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SSD booting slow

Last response: in Windows 7
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October 17, 2012 2:15:01 PM

I just bought a Vertex 4 SSD. And I copied everything from my old HDD to the SSD. But when I boot it doesn't boot as fast as other SSD's I have seen. I think it might be the Boot Files that are for HDD's and not for SSD's. Please tell me how to get the right files or whatever.

Thanks,
TheCheeseling

More about : ssd booting slow

a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 2:23:44 PM

You have to unhook the HDD and install Windows onto the SSD, you can't just transfer system files over...
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October 17, 2012 2:27:00 PM

I already did transfer Windows over, is there a way to reset the boot files or something so that it is compatible with the SSD?
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 2:41:29 PM

If you installed with the HDD plugged in, it may have split some of the system files to the HDD, slowing your boot times. It is best to install with only the SSD plugged in.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 3:23:23 PM

Yes, to install Windows on the SSD in the manner I described... You also probably had to change the boot device to the SSD in the BIOS but I do not know how well that program will do to prevent the MOBO from accessing the HDD at all on boot up. That is why you do a fresh install on the SSD without an HDD plugged in, so there is no risk of any files being placed on the other. If anything does go there, it will need to access the HDD during boot up, resulting in slower boot times.
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October 17, 2012 3:34:25 PM

So the only way to make it go faster is to buy a copy of Windows 7 and wipe the SSD then unplug the HDD and install Windows 7?
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 3:38:10 PM

Don't you already have a copy of Windows? If you never bought one, and were using an illegal copy, you won't get help here.
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October 17, 2012 3:46:18 PM

I had one already installed on my HDD, and then I bought the SDD, and copied everything over with the product I had mentioned earlier.
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October 17, 2012 3:49:16 PM

I have the Windows 7 product on the side of my case, is there a way I can use it again? That's why I bought the Apricon, because I thought the product key was only a one time use.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 3:49:44 PM

You cannot simply move windows over. More than likely you are still booting from your hard drive; or if you used a "transfer utility" you are indeed configured differently for a mechanical drive.

Backup any files on the SSD to your old hard drive.
Disconnect your hard drive.
Access BIOS and switch your SATA mode to AHCI (rather than IDE mode) if needed.
Insert your windows 7 disc, install it to your SSD (do a quick format to get rid of stuff you copied earlier, as long as it's backed up on the other drive).
Configure your boot order in BIOS to put the SSD as the first hard drive to boot from.
Reconnect your hard drive and copy any personal files over to the new windows install.
Backing up all files from the old hard drive, and formatting it is probably a good idea to reduce confusion and wasted space, but isn't necessary.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 3:50:51 PM

It is probably an OEM copy of Windows and is tied to your MOBO, not to your HDD, so the key is re-usable on that specific machine.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 3:53:13 PM

TheCheeseling said:
I have the Windows 7 product on the side of my case, is there a way I can use it again? That's why I bought the Apricon, because I thought the product key was only a one time use.


You can use that license again. (may require a call to microsoft) It's an OEM license so it's tied to the Motherboard on that specific pc. You can do any other hardware changes as long as the mobo is the same.

Install windows 7 on the ssd like they said. Use the product key on the side of your case. If it does not activate call Microsoft activation and explain that the only part you changed was you switched the hdd for an ssd and they will walk you through activating it :) .
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October 17, 2012 3:53:36 PM

If you already own a copy of Win 7 from the other drive just install it on the new drive. You don't need to unplug the old drive to install on the SSD, just make sure that AHCI is enabled in the BIOS before you install.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 3:55:07 PM

Thefigus said:
If you already own a copy of Win 7 from the other drive just install it on the new drive. You don't need to unplug the old drive to install on the SSD, just make sure that AHCI is enabled in the BIOS before you install.


You don't "have" to. But it's a much MUCH better practice to just unplug the hdd and install with only the ssd plugged in.
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October 17, 2012 4:02:25 PM

I am not a real nerd on all this stuff, but how do I install and activate Windows if the SSD is formatted and I don't have a disk? When the Computer came and I turned it on it asked for the Product key on the side of the case. I didn't get a install disk.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 4:10:03 PM

TheCheeseling said:
I am not a real nerd on all this stuff, but how do I install and activate Windows if the SSD is formatted and I don't have a disk? When the Computer came and I turned it on it asked for the Product key on the side of the case. I didn't get a install disk.


