Backup, RAID, Mirror confusion...

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

New machine (Dell) with 3 160gb "non raided" hard drives about to be
delivered.

Old machines system disk (Windows XPPro and apps) has about 15gb used. (C
drive)

Seems that on the new computer it would be a good idea if my system (boot)
disc (C drive partition?) had an exact copy made at the same time
(mirrored?) onto a (seperate partition?) on one of the other drives (say E
drive) so that if the C drive goes down I can press a magic switch and
everything is restored from E drive without having to reload Windows (XPPRO)
and all the apps.

Totally confused with RAID and Mirroring and things like Ghost and Drive
Image. Should I get back to Dell and ask for some sort of RAID - or other
advice gratefully received....

cheers
10 answers Last reply
More about backup raid mirror confusion
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Using RAID mirroring in the context you describe for a
    desktop is not really necessary.

    Three 160 Gigabyte drives, how do you intend to partition
    & use those drives ? The way you segment your drives and
    what data you place on each determines how to create a
    backup & recovery plan.

    Imaging is probably the best solution. Create an Image of the
    XP drive to a secondary physical drive. Then "Burn" the image
    to removable media for safety/storage.

    "Peter G" <peter@ducknospam.com> wrote in message
    news:unTDhWMoFHA.2904@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > New machine (Dell) with 3 160gb "non raided" hard drives about to be
    > delivered.
    >
    > Old machines system disk (Windows XPPro and apps) has about 15gb used. (C
    > drive)
    >
    > Seems that on the new computer it would be a good idea if my system (boot)
    > disc (C drive partition?) had an exact copy made at the same time
    > (mirrored?) onto a (seperate partition?) on one of the other drives (say E
    > drive) so that if the C drive goes down I can press a magic switch and
    > everything is restored from E drive without having to reload Windows
    > (XPPRO) and all the apps.
    >
    > Totally confused with RAID and Mirroring and things like Ghost and Drive
    > Image. Should I get back to Dell and ask for some sort of RAID - or other
    > advice gratefully received....
    >
    > cheers
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Peter G" <peter@ducknospam.com> wrote in
    news:unTDhWMoFHA.2904@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl:

    > New machine (Dell) with 3 160gb "non raided" hard drives about to be
    > delivered.
    >
    > Old machines system disk (Windows XPPro and apps) has about 15gb used.
    > (C drive)
    >
    > Seems that on the new computer it would be a good idea if my system
    > (boot) disc (C drive partition?) had an exact copy made at the same
    > time (mirrored?) onto a (seperate partition?) on one of the other
    > drives (say E drive) so that if the C drive goes down I can press a
    > magic switch and everything is restored from E drive without having to
    > reload Windows (XPPRO) and all the apps.
    >
    > Totally confused with RAID and Mirroring and things like Ghost and
    > Drive Image. Should I get back to Dell and ask for some sort of RAID -
    > or other advice gratefully received....
    >
    > cheers
    >
    >

    I've read the other repies, and see that you mainly do graphics and
    video.

    If the video work involves capture, meaning a high speed HD is required
    as this is disk intensive, RAID 0 is an option. RAID 0 stores the data
    across the drives, but with no redundancy. It offer's much faster thruput
    to and from the disk's, up to 80 or 85%.

    RAID 1 takes 2 HD's and make's them mirror's of each other. This is the
    'magic switch' you speak of. The caveat here is that two 160 Gig drive's
    appear as 1 single 160 Gig drive. Also, every disk write has to be made
    2, to each individual drive, therefore there is some loss of performance.

    It's been my intention's to do a certain procedure when I get a new
    machine or do a clean install of Windows (which hasn't been since '00, I
    upgraded this PC to XP from 98 then). So if I was getting a new DELL PC
    with 3 160 Gig HD's used mainly for video editing, I would do the
    following.....

    1) Receive the new PC
    2) Set it up to be sure it works
    3) Gather all the required driver's for the hardware and any programs I
    use.
    4) Format C: (it is a pre-loaded DELL afterall)
    5) Install a 'real' copy of XP on 'C'
    6) Set up D: & E: as NTFS RAID0, which will then become only D:
    7) Install ALL the applications I use, including some type of automatic
    backup to an external drive, 'smartly scheduled'.

    At this time, theoretically, the system is in a pristine state EXACTLY as
    YOU want it, with all of YOUR application's that you want/need.

    8) Do a backup of the system drive, with Ghost or something similar. If
    at any time a re-installation is necesary, you can restore from the newly
    created 'restore' disks. (The thing here is that we all install new s/w
    from time to time, so at some point you may need to create another
    'restore' set).

    I would then use the D: drive as the data drive only. Smartly backed up.

    You should also do a google search on RAID to see what the differences
    are between the different levels to see if that would be a good thing for
    you.

