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DSLR: Can't tell if my lenses are broken

First and foremost, I have never used a DSLR before but I'm having fun in learning how much more functional it is.


My parents got a Canon EOS 50D a few days ago for an upcoming event, but they sort-of don't know much more than a point-and-shoot (like me).

Problem: The lenses don't seem to retract all the way correctly, I have to push it in while rotating.
I'm thinking it's broken, and if it really is, I'd like suggestions on dealing with it.

Thanks
11 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about dslr lenses broken
  1. There are two rings on the lens; Zoom Ring (Large/Wider ring) and Focus Ring (smaller ring). There is a switch on the side of the lens for Focus and Stabilizer. If the lens is a professional, it has a red band around the lens (indication of the Professional lens) in which the focus ring can be turned even if the focus switch is on AUTO MODE.

    The Gold band around the lens means is ultrasonic, it has a better mechanism and probably better lens than one with a silver band lenses. These lenses focus ring should not be touch if focus switch is on automatic setting. Doing so will damage focusing mechanism unless otherwise indicated on your canon's manual.

    NOTE: The lens zoom will not retract by it self because it is manual. It does not have automatic zoom so whatever position you use it last then that how it set when you turn the camera off. The only thing that might retract or extract is the focusing ring unless the lens has an internal focusing system.

    Pro Lens is distinguish by the red band near the front of the lens.
    http://usa.canon.com/cusa/professional/products/lenses/ef_lens_lineup/lens_uw_pro/ef_16_35mm_f_2_8l_ii_usm

    http://www.canon.com/bctv/faq/if.html

    If for some reason the camera is not focusing when the focusing switch is on AUTO MODE then it is possible that the lens focusing mechanism is damage.
  2. rexter said:
    There are two rings on the lens; Zoom Ring (Large/Wider ring) and Focus Ring (smaller ring). There is a switch on the side of the lens for Focus and Stabilizer. If the lens is a professional, it has a red band around the lens (indication of the Professional lens) in which the focus ring can be turned even if the focus switch is on AUTO MODE.

    The Gold band around the lens means is ultrasonic, it has a better mechanism and probably better lens than one with a silver band lenses. These lenses focus ring should not be touch if focus switch is on automatic setting. Doing so will damage focusing mechanism unless otherwise indicated on your canon's manual.

    NOTE: The lens zoom will not retract by it self because it is manual. It does not have automatic zoom so whatever position you use it last then that how it set when you turn the camera off. The only thing that might retract or extract is the focusing ring unless the lens has an internal focusing system.

    Pro Lens is distinguish by the red band near the front of the lens.
    http://usa.canon.com/cusa/professional/products/lenses/ef_lens_lineup/lens_uw_pro/ef_16_35mm_f_2_8l_ii_usm

    http://www.canon.com/bctv/faq/if.html

    If for some reason the camera is not focusing when the focusing switch is on AUTO MODE then it is possible that the lens focusing mechanism is damage.


    Ah, thanks for the reply, and the info. The lenses I'm using is an ultra, 28-135. My main problem really is that when I'm trying to use the focus, the visual indicator on the lenses won't go past the part where there is an infinity symbol and an L shaped line. I want to go past that and avoid using the auto focus altogether, so I can set the focus range myself.
  3. you can rotate it past infinity in manual focus because the lens was designed that way.... so you'd have a little wiggle room at the end. Forcing it past infinity is NOT a good idea though and can damage your lens. Why would you want to focus past infinity? there is no way the subject you are attempting to focus on is infinitely far away.
  4. bob100684 said:
    you can rotate it past infinity in manual focus because the lens was designed that way.... so you'd have a little wiggle room at the end. Forcing it past infinity is NOT a good idea though and can damage your lens. Why would you want to focus past infinity? there is no way the subject you are attempting to focus on is infinitely far away.


    That's an amusing thought actually. I think I need to reiterate. I want to go below infinity, but it won't let me go past it.
  5. Alberio said:
    That's an amusing thought actually. I think I need to reiterate. I want to go below infinity, but it won't let me go past it.

    ok Looking down at my camera with a canon lens on, rotating the ring counterclockwise, I get to the infinity symbol. Are you trying to rotate counterclockwise PAST infinity? or clockwise so the infinity symbol moves off to the right of the distance scale window?
  6. bob100684 said:
    ok Looking down at my camera with a canon lens on, rotating the ring counterclockwise, I get to the infinity symbol. Are you trying to rotate counterclockwise PAST infinity? or clockwise so the infinity symbol moves off to the right of the distance scale window?


    I going right so the infinity symbol goes right of the window, but it won't let go any further than the "L__"
  7. Best answer
    Alberio said:
    I going right so the infinity symbol goes right of the window, but it won't let go any further than the "L__"

    ok. the L symbol is your lenses minimum focusing distance. the furthest object it can focus on is infinity and the closest is marked by the L. In the case of your 28-135, this distance is 19.7 inches measured from the plane of the sensor which is marked on your camera's top by an O with a line through it. Look to the right of the flash and a hair toward the back of the camera, its in white.
  8. bob100684 said:
    ok. the L symbol is your lenses minimum focusing distance. the furthest object it can focus on is infinity and the closest is marked by the L. In the case of your 28-135, this distance is 19.7 inches measured from the plane of the sensor which is marked on your camera's top by an O with a line through it. Look to the right of the flash and a hair toward the back of the camera, its in white.
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/41/Canon_EOS_50D_Top.jpg


    Alright, that makes sense now. But now I think I did something horribly wrong since at one point I was able to rotate the focus ring until it was on the numbers left of the L. At the same time though I was able to do shots much closer than the lenses were intended to do.
  9. Best answer selected by Alberio.
  10. Alberio said:
    Alright, that makes sense now. But now I think I did something horribly wrong since at one point I was able to rotate the focus ring until it was on the numbers left of the L. At the same time though I was able to do shots much closer than the lenses were intended to do.


    Sorry for the confusion, the 28-135 is not among my collection of canon lenses. I'm using a 24mm for refference which goes L numbers infinity sign from left to right.... if your lens has numbers L infinty sign and you can't get past the L and into the numbers, then something IS wrong with your lens.
  11. Check here on how the lens ring rotate from end ot end: http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Lens-Product-Images.aspx?Lens=116
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