Sign-in / Sign-up
Your question

transferring ownership

Tags:
  • Microsoft
  • Computers
  • CD-Rom
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 11:38:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different OS, but
a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having lots of problem.

I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his neck,
asking him where it came from, and such.

What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it on his
computer to prevent the above from happening?

More about : transferring ownership

August 8, 2005 12:41:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt wrote:

> An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different OS, but
> a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having lots of problem.
>
> I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his neck,
> asking him where it came from, and such.
>
> What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it on his
> computer to prevent the above from happening?

If it's an OEM version, per the EULA it's bound to the first computer on
which it's installed and can't be moved to a different one. If it's
retail, then no problems - just give it to him.

--
Rock
MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 1:50:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

OEM versions of Windows XP are non-transferable.
The license is tied directly to the computer it was
originally installed on. It will not activate on a different
computer.

--
Carey Frisch
Microsoft MVP
Windows XP - Shell/User
Microsoft Newsgroups

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt" wrote:

| An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different OS, but
| a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having lots of problem.
|
| I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his neck,
| asking him where it came from, and such.
|
| What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it on his
| computer to prevent the above from happening?
Related resources
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 4:05:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Everyone else is arguing whether or not it can legally be done, and they
have missed the most important part of your post. Your friend is having
lots of problems with windows 98 SE. Just switching over to XP via any
avenue will NOT help him (or her) a bit until the primary problem (whatever
that might be) is taken care of. You might want to post some detail about
what it is doing, and get some help to get it running decently in 98 before
trying to upgrade.

"John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt" <John Jacob Jingleheimer
Schmidt@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:819E098B-5FA0-4F7D-9879-749BD82AD06F@microsoft.com...
> An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different OS,
> but
> a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having lots of
> problem.
>
> I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his neck,
> asking him where it came from, and such.
>
> What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it on
> his
> computer to prevent the above from happening?
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 4:56:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In news:819E098B-5FA0-4F7D-9879-749BD82AD06F@microsoft.com,
John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt <John Jacob Jingleheimer
Schmidt@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

> An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a
> different
> OS, but a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is
> having
> lots of problem.
>
> I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing
> down his
> neck, asking him where it came from, and such.
>
> What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and
> installing it
> on his computer to prevent the above from happening?


First of all, note that any copy of Windows that's not a volume
license is licensed for a single machine. The license prohibits
your putting it on two machines.

Second, if it came with your computer, it may be BIOS-locked to
your computer, and not work on his at all.

Third, if it came with your computer, it's an OEM version and its
license ties it permanently to the first machine it's installed
on. Even if you took it off your machine and it physically worked
on his, you're not permitted to do this.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 7:24:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Also note that OEM edition will not do Upgrades. You will have to format
the hard drive as part of the XP Home installation. This will delete all
files.


"Jone Doe" <fake@nowhere.org> wrote in message
news:u9gsitDnFHA.3408@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Everyone else is arguing whether or not it can legally be done, and they
> have missed the most important part of your post. Your friend is having
> lots of problems with windows 98 SE. Just switching over to XP via any
> avenue will NOT help him (or her) a bit until the primary problem
> (whatever that might be) is taken care of. You might want to post some
> detail about what it is doing, and get some help to get it running
> decently in 98 before trying to upgrade.
>
> "John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt" <John Jacob Jingleheimer
> Schmidt@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:819E098B-5FA0-4F7D-9879-749BD82AD06F@microsoft.com...
>> An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different OS,
>> but
>> a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having lots of
>> problem.
>>
>> I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his
>> neck,
>> asking him where it came from, and such.
>>
>> What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it on
>> his
>> computer to prevent the above from happening?
>
>
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 7:28:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Oem versions have to be sold with some piece of hardware. You can do
upgrades on your computer and still use that CD so the question of what
hardware is tied to the CD is open to your interpretation.

So if you really want to stay compliant with the MS EULA (or even care since
it's a total joke anyway) when you give your friend your copy of WinXP give
him a piece of hardware as well. You know that little cable that runs from
your cd-rom to the motherboard so you can hear cd's directly from the cd-rom
and only costs about a buck? That's all it takes to be compliant with the
EULA.

There are websites that sell the OEM CD by itself but toss that cable in for
free so they can be compliant with the whole 'hardware' issue. Just consider
It to be the original hardware that is forever linked to the WinXP CD as
described in the EULA. The rest of your friends computer is just upgraded
parts. That's all it takes.

Oh, be sure to sell it to him for the cost of his cable from his computer so
you can put that one in your computer.



"Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
news:o F8U1MFnFHA.3568@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> In news:819E098B-5FA0-4F7D-9879-749BD82AD06F@microsoft.com,
> John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt <John Jacob Jingleheimer
> Schmidt@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
>
>> An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different
>> OS, but a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having
>> lots of problem.
>>
>> I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his
>> neck, asking him where it came from, and such.
>>
>> What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it
>> on his computer to prevent the above from happening?
>
>
> First of all, note that any copy of Windows that's not a volume license is
> licensed for a single machine. The license prohibits your putting it on
> two machines.
>
> Second, if it came with your computer, it may be BIOS-locked to your
> computer, and not work on his at all.
>
> Third, if it came with your computer, it's an OEM version and its license
> ties it permanently to the first machine it's installed on. Even if you
> took it off your machine and it physically worked on his, you're not
> permitted to do this.
>
> --
> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
> Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 7:28:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In news:%23Ymc5eFnFHA.2472@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
Jack Handey <nothere@overthere.com> typed:

> Oem versions have to be sold with some piece of hardware. You
> can do
> upgrades on your computer and still use that CD so the question
> of
> what hardware is tied to the CD is open to your interpretation.
>
> So if you really want to stay compliant with the MS EULA (or
> even
> care since it's a total joke anyway) when you give your friend
> your
> copy of WinXP give him a piece of hardware as well. You know
> that
> little cable that runs from your cd-rom to the motherboard so
> you can
> hear cd's directly from the cd-rom and only costs about a buck?
> That's all it takes to be compliant with the EULA.


No, this is *not* correct. You can buy it with almost any piece
of hardware initially, but the EULA requires that once it's
installed, it can never be transferred except with the machine
it's originally installed on.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup


>
> There are websites that sell the OEM CD by itself but toss that
> cable
> in for free so they can be compliant with the whole 'hardware'
> issue.
> Just consider It to be the original hardware that is forever
> linked
> to the WinXP CD as described in the EULA. The rest of your
> friends
> computer is just upgraded parts. That's all it takes.
>
> Oh, be sure to sell it to him for the cost of his cable from
> his
> computer so you can put that one in your computer.
>
>
>
> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
> news:o F8U1MFnFHA.3568@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> In news:819E098B-5FA0-4F7D-9879-749BD82AD06F@microsoft.com,
>> John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt <John Jacob Jingleheimer
>> Schmidt@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
>>
>>> An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a
>>> different OS, but a friend of mine is using *groan* windows
>>> 98 SE
>>> and is having lots of problem.
>>>
>>> I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing
>>> down his
>>> neck, asking him where it came from, and such.
>>>
>>> What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and
>>> installing it
>>> on his computer to prevent the above from happening?
>>
>>
>> First of all, note that any copy of Windows that's not a
>> volume
>> license is licensed for a single machine. The license
>> prohibits your
>> putting it on two machines.
>>
>> Second, if it came with your computer, it may be BIOS-locked
>> to your
>> computer, and not work on his at all.
>>
>> Third, if it came with your computer, it's an OEM version and
>> its
>> license ties it permanently to the first machine it's
>> installed on.
>> Even if you took it off your machine and it physically worked
>> on
>> his, you're not permitted to do this.
>>
>> --
>> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>> Please reply to the newsgroup
August 8, 2005 8:52:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt" wrote

> An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different OS,
> but
> a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having lots of
> problem.
>
> I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his neck,
> asking him where it came from, and such.
>
> What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it on
> his
> computer to prevent the above from happening?

If it's a generic OEM version and it's been over 120 days since the computer
that now houses the XP HE, you can just give it to him and he can install
it, update it and enjoy it. If it's been less time, your friend may have to
make a phone call to MS and tell them he "upgraded" his machine. If it's a
retail version of XP HE, you can give it to him with MS's blessings. What
you do with your own property is not the business of MS, regardless of what
their never proven to be legal EULA says.

If it's a restore disk, not a generic OEM or retail version, it will only
work on your computer.

Alias
August 8, 2005 8:55:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
news:o Dtu9hCnFHA.3304@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> OEM versions of Windows XP are non-transferable.
> The license is tied directly to the computer it was
> originally installed on. It will not activate on a different
> computer.
>
> --
> Carey Frisch
> Microsoft MVP
> Windows XP - Shell/User
> Microsoft Newsgroups

Why do you LIE!? If it's a generic OEM and it's been over 120 days since the
last hardware change, it can be installed, activated and validated on any
computer that can handle XP and you know it! Only OEM versions that are
bundled with HP/Packard Bell/et al are "tied to the computer it was
originally installed on".

Alias
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> "John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt" wrote:
>
> | An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different
> OS, but
> | a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having lots of
> problem.
> |
> | I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his
> neck,
> | asking him where it came from, and such.
> |
> | What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it on
> his
> | computer to prevent the above from happening?
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 8:55:10 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

OEM licenses are single-use licenses that cannot be installed on more than
one computer system even if the original machine is no longer in use. The end
user license agreement (EULA) accepted by the customer before they use the
software, states that the license may not be shared, transferred to or used
concurrently on different computers. The OEM is required to provide end-user
support for the Windows license. An OEM can not support a license that has
been moved from a PC they manufactured to one that they did not — this is a
fundamental reason why OEM licenses can't be transferred.

