Partitioning

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Just received an Inspiron 5150 with 40GB HD (C:) and DVD/CD-RW combo
drive (D:). Partitioned the C: drive using Partition Magic 8.0 and
wound up with the new partition as E:. How do I get the combo drive
to be E: and the new partition to be D:? Thanks.
15 answers Last reply
More about partitioning
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    sar130@columbia.edu wrote:
    >
    > Just received an Inspiron 5150 with 40GB HD (C:) and DVD/CD-RW combo
    > drive (D:). Partitioned the C: drive using Partition Magic 8.0 and
    > wound up with the new partition as E:. How do I get the combo drive
    > to be E: and the new partition to be D:? Thanks.

    - Right click "My Computer"
    - Select "Manage"
    - Select "Disk Management"
    - Right-click whatever drive you're working with and select "Change
    Drive Letter and Paths..."

    The rest, as they say, is all downhill!

    Larry
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    sar130@columbia.edu wrote in news:gkie705s1l9ev64tp5mn0vasc9k17kah1j@
    4ax.com:

    > Just received an Inspiron 5150 with 40GB HD (C:) and DVD/CD-RW combo
    > drive (D:). Partitioned the C: drive using Partition Magic 8.0 and
    > wound up with the new partition as E:. How do I get the combo drive
    > to be E: and the new partition to be D:? Thanks.

    I did that and thought it would be no big deal. It was a year or so ago,
    and I don't recall specifics, but there were already some settings for the
    DVD/CD drive as D: that were annoying, and I soon went back to the new
    partition being E:.

    --
    Tom McCune
    My PGP Page & FAQ: http://www.McCune.cc/PGP.htm
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Tom McCune wrote:

    > sar130@columbia.edu wrote in news:gkie705s1l9ev64tp5mn0vasc9k17kah1j@
    > 4ax.com:
    >
    >
    >>Just received an Inspiron 5150 with 40GB HD (C:) and DVD/CD-RW combo
    >>drive (D:). Partitioned the C: drive using Partition Magic 8.0 and
    >>wound up with the new partition as E:. How do I get the combo drive
    >>to be E: and the new partition to be D:? Thanks.
    >
    >
    > I did that and thought it would be no big deal. It was a year or so ago,
    > and I don't recall specifics, but there were already some settings for the
    > DVD/CD drive as D: that were annoying, and I soon went back to the new
    > partition being E:.

    That's been the standard since before I can remember, i.e., drive
    letters are assigned first to the real devices, C: & D:, then to any
    additional partions, E:. I don't think I'd try to monkey with that. Is
    it a problem for you?
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I always make my optical drives Q (and R if I have two) It gets them out of
    the way and harks back to the early days of DOS where the CD was assigned Q.

    tom
    "Gus" <GusPod@optOFFline.XXXX.net> wrote in message
    news:whMdc.6598$Eg.1402872@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > Tom McCune wrote:
    >
    > > sar130@columbia.edu wrote in news:gkie705s1l9ev64tp5mn0vasc9k17kah1j@
    > > 4ax.com:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Just received an Inspiron 5150 with 40GB HD (C:) and DVD/CD-RW combo
    > >>drive (D:). Partitioned the C: drive using Partition Magic 8.0 and
    > >>wound up with the new partition as E:. How do I get the combo drive
    > >>to be E: and the new partition to be D:? Thanks.
    > >
    > >
    > > I did that and thought it would be no big deal. It was a year or so
    ago,
    > > and I don't recall specifics, but there were already some settings for
    the
    > > DVD/CD drive as D: that were annoying, and I soon went back to the new
    > > partition being E:.
    >
    > That's been the standard since before I can remember, i.e., drive
    > letters are assigned first to the real devices, C: & D:, then to any
    > additional partions, E:. I don't think I'd try to monkey with that. Is
    > it a problem for you?
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Yes, make them X and Y if you like. Then change again to D and E.


