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Mouse and keyboard not working at W7 login screen

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Last response: in Windows 7
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October 11, 2012 9:53:41 AM

Hey, I've searched for hours looking for solutions to my problems, here they are.

Whenever I start my computer and it gets to the Windows 7 login screen, my mouse and keyboard won't respond.

They work in BIOS but once Windows 7 starts to boot up...nothing!

My PC doesn't have any PS/2 ports on it, only USB so I can't even access my Desktop to see if the driver are enabled or if the Power Management options are right.

I can't do a "Last Known System Configuration" because F8 won't work.

My information:

Alienware X-51
Windows 7 Home
Intel Core 3.40
6GB RAM
NVidia Graphics Geforce GT545
Logitech Keyboard
Alienware Mouse

I can provide any other info that is needed

October 11, 2012 6:36:21 PM

you tried another mouse and keyboard
u tried another operation system
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a b $ Windows 7
October 11, 2012 7:22:05 PM

At the login screen, unplug the keyboard momentarily, then plug it back in. Windows should re-detect it.
Also check in BIOS, make sure Legacy USB Support is enabled.
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October 12, 2012 12:43:44 AM

I have tried another Mouse and Keyboard-they won't work
I only have Windows 7

I'll try unplugging and plugging it back in and post back here in a bit
When I looked through BIOS, I didn't see a "Legacy USB Support" option, can you show me how to find it? Is it possible that it has another name on my system?

There is a "USB Controller" option and that's enabled by default.


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October 12, 2012 4:17:10 AM

So I tried what Jtt suggested(Unplugging and plugging back in the keyboard)but it didn't work.

I still don't know how to get to the "Legacy USB Support" Option in BIOS
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October 12, 2012 4:19:58 AM

Onus said:
At the login screen, unplug the keyboard momentarily, then plug it back in. Windows should re-detect it.
Also check in BIOS, make sure Legacy USB Support is enabled.


I accidentally forgot to click reply, my bad!

I tried unplugging and plugging the Keyboard back in(Mouse Also)and that didn't work.

Could you explain how to get to that option in BIOS because I didn't see it.

I did however, see an option that said "USB Controller" which is enabled by default.
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October 12, 2012 7:41:50 AM

in bios
seek this tab
bios integrated
or bios peripherals
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October 12, 2012 10:20:57 AM

profkefah said:
in bios
seek this tab
bios integrated
or bios peripherals


The closest thing I have to that is "Advanced BIOS Features" and in there my only options are:

Bootup Num-Lock [On]
OptionRom Display Screen [Display]

My tabs are:

Main
Advanced
-Standard CMOS Features
-Advanced BIOS Features
-CPU Configuration
-Integrated Devices
-Power Management Setup
Security
Boot
-Hard Disk Drive BBS Priorities
Exit

If that helps
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October 12, 2012 10:18:46 PM

check
Advanced BIOS Features
Integrated Devices
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October 12, 2012 11:43:23 PM

profkefah said:
check
Advanced BIOS Features
Integrated Devices


Under Advanced BIOS Features the only two options I have are:

Bootup Num-Lock [On]
OptionRom Display Screen [Display]

Under Integrated Devices my options are:

USB Controller [Enabled]
HD Audio [Enabled]
Onboard LAN Controller [Disabled]
Primary Display [Discrete]

PCH SATA Configuration
SATA Mode [AHCI Mode]

(It won't allow me to change the SATA Mode because it's grayed out)

Which one is it?
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October 13, 2012 12:13:22 AM

ok
man since keyboard working properly in bios
u may have to install another copy of windows
since this one u installed may be the cause of problem
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a b $ Windows 7
October 13, 2012 12:36:34 AM

Is your copy of Windows 7 legitimate?
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October 13, 2012 8:35:53 AM

Onus said:
Is your copy of Windows 7 legitimate?


Yes, it came pre-installed on my PC but I also have a install/repair disc
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October 13, 2012 8:39:32 AM

profkefah said:
ok
man since keyboard working properly in bios
u may have to install another copy of windows
since this one u installed may be the cause of problem


Is there a way I can do that without losing all my files?

'Cause I have really important stuff on there. (pictures and movies of family outings, notes to self, game save files,etc) :( 
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a b $ Windows 7
October 13, 2012 5:26:35 PM

You could replace your original hard drive, use the repair disk to restore to a new drive, then install your old drive as a secondary drive in order to get the data off of it. If the new drive does not come with one, you will also need to get a SATA cable to reconnect it.
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October 13, 2012 10:31:08 PM

Onus said:
You could replace your original hard drive, use the repair disk to restore to a new drive, then install your old drive as a secondary drive in order to get the data off of it. If the new drive does not come with one, you will also need to get a SATA cable to reconnect it.

THATS RIGHT
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October 14, 2012 5:37:28 AM

Onus said:
You could replace your original hard drive, use the repair disk to restore to a new drive, then install your old drive as a secondary drive in order to get the data off of it. If the new drive does not come with one, you will also need to get a SATA cable to reconnect it.



Is there...a guide or walkthrough or something for that?

I don't even know where I could get another Hard Drive or what a SATA Cable is or is for.

How could I get the data off it without being able to access it?



I don't know nothing 'bout fixin' no computers.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 14, 2012 1:43:25 PM

There are videos on YouTube of people installing or replacing hard drives. Many of them show an IDE (PATA) drive being replaced; the only differences are the cables, and there are no jumpers to set on SATA drives. An IDE drive uses a 4-pin Molex power connection and a 40 (or 80) pin ribbon cable (there are thick round ones available too, but the wide ends are the same); a SATA drive usually uses 15-pin flat connector (there may be only 4-5 wires going into it) for power, and a thin 7-pin data cable. You would remove your original drive and install the new one, then restore your system to the new drive. Assuming it is now working, you then re-install the original drive as an ADDITIONAL drive, not replacing the new one. It will appear as another drive letter (usually D: or E:, depending on if there is an optical drive in your system). Your system should have a spare power connector in it, but if the new drive does not come with a data cable, you may need to buy one. SATA cables are usually pretty cheap (<$5). If the drive is IDE, let us know as there are a few additional details like jumper settings on the drives.
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October 15, 2012 8:46:49 AM

Onus said:
There are videos on YouTube of people installing or replacing hard drives. Many of them show an IDE (PATA) drive being replaced; the only differences are the cables, and there are no jumpers to set on SATA drives. An IDE drive uses a 4-pin Molex power connection and a 40 (or 80) pin ribbon cable (there are thick round ones available too, but the wide ends are the same); a SATA drive usually uses 15-pin flat connector (there may be only 4-5 wires going into it) for power, and a thin 7-pin data cable. You would remove your original drive and install the new one, then restore your system to the new drive. Assuming it is now working, you then re-install the original drive as an ADDITIONAL drive, not replacing the new one. It will appear as another drive letter (usually D: or E:, depending on if there is an optical drive in your system). Your system should have a spare power connector in it, but if the new drive does not come with a data cable, you may need to buy one. SATA cables are usually pretty cheap (<$5). If the drive is IDE, let us know as there are a few additional details like jumper settings on the drives.



OK. :o 

I'd prefer to expend all other options before I perform rocket surgery.

I hope you'll understand. :D 

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!