news:uIIC$kDmFHA.1416@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Thanks for the info.
    >
    > Both Windows XP and Office XP are not OEM versions.
    >
    > I actually was thinking about just popping the old hard drive out of my
    old
    > system and putting it in my new system. The hard drive is fine. The
    > motherboard and case are primarily what I will be replacing. I just
    wasn't
    > sure how much scrutiny Windows XP uses when detecting hardware changes for
    > product activation.
    >
    > --
    > -----------------------------------
    > Ken Varn
    > Senior Software Engineer
    > Diebold Inc.
    >
    > EmailID = varnk
    > Domain = Diebold.com
    > -----------------------------------
    > "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:eoyTlHDmFHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > > "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    > > news:#G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl
    > > > My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC
    > > > and install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do
    > > > this for my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a
    > > > policy regarding Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a
    > > > copy of XP to another computer? If so, what is the process that I
    > > > have to go through?
    > >
    > > Depends on what version your copy of XP is. If it's a retail copy, then
    > just
    > > install it on your new machine. If you can, remove it from the old
    first.
    > > Then just activate in the norml manner. If it's more than 120 days since
    > you
    > > last activated, it should go through without any problems.
    > > If however your copy is an OEM copy, then it is tied to your old machine
    > in
    > > eternity and cannot be installed on another. You will have to "obtain"
    > > another copy in this case.
    > >
    > > HTH
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Answer to your first question is yes, but that's only a Microsoft policy.
    Second question, the usual activation process. Ken you shouldn't have to pay
    twice for WinXP (nor office for that matter). Use your existing software to
    install on your new hardware. If you have to get activated over the phone
    and your WinXP (and office) are OEM versions, the only thing the MS PA
    Person needs to know is that you had to re-install windows for any reason
    you choose. Like, I had to cause of a virus, or my system need a rebuild, or
    I just felt like it. That bypasses any "policy regarding .....
    transfer....". I don't know about the workings of BIOS locked OEMs, I can
    say for generic or retail versions you should have no problems. Don't let
    anyone in this group (The MS-SS) tell you that you need to purchase another
    copy based on some flimsy, so called agreement. There's nothing to worry
    about, it your Windows XP.

    - Winux P

    "Ken Varn" <nospam> wrote in message
    news:%23G5VDEDmFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > My PC at home has just died. I want to purchase a new barebones PC and
    > install my purchased copy of XP on the new PC. I also want to do this for
    > my purchased copy of Office XP. Does Microsoft have a policy regarding
    > Product Activation that allows someone to transfer a copy of XP to another
    > computer? If so, what is the process that I have to go through?
    >
    >
    > --
    > -----------------------------------
    > Ken Varn
    > Senior Software Engineer
    > Diebold Inc.
    >
    > EmailID = varnk
    > Domain = Diebold.com
    > -----------------------------------
    >
    >
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