    "Lawrence Glasser" <lglasser@spamcop.net> wrote in message
    news:40774C1D.D5657184@spamcop.net...
    > sar130@columbia.edu wrote:
    > >
    > > Just received an Inspiron 5150 with 40GB HD (C:) and DVD/CD-RW combo
    > > drive (D:). Partitioned the C: drive using Partition Magic 8.0 and
    > > wound up with the new partition as E:. How do I get the combo drive
    > > to be E: and the new partition to be D:? Thanks.
    >
    > - Right click "My Computer"
    > - Select "Manage"
    > - Select "Disk Management"
    > - Right-click whatever drive you're working with and select "Change
    > Drive Letter and Paths..."
    >
    > The rest, as they say, is all downhill!
    >
    > Larry
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Gus <GusPod@optOFFline.XXXX.net> wrote in news:whMdc.6598$Eg.1402872
    @news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net:

    > That's been the standard since before I can remember, i.e., drive
    > letters are assigned first to the real devices, C: & D:, then to any
    > additional partions, E:. I don't think I'd try to monkey with that. Is
    > it a problem for you?

    Obviously it is not a problem for me, or I wouldn't have expressed my
    preference for it by changeing to it. But doing so, does screw up software
    that has been installed to use the CD drive as D. I just found it easier
    to return the CD drive designation to the original setting.

    --
    Tom McCune
    My PGP Page & FAQ: http://www.McCune.cc/PGP.htm
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Tom McCune <news@DELETE_THISmccune.cc> wrote:

    >Gus <GusPod@optOFFline.XXXX.net> wrote:

    >> That's been the standard since before I can remember, i.e., drive
    >> letters are assigned first to the real devices, C: & D:, then to any
    >> additional partions, E:. I don't think I'd try to monkey with that. Is
    >> it a problem for you?

    >Obviously it is not a problem for me, or I wouldn't have expressed my
    >preference for it by changeing to it. But doing so, does screw up software
    >that has been installed to use the CD drive as D. I just found it easier
    >to return the CD drive designation to the original setting.

    Exactly. In Win9x implementations, adding logical drives by
    repartitioning with PM or whatever pushed the CD-ROM drive
    designations to the back of the list. Unfortunately, Windows
    remembered where it had been installed from, and every time you
    had to put the CD back in for Windows to find something it
    needed, you always got a "can't find it, tell me where it is"
    message that finally allowed you to tell it that the D: drive it
    had installed from and was looking for was now K:, and that's
    where it will find the factory CD.

    I was pleasantly surprised when, after partitioning my new D4400
    with XPPro, that D: and E:, my CD drives, remained D: and E:, and
    that the logical drives I established picked up with F:. Oh,
    frabjous joy; changing M$ stuff requiring the original CD be put
    in was no longer a major PITA.

    Another change from the Win9x practice: adding a second physical
    HD to a Win9x machine resulted in it getting the D: designation,
    with all the logical drives on the first HD going up a letter,
    then the logical drives for the second HD coming after those.
    [And pushing the CD drive even further away from where M$ would
    look for the factory CD. ;->] I just put a second HD in my
    D4400, and under XP it picked up where the first HD's partitions
    left off. No insisting on being D:.
    --
    OJ III
    [Email sent to Yahoo addy is burned before reading.
    Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast]
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 14:52:25 -0400, in alt.sys.pc-clone.dell, Ogden Johnson
    III <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >Another change from the Win9x practice: adding a second physical
    >HD to a Win9x machine resulted in it getting the D: designation,
    >with all the logical drives on the first HD going up a letter,
    >then the logical drives for the second HD coming after those.
    >[And pushing the CD drive even further away from where M$ would
    >look for the factory CD. ;->] I just put a second HD in my
    >D4400, and under XP it picked up where the first HD's partitions
    >left off. No insisting on being D:.

    The 'Win9x practice' was to assign drive letters to primary partitions on
    all hard drives before assigning letters to logical drives in extended
    partitions.

    Logical drives on the first hard drive would only change letters if you
    created a primary partition on the new drive.

    If you wanted to keep the drive letters for the first hard drive the same,
    you just needed to create an extended partition on the new drive instead of
    a primary partition. Then all the partitions on the first drive would have
    been assigned letters before the partitions on the second drive.

