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What voltage converter should I get?

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Last response: in Other Consumer Electronics
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November 14, 2012 10:38:40 PM

Hi!

I brought a shaver with me to the States from Europe. I know I need some type of converter for it to work well and not blow up etc, but I have no idea about voltage, watts, hz and mah, so I don't know what to buy.

This is a picture of my cord:
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/690/photoqxo.jpg/

I'd be happy to understand what type of converter should I be looking for. For instance, I found this, I just don't know if this is what I need:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-50W-US-AC-Power-220V-To-110...

What am I looking for?

Thanks!

More about : voltage converter

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November 15, 2012 8:07:28 AM

No, not this one. You need one that say 110-120v 50/60Hz input and 220-240v 50/60Hz output.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Professional-220-240-To-110-...

^Make sure you flick the switch on the transformer to the correct input and output voltage when you plug it in. Also do not exceed 100w. So charging shaver is ok, but more power appliance will blow the fuse (e.g. a toaster).
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November 15, 2012 2:05:56 PM

Pyree said:
No, not this one. You need one that say 110-120v 50/60Hz input and 220-240v 50/60Hz output.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Professional-220-240-To-110-...

^Make sure you flick the switch on the transformer to the correct input and output voltage when you plug it in. Also do not exceed 100w. So charging shaver is ok, but more power appliance will blow the fuse (e.g. a toaster).


Hi, first of all thanks!
Just a quick question. You said I'm looking for an output of 220-240v. Shouldn't that be the input (from the shaver into the plug)? And also shouldn't the 110-220v be the output (into the American outlet)?
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November 15, 2012 2:41:27 PM

Your input is what the wall socket can supply and what your adapter takes in. Your output is what the adapter give out to supply your device.
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November 15, 2012 2:43:45 PM

Pyree said:
Your input is what the wall socket can supply and what your adapter takes in. Your output is what the adapter give out to supply your device.


Yeah sorry, I got a little mixed up there. Thanks a lot!!
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November 15, 2012 3:09:32 PM

Pyree said:
Your input is what the wall socket can supply and what your adapter takes in. Your output is what the adapter give out to supply your device.


Just one more thing to make sure - I need to know how many watts my device needs, so it won't be higher than what the transformer can handle. How do I know from the picture how many watts I need? I understood that Volts x Amps = Watts. So I do 230 x 0.28 (mA) = 65 watts?
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November 15, 2012 3:21:14 PM

You will be fine. The power adapter is only drawing 28mA (0.028A) of current.
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November 15, 2012 3:32:29 PM

Pyree said:
You will be fine. The power adapter is only drawing 28mA (0.028A) of current.


Great thanks!
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November 24, 2012 11:24:53 PM

Best answer selected by Crumbs.
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