    Regards,

    Dans


    Recommended Uses: Non-critical data (or data that changes infrequently
    and is backed up regularly) requiring high speed, particularly write
    speed, and low cost of implementation. Audio and video streaming and
    editing; web servers; graphic design; high-end gaming or hobbyist
    systems; temporary or "scratch" disks on larger machines.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    I have a Dell that came with two 160s RAIDED together in a RAID 0 config.
    About 6 months after I got it, one HD crashed and I lost everything because
    the 'stripe process' of the Level 0. There are pros and cons associated with
    each RAID level: two 160s in a RAID0 makes ~ 320 gb which is cool until you
    lose everything. Two 160s RAIDED together in a RAID 1 will give you the
    mirroring capability which is good for data preservation in the event of a HD
    failure, but you don't get the large storage - two 160s in a RAID 1 only
    gives you 160gb but you'll still have all of your data if you lose a HD.

    There are other RAID levels available but you'll need a special adapter
    card. www.acnc.com has a fairly good RAID educational page.

    Personally, I'm going with a RAID 5 however I'm looking at a RAID 0+1 which
    requires 4 HDs but you get the beneifts of both: large capacity and security.

    Hope this helps.

    "Peter G" wrote:

    > New machine (Dell) with 3 160gb "non raided" hard drives about to be
    > delivered.
    >
    > Old machines system disk (Windows XPPro and apps) has about 15gb used. (C
    > drive)
    >
    > Seems that on the new computer it would be a good idea if my system (boot)
    > disc (C drive partition?) had an exact copy made at the same time
    > (mirrored?) onto a (seperate partition?) on one of the other drives (say E
    > drive) so that if the C drive goes down I can press a magic switch and
    > everything is restored from E drive without having to reload Windows (XPPRO)
    > and all the apps.
    >
    > Totally confused with RAID and Mirroring and things like Ghost and Drive
    > Image. Should I get back to Dell and ask for some sort of RAID - or other
    > advice gratefully received....
    >
    > cheers
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Thanks very much for that R McCathy -

    How would you partition this new machine and what what you use to create an
    Image?
    BTW The main use is for Graphics and Video. (Adobe Photoshop, Premiere Pro,
    After Effects etc.). I have a number of other external firewire drives and
    DVD writing hardware.

    I really appreciate your reply in helping me to devise a backup and recovery
    plan

    cheers


    "R. McCarty" <PcEngWork-NoSpam_@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    news:OB7UMjMoFHA.3984@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Using RAID mirroring in the context you describe for a
    > desktop is not really necessary.
    >
    > Three 160 Gigabyte drives, how do you intend to partition
    > & use those drives ? The way you segment your drives and
    > what data you place on each determines how to create a
    > backup & recovery plan.
    >
    > Imaging is probably the best solution. Create an Image of the
    > XP drive to a secondary physical drive. Then "Burn" the image
    > to removable media for safety/storage.
    >
    > "Peter G" <peter@ducknospam.com> wrote in message
    > news:unTDhWMoFHA.2904@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> New machine (Dell) with 3 160gb "non raided" hard drives about to be
    >> delivered.
    >>
    >> Old machines system disk (Windows XPPro and apps) has about 15gb used. (C
    >> drive)
    >>
    >> Seems that on the new computer it would be a good idea if my system
    >> (boot) disc (C drive partition?) had an exact copy made at the same time
    >> (mirrored?) onto a (seperate partition?) on one of the other drives (say
    >> E drive) so that if the C drive goes down I can press a magic switch and
    >> everything is restored from E drive without having to reload Windows
    >> (XPPRO) and all the apps.
    >>
    >> Totally confused with RAID and Mirroring and things like Ghost and Drive
    >> Image. Should I get back to Dell and ask for some sort of RAID - or other
    >> advice gratefully received....
    >>
    >> cheers
    >>
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    For Imaging I would probably use Acronis True Image, even though I
    personally use an older version of PowerQuest Drive Image. Symantec
    bought PowerQuest and replaced their "Ghost" line with Drive Image.
    Just being a "Stubborn-Old Guy", I won't be spending money to buy
    or use Symantec/Norton branded software.

    One criteria for the Physical drives is how they are connected - are
    they traditional PATA/IDE or SATA (Serial ATA). A big consideration
    is what simultaneous programs will be running. Third, Graphics &
    video work require huge amounts of Workspace (Temporary files).
    You would probably want the 3 drives configured something like this:

    Drive 0: Windows XP & primary applications
    Single 160 Gig is too large, but not sure how to allocate. I
    would personally use a much smaller, fast drive for XP, like
    a SATA-II 150 10,000 RPM 7.0 mS or faster drive
    You would want to try and keep this drive as lean as
    possible
    by moving things like DllCache/DriverCache/i386 to another
    physical drive (Drive 2)
    Drive 1: User data
    (a.) Partition for Mail, Docs, Favorites
    (b.) Partition for Video
    (c.) Partition for Graphics files
    Drive 2: Workspace, Pagefile, Temp folders, Backup Storage
    (a.) Partition for Pagefile, Temp folders
    (b.) System Maintenance (DllCache,i386....)
    (c.) Partition to store Images (for Recovery)

    This is just "Guesswork" on my part - but you want to segment things to
    maximize performance and keep data isolated. You want to make sure
    each physical drive is handling a different section of the code. (XP, App
    and Data files).