    --
    Nick <mailto:tanstaafl@pobox.com>
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Nick" <tanstaafl@pobox.com> wrote in message
    news:l33h70dakhtakqkde8em7dmae5qh30kmk7@4ax.com...
    >
    > On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 14:52:25 -0400, in alt.sys.pc-clone.dell, Ogden
    Johnson
    > III <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Another change from the Win9x practice: adding a second physical
    > >HD to a Win9x machine resulted in it getting the D: designation,
    > >with all the logical drives on the first HD going up a letter,
    > >then the logical drives for the second HD coming after those.
    > >[And pushing the CD drive even further away from where M$ would
    > >look for the factory CD. ;->] I just put a second HD in my
    > >D4400, and under XP it picked up where the first HD's partitions
    > >left off. No insisting on being D:.
    >
    > The 'Win9x practice' was to assign drive letters to primary partitions on
    > all hard drives before assigning letters to logical drives in extended
    > partitions.

    Are you sure that it wasn't the practice of assigning drive letters to
    primary partitions on all drives (hard or cd or whatever) before assigning
    letters elsewhere?

    I seem to always notice that (assuming only 1 partition per drive) the
    primary/master was always C: no matter what. And if something was on the
    secondary/master (no matter what it was) it became d:

    ....[thwack]...
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 04:55:18 GMT, in alt.sys.pc-clone.dell, "Thomas G.
    Marshall" <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Are you sure that it wasn't the practice of assigning drive letters to
    >primary partitions on all drives (hard or cd or whatever) before assigning
    >letters elsewhere?
    >
    >I seem to always notice that (assuming only 1 partition per drive) the
    >primary/master was always C: no matter what. And if something was on the
    >secondary/master (no matter what it was) it became d:

    Yes, I'm quite sure. :) CD-ROM drives were assigned drive letters after the
    internal hard drives.

    A common plea in Win9x newsgroups was: "I just added a new hard drive (or
    partitioned my existing drive), and now my CD-ROM drive letter is different
    and that broke a whole bunch of stuff. HELP!"

    This happened to me the first time I added a new hard drive to a PC with a
    CD-ROM drive. :( Ever since, I've made a habit of always changing the
    CD-ROM drive to 'M:' when I get a new computer; that leaves me lots of room
    to add new hard drive partitions without changing the CD-ROM letter.


    There were also regular pleas for help in the Win9x newsgroups from people
    who added a second hard drive and discovered that some of the partitions on
    their first hard drive (i.e., D: and above) wound up with new drive letters.
    (Caused by creating a primary partition on the new drive.) This also
    happened to me the first time I added a second hard drive to a PC.


    Note: the newer operating systems allow drive letters to be changed by the
    user, but I believe most current versions of Windows still default to the
    same letter sequence that has been used since MS-DOS days.


    Here's part (somewhat edited) of a canned post I used to post regularly when
    I was hanging around in Win9x newsgroups:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Here's some more detailed information on how drive letters are assigned:

    The first floppy disk drive will always be 'A:', a second floppy (if
    present) will be always be 'B:'.

    When MS-DOS/Win9x starts up, it assigns drive letter C: to the first primary
    partition on the master drive on IDE channel 0. Then it assigns drive
    letters in sequence to the first primary partition (if any) on additional
    internal hard drives.

    Once the first primary partition on each drive is assigned a drive letter,
    then the OS starts over with logical drives in extended partitions. Any
    logical drives on the first physical drive are assigned letters first, then
    the logical drives on each additional physical drive in sequence.

    After the first primary partitions and all the logical drives in extended
    partitions are assigned letters, the OS then assigns letters to any
    additional primary partitions on the hard drives, starting with the master
    drive.

    Once all the hard drives are done, the OS then assigns letters to CD-ROM
    drives, Zip drives, etc.

    So if you have two physical hard drives you can, to some extent, change the
    order in which drive letters are assigned by choosing which type of
    partition(s) will be on each drive. You have to have at least one primary
    partition on your master (boot) drive; on the slave drive it's optional.