--
Carey Frisch
Microsoft MVP
Windows XP - Shell/User


"Alias" wrote:

> Why do you LIE!? If it's a generic OEM and it's been over 120 days since the
> last hardware change, it can be installed, activated and validated on any
> computer that can handle XP and you know it! Only OEM versions that are
> bundled with HP/Packard Bell/et al are "tied to the computer it was
> originally installed on".
>
> Alias
August 8, 2005 9:30:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Carey Frisch [MVP]" <mrxp2004@nospamyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:62852BBC-4B2D-4BE5-8740-EDF3A3264B36@microsoft.com...
> OEM licenses are single-use licenses that cannot be installed on more than
> one computer system even if the original machine is no longer in use.

First lie as they *can*. You should word it, "MS doesn't want you to move it
but, technically, it can be done."

> The end
> user license agreement (EULA) accepted by the customer before they use the
> software, states that the license may not be shared, transferred to or
> used
> concurrently on different computers.

Not the law and if you elect to not accept the force-fed EULA, you can't get
your money back. Heard of Catch 22, Carey?

> The OEM is required to provide end-user
> support for the Windows license. An OEM can not support a license that has
> been moved from a PC they manufactured to one that they did not — this
> is a
> fundamental reason why OEM licenses can't be transferred.
>
> --
> Carey Frisch
> Microsoft MVP
> Windows XP - Shell/User

Second lie. They *can* be transferred and it isn't illegal until MS takes
someone to court who loses which will never happen.

Alias


>
>
> "Alias" wrote:
>
>> Why do you LIE!? If it's a generic OEM and it's been over 120 days since
>> the
>> last hardware change, it can be installed, activated and validated on any
>> computer that can handle XP and you know it! Only OEM versions that are
>> bundled with HP/Packard Bell/et al are "tied to the computer it was
>> originally installed on".
>>
>> Alias
>
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 9:30:38 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

If the OP does "transfer" the XP Home, then they may "void" the warranty of
their PC. Their PC came with XP Home and that may be part of the
requirement of the warranty. Also, if they did do an upgrade to XP Pro,
from XP Home, then the XP Home license is "integrated" with the Pro license.


"Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
news:%231fcg4CnFHA.708@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>
> "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <mrxp2004@nospamyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:62852BBC-4B2D-4BE5-8740-EDF3A3264B36@microsoft.com...
>> OEM licenses are single-use licenses that cannot be installed on more
>> than
>> one computer system even if the original machine is no longer in use.
>
> First lie as they *can*. You should word it, "MS doesn't want you to move
> it but, technically, it can be done."
>
>> The end
>> user license agreement (EULA) accepted by the customer before they use
>> the
>> software, states that the license may not be shared, transferred to or
>> used
>> concurrently on different computers.
>
> Not the law and if you elect to not accept the force-fed EULA, you can't
> get your money back. Heard of Catch 22, Carey?
>
>> The OEM is required to provide end-user
>> support for the Windows license. An OEM can not support a license that
>> has
>> been moved from a PC they manufactured to one that they did not â?" this
>> is a
>> fundamental reason why OEM licenses can't be transferred.
>>
>> --
>> Carey Frisch
>> Microsoft MVP
>> Windows XP - Shell/User
>
> Second lie. They *can* be transferred and it isn't illegal until MS takes
> someone to court who loses which will never happen.
>
> Alias
>
>
>>
>>
>> "Alias" wrote:
>>
>>> Why do you LIE!? If it's a generic OEM and it's been over 120 days since
>>> the
>>> last hardware change, it can be installed, activated and validated on
>>> any
>>> computer that can handle XP and you know it! Only OEM versions that are
>>> bundled with HP/Packard Bell/et al are "tied to the computer it was
>>> originally installed on".
>>>
>>> Alias
>>
>
>
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 11:00:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt wrote:
> An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different OS, but
> a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having lots of problem.
>
> I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his neck,
> asking him where it came from, and such.
>
> What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it on his
> computer to prevent the above from happening?


Give him the entire computer. You have an OEM license, which is
*permanently* bound to the computer with which it was purchased. The
only legitimate way to transfer ownership of that OEM WinXP license is
to transfer ownership of the entire computer.


--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 6:05:07 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

=?Utf-8?B?Sm9obiBKYWNvYiBKaW5nbGVoZWltZXIgU2NobWlkdA==?= wrote:
>
> An XP home edition CD came with my computer. I know use a different OS, but
> a friend of mine is using *groan* windows 98 SE and is having lots of problem.

98SE is a most excellent OS. Also note that you dont upgrade your OS to
fix existing problems with your current OS. Find out what is causing the
problems first or your friend may be worse off. For example, I've often
seen cases like this, and the "problems" with 98SE was that the owner
kept installing old win95 drivers and software, thus causing the
problems. Give your buddy XP and what, he'll go put on nortons that he
got for his old win95?

Are his problems hardware related? Mismatched ram perhaps? If so, then
XP will run even worse or not at all.


> I want to give him my CD but don't want microsoft breathing down his neck,
> asking him where it came from, and such.
>
> What would I need to do prior to giving him the CD and installing it on his
> computer to prevent the above from happening?

--
http://www.bootdisk.com/