Your going to need a disk. Any friends or family that would have one? Also make sure it's the same version. Assuming you have windows 7 home... Make sure to get a win 7 home disk. Find a tech savvy friend or something and im sure they have a copy they can burn for you or something.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 4:12:38 PM

Any "same version" OS disk will do.

If you have an existing HD with Windows on it plugged in when you are installing to the SSD, the installation process will see this and want to take over the install process. To avoid this:

1. Open the case, and unplug the data cable to the HD (likely plugged into SATA 0 port)
2. Install the SSD and connect it to SATA 0 port
3. Install Windows to the SSD using your product key.
4. Run Windows Update 5 or 6 times, whatever is required, till it says no new updates.
5. Plug the HD in to SATA 1 port

If you did not let Windows manage your installs and installed programs / games whatever in their own folders (i.e. C:\Winzip instead of C:\Windows\ProgramFiles\Winzip you can install right over them in order to keep all your custom settings. If ya did this, you can also leave the old Windows install on there and you can still boot from the HD if teh SSD "goes south".


BTW, the activation process is a bit more complicated than "it's tied to your MoBo. It is possible to change a MoBo and not have to buy a new copy. It depends on the hardware hash and actually how many things have changed. There's not a lot written about the process these days with Win7 but when 1st introduced (WinXP) there was a ton of articles on the subject, some of which are linked below,

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb457054.asp...

http://www.helpwithwindows.com/WindowsXP/activation.htm...

Quote:
If the PC is not dockable and a network adapter exists and is not changed, 6 or more of the other above values would have to change before reactivation would be required. If a network adapter existed but is changed or never existed at all, 4 or more changes (including the changed network adapter if it previously existed) will require a reactivation.

The change of a single component multiple times (e.g. from display adapter A to display adapter B to display adapter C) is treated as a single change. The addition of components to a PC (adding a second hard drive) which did not exist during the original activation, would not trigger a reactivation. Reactivation would not be triggered by the modification of a component not listed above.

Reinstallation of Windows XP on the same or similar hardware and a subsequent reactivation can be accomplished an infinite number of times. Finally, the Microsoft activation clearinghouse system will automatically allow activation to occur over the Internet four times in one year on substantially different hardware. Every 120 days, the current configuration of a user's PC will become the new "base," so to speak. This means (for example) that on a non-dockable PC you could change 8 of the above parts without a reactivation. After 120 days, you could again change 8 parts. This last feature was implemented to allow even the most savvy power users to make changes to their systems and, if they must reactivate, do so over the Internet rather than necessitating a telephone call.
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Best solution

a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 4:14:58 PM

So your original hard disk will have a recovery partition. You will want to start by burning a set of recovery disks. This process is different for each manufacturer, there should be something in your notifications area (by clock), action center (the little flag notification icon by the clock), or in your start menu (in a folder created by your computer maker) to do this. It's best to make these right away when you get a PC in case the hard drive crashes.

Once you've made the factory restore discs. You'll need to make a clean windows install disk; then you should be able to do a clean install of windows 7 (as I described above) using your OEM license. Instructions for that are here: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/219487-clean-reins...

You will have to read your windows sticker to see what version your license is for (32 bit win7 home professional for example) and download that specific version. (32 bit is often called x86; 64bit would then be x64)

edit: Also, if you are referred to a phone activation, it is no problem, just call the number given and usually you are up and running in a couple of minutes. Everything you are doing is legal (to the best of my knowledge).
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October 17, 2012 4:21:47 PM

djscribbles said:
So your original hard disk will have a recovery partition. You will want to start by burning a set of recovery disks. This process is different for each manufacturer, there should be something in your notifications area (by clock), action center (the little flag notification icon by the clock), or in your start menu (in a folder created by your computer maker) to do this. It's best to make these right away when you get a PC in case the hard drive crashes.

Once you've made the factory restore discs. You'll need to make a clean windows install disk; then you should be able to do a clean install of windows 7 using your OEM license. Instructions for that are here: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/219487-clean-reins...

You will have to read your windows sticker to see what version your license is for (32 bit win7 home professional for example) and download that specific version. (32 bit is often called x86; 64bit would then be x64)

edit: Also, if you are referred to a phone activation, it is no problem, just call the number given and usually you are up and running in a couple of minutes. Everything you are doing is legal (to the best of my knowledge).


So I could do it your way, or I could wipe my SSD, get a Windows 7 install disk, and type in my product key.
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October 17, 2012 4:23:12 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
Any "same version" OS disk will do.