    CD-ROM letter drive letters will always be assigned *after* the hard
    drive letters. You can go into Device Manager and specify the drive
    letters for CD-ROMs. On a new system, I usually set my CD-ROM drive to a
    high letter (M:, for example) so it doesn't get changed if I add a new hard
    drive or create more partitions.)

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I'm not sure about the order for external USB/Firewire drives, but they were
    probably done after all the internal IDE/SCSI drives (of whatever type).
    And I have no idea about the order used when a system has both IDE and SCSI
    drives; I would _guess_ that the IDE drives would have been assigned letters
    first, but that's just a guess.

    --
    Nick <mailto:tanstaafl@pobox.com>

    "Natural laws have no pity." R.A.H.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Nick <tanstaafl@pobox.com> wrote:

    >Note: the newer operating systems allow drive letters to be changed by the
    >user, but I believe most current versions of Windows still default to the
    >same letter sequence that has been used since MS-DOS days.

    Wrong. I can't speak to NT4/Win2K/WinMe, because I have never
    added a second drive to any one of those systems. But, with my
    D4400 running under XPPro, when I used PM to partition the
    physical C:\ drive into several logical partitions, unlike my
    previous experience with doing the same under Win9x versions, my
    CDs retained their D:\ and E:\ designations and the logical
    drives I created picked up with F:\. By default, under any
    definition of default I am familiar with.

    When I installed a second physical HD, it, by default under XP,
    was recognized as L:\. following K:\ a portable ZIP drive, and
    J:\, the last logical drive on my original HD. When I
    partitioned that with PM 7, the drives in the logical partition
    picked up at K:. Again, by default, under any definition of
    default I am familiar with.

    So, although I don't know what the "current versions of Windows"
    labeled NT4, 2000, and ME "default to", WinXP doesn't "default to
    the same letter sequence that has been used since MS-DOS days."
    --
    OJ III
    [Email sent to Yahoo address is burned before reading.
    Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Nick" <tanstaafl@pobox.com> coughed up the following...
    news:6s73805ii394kf4o9461jatkmjh8is7qku@4ax.com...

    ....[thwack]...


    > Note: the newer operating systems allow drive letters to be changed by
    the
    > user, but I believe most current versions of Windows still default to
    the
    > same letter sequence that has been used since MS-DOS days.

    By default, my WinXP installation ordered C, D, and E: this way:

    primary/master (HD)
    secondary/master (DVD)
    primary/slave (HD)

    Thanks for the historical info! I'd forgotten all that!

    Thomas
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 23:23:57 GMT, in alt.sys.pc-clone.dell, "Thomas G.
    Marshall" <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote:

    >"Nick" <tanstaafl@pobox.com> coughed up the following...
    >news:6s73805ii394kf4o9461jatkmjh8is7qku@4ax.com...
    >
    >> Note: the newer operating systems allow drive letters to be changed by
    >the
    >> user, but I believe most current versions of Windows still default to
    >the
    >> same letter sequence that has been used since MS-DOS days.
    >
    >By default, my WinXP installation ordered C, D, and E: this way:
    >
    > primary/master (HD)
    > secondary/master (DVD)
    > primary/slave (HD)

    I stand corrected! :)

    --
    Nick <mailto:tanstaafl@pobox.com>
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    My WinXP Home, when I partitioned the HD, my DVD & DVD R/W drives,
    remained D: and E: drives and the HD became c: f: g: & h:. When I added
    the second hard drive, it became i:. When I used Ghost to image my
    original drive to the 2nd internal drive, that drive when connected
    became i: j: k: l:. Currently, the 2nd internal HD is not connected and
    I have an external firewire HD which Windows calls i:, as I have not
    partitioned this external drive. All my HD's are 120 gig and formatted
    to Fat32, my preference.

    As for me, I'm glad that WinXP will keep my DVD/CD drives the same and
    both WinXP and PM adjust to the hard drives as I connect them. I have a
    lot of games that probably would not play properly if I tried to assign
    the DVD/CD drives to other letters.


    Ogden Johnson III wrote:
    > Nick <tanstaafl@pobox.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Note: the newer operating systems allow drive letters to be changed by the
    >>user, but I believe most current versions of Windows still default to the
    >>same letter sequence that has been used since MS-DOS days.
    >
    >
    > Wrong. I can't speak to NT4/Win2K/WinMe, because I have never
    > added a second drive to any one of those systems. But, with my
    > D4400 running under XPPro, when I used PM to partition the
    > physical C:\ drive into several logical partitions, unlike my
    > previous experience with doing the same under Win9x versions, my
    > CDs retained their D:\ and E:\ designations and the logical
    > drives I created picked up with F:\. By default, under any
    > definition of default I am familiar with.
    >
    > When I installed a second physical HD, it, by default under XP,
    > was recognized as L:\. following K:\ a portable ZIP drive, and
    > J:\, the last logical drive on my original HD. When I
    > partitioned that with PM 7, the drives in the logical partition
    > picked up at K:. Again, by default, under any definition of
    > default I am familiar with.
    >
    > So, although I don't know what the "current versions of Windows"
    > labeled NT4, 2000, and ME "default to", WinXP doesn't "default to
    > the same letter sequence that has been used since MS-DOS days."
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    > Nick <tanstaafl@pobox.com> wrote:
    > > Note: the newer operating systems allow drive letters to be
    > > changed by the user, but I believe most current versions of
    > > Windows still default to the same letter sequence that has
    > > been used since MS-DOS days.
    >
    "Ogden Johnson III" <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > Wrong. I can't speak to NT4/Win2K/WinMe, because I have
    > never added a second drive to any one of those systems. But,
    > with my D4400 running under XPPro, when I used PM to
    > partition the physical C:\ drive into several logical partitions,
    > unlike my previous experience with doing the same under
    > Win9x versions, my CDs retained their D:\ and E:\ designations
    > and the logical drives I created picked up with F:\. By default,
    > under any definition of default I am familiar with.
    >
    > When I installed a second physical HD, it, by default under XP,
    > was recognized as L:\. following K:\ a portable ZIP drive, and
    > J:\, the last logical drive on my original HD. When I
    > partitioned that with PM 7, the drives in the logical partition
    > picked up at K:. Again, by default, under any definition of
    > default I am familiar with.

    And therein lies the key, Ogden -- different meanings of "default". What Nick
    means by default is how drive letters are assigned in a fresh system with no
    previous assignments. In contrast, each of your examples is about adding
    partitions to a pre-installed OS and what the new partitions will "default to"
    in that pre-installed system.

    Since DOS/9x didn't "remember" drive letters, they were assigned anew at every
    boot, so adding partitions to a pre-installed Win9x system would result in
    drive letters moving around. We all agree on that part. (FTR, the sequence is
    delineated in KB51978.)

    If you are installing a NT-family OS on a brand new system with multiple
    partitions, I think you'll find the default drive letters, as Nick says, will
    follow the old MS-DOS/Win9x sequence.

    In a pre-existing NT-family OS, though, previously assigned drive letters are
    "remembered" and not reassigned. However, *new* partitions will be assigned
    "default" drive letters (and subsequently remembered) as per Nick's summary,
    with the caveat that they must skip over letters already assigned. IOW,
    NT-family OS's don't reassign the previous defaults, but do follow the default
    rules for newly discovered partitions.

    BTW, NT-family OS's remember drive letters by associating (and recording in the
    registry) the drive letter with the partition's "signature". The signature is
    derived from the DiskID (a 4-byte code in the disk's master boot sector) and
    the starting sector number of the partition itself. Accordingly, any existing
    partition will lose its remembered drive letter (and be reassigned at the next
    boot, per Nick's sequence while skipping over letters not being changed) if the
    DiskID is changed or if the starting location of the partition is changed
    (e.g., as often happens if partitions are resized). That's why sometimes the
    drive letters seem to "stick" and sometimes they don't.
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