If you have an existing HD with Windows on it plugged in when you are installing to the SSD, the installation process will see this and want to take over the install process. To avoid this:

1. Open the case, and unplug the data cable to the HD (likely plugged into SATA 0 port)
2. Install the SSD and connect it to SATA 0 port
3. Install Windows to the SSD using your product key.
4. Run Windows Update 5 or 6 times, whatever is required, till it says no new updates.
5. Plug the HD in to SATA 1 port

If you did not let Windows manage your installs and installed programs / games whatever in their own folders (i.e. C:\Winzip instead of C:\Windows\ProgramFiles\Winzip you can install right over them in order to keep all your custom settings. If ya did this, you can also leave the old Windows install on there and you can still boot from the HD if teh SSD "goes south".


BTW, the activation process is a bit more complicated than "it's tied to your MoBo. It is possible to change a MoBo and not have to buy a new copy. It depends on the hardware hash and actually how many things have changed. There's not a lot written about the process these days with Win7 but when 1st introduced (WinXP) there was a ton of articles on the subject, some of which are linked below,

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb457054.asp...

http://www.helpwithwindows.com/WindowsXP/activation.htm...

Quote:
If the PC is not dockable and a network adapter exists and is not changed, 6 or more of the other above values would have to change before reactivation would be required. If a network adapter existed but is changed or never existed at all, 4 or more changes (including the changed network adapter if it previously existed) will require a reactivation.

The change of a single component multiple times (e.g. from display adapter A to display adapter B to display adapter C) is treated as a single change. The addition of components to a PC (adding a second hard drive) which did not exist during the original activation, would not trigger a reactivation. Reactivation would not be triggered by the modification of a component not listed above.

Reinstallation of Windows XP on the same or similar hardware and a subsequent reactivation can be accomplished an infinite number of times. Finally, the Microsoft activation clearinghouse system will automatically allow activation to occur over the Internet four times in one year on substantially different hardware. Every 120 days, the current configuration of a user's PC will become the new "base," so to speak. This means (for example) that on a non-dockable PC you could change 8 of the above parts without a reactivation. After 120 days, you could again change 8 parts. This last feature was implemented to allow even the most savvy power users to make changes to their systems and, if they must reactivate, do so over the Internet rather than necessitating a telephone call.


I tried that and it didn't work, do I have to format the SSD?
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a b $ Windows 7
October 17, 2012 4:31:56 PM

TheCheeseling said:
So I could do it your way, or I could wipe my SSD, get a Windows 7 install disk, and type in my product key.



Not quite. Making the recovery disks is just good practice (though it is optional, and not directly related to what you are trying to accomplish). They will restore your computer to what it was when you first bought it (but it is still not going to be setup for the SSD like you want). If you choose to sell the computer or something, you'll want to be able to put it back to it's factory condition.
Once you've made the recovery discs, I'd suggest putting them in a CD sleeve(s) and securing them inside the computer (that way you won't lose them and anyone who works on the PC will have access to them).
Once you've made the discs, you can get rid of your recovery partition if you need extra space on the old hard drive (and you take good care not to lose/damage the discs).



The link I provided above gives instructions on what you need to do to clean install windows yourself and it will automatically configure for the optimal SSD settings (as long as you set AHCI mode in bios before installing). It provides a link to windows 7 iso files (provided by microsoft), which you will burn to a dvd and use to install.
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October 17, 2012 11:22:03 PM

Thank you soo much for your advise everyone,
I finally figured it out, this is what I did.
1. Went to this website and downloaded the program: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/31541-windows-7-us...[2]=General%20Tips

2. Went to this website and downloaded the right ISO file:
http://www.mydigitallife.info/official-windows-7-sp1-is...

3. Copied the ISO to a Flash Drive via the Windows 7 tool.

4. Shut down my machine, and unplugged my old drive.

5. Went into the BIOS and changed IDE to AHCI.

6. Booted through the USB flash drive.

7. Followed the instructions.

8. And that was that. The only set back was I had to re-install all of my stuff, which wasn't hard, and move my folders I had on my old drive over to my new one.

THANK ALL OF YOU GUYS SOO MUCH I LEARNED A LOT AND GOT WHAT I WANTED.

TheCheeseling
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a b $ Windows 7
October 18, 2012 12:27:23 PM

I'm glad it worked out for you without any hassle :) 
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October 25, 2012 3:31:00 AM

Best answer selected by thecheeseling.
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