    If you're doing Video & Graphics work I hope you purchased a
    machine with 1.0+ Gigabytes of RAM.


    "Peter G" <peter@ducknospam.com> wrote in message
    news:uP52S$MoFHA.3448@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > Thanks very much for that R McCathy -
    >
    > How would you partition this new machine and what what you use to create
    > an Image?
    > BTW The main use is for Graphics and Video. (Adobe Photoshop, Premiere
    > Pro, After Effects etc.). I have a number of other external firewire
    > drives and DVD writing hardware.

    >
    > I really appreciate your reply in helping me to devise a backup and
    > recovery plan
    >
    > cheers
    >
    >
    > "R. McCarty" <PcEngWork-NoSpam_@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    > news:OB7UMjMoFHA.3984@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> Using RAID mirroring in the context you describe for a
    >> desktop is not really necessary.
    >>
    >> Three 160 Gigabyte drives, how do you intend to partition
    >> & use those drives ? The way you segment your drives and
    >> what data you place on each determines how to create a
    >> backup & recovery plan.
    >>
    >> Imaging is probably the best solution. Create an Image of the
    >> XP drive to a secondary physical drive. Then "Burn" the image
    >> to removable media for safety/storage.
    >>
    >> "Peter G" <peter@ducknospam.com> wrote in message
    >> news:unTDhWMoFHA.2904@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >>> New machine (Dell) with 3 160gb "non raided" hard drives about to be
    >>> delivered.
    >>>
    >>> Old machines system disk (Windows XPPro and apps) has about 15gb used.
    >>> (C drive)
    >>>
    >>> Seems that on the new computer it would be a good idea if my system
    >>> (boot) disc (C drive partition?) had an exact copy made at the same time
    >>> (mirrored?) onto a (seperate partition?) on one of the other drives (say
    >>> E drive) so that if the C drive goes down I can press a magic switch and
    >>> everything is restored from E drive without having to reload Windows
    >>> (XPPRO) and all the apps.
    >>>
    >>> Totally confused with RAID and Mirroring and things like Ghost and
    >>> Drive Image. Should I get back to Dell and ask for some sort of RAID -
    >>> or other advice gratefully received....
    >>>
    >>> cheers
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Thanks again - just a few clarifications if you have the time...

    > For Imaging I would probably use Acronis True Image, >

    yes research agrees!

    > One criteria for the Physical drives is how they are connected - are
    > they traditional PATA/IDE or SATA (Serial ATA).

    They are SATA so I think I'm OK. My needs are modest!

    > You would probably want the 3 drives configured something like this:
    >
    > Drive 0: Windows XP & primary applications
    > Single 160 Gig is too large, but not sure how to allocate.
    > I
    > would personally use a much smaller, fast drive for XP,
    > like
    > a SATA-II 150 10,000 RPM 7.0 mS or faster drive>

    I think I'm stuck for the minute with the 160gb - would it still be better
    to partition or leave as one big?

    > You would want to try and keep this drive as lean as
    > possible by moving things like DllCache/DriverCache/i386 to another
    > physical drive (Drive 2)

    If I have a partitioned system drive as above would these things be OK on
    seperate partition or probably makes no difference?

    > Drive 1: User data
    > (a.) Partition for Mail, Docs, Favorites
    > (b.) Partition for Video
    > (c.) Partition for Graphics files

    That makes sense...

    > Drive 2: Workspace, Pagefile, Temp folders, Backup Storage
    > (a.) Partition for Pagefile, Temp folders
    > (b.) System Maintenance (DllCache,i386....)>

    How do you do (a.) and (b.) - they always seem to end up on the system drive
    and work their way back if you try and move them...

    > (c.) Partition to store Images (for Recovery)>

    Just a little confused with semantics here - item (c.) is the mirror? of
    Drive C, created by Acronis? Does this stay synchronised automatically so
    that changes to system, apps and registry are written twice on, or do you
    need to set a maintenance routine?
    >
    > If you're doing Video & Graphics work I hope you purchased a
    > machine with 1.0+ Gigabytes of RAM.>

    yes! 2 gigs of fast RAM which is all, I'm told, that After Effects can
    handle at the moment.

    cheers
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    On partitioning Drive 0 (Windows XP), I would probably take up
    to 80 Gigabytes of that for C: and maybe leave the remainder as
    "Unallocated" space. You may have future needs that require a new
    partition. (Dual-Boot, Linux....)

    The "Lean" consideration, was in imaging the Windows partition.
    You would want it as small as possible to facilitate quick Image
    creation and recovery. If you make C: 80Gig+ then moving those
    to another partition on a secondary physical drive is not necessary.

    Redirection of the Pagefile and Temp variables (Folders) are done
    from System Properties, Advanced (TAB).

    The imaging philosophy isn't a "Mirror". An image is a compressed
    complete copy of the drive. If a recovery or restoration is needed,
    you simply boot to the CD and restore your C: partition from the
    image file stored on the secondary drive. Recovery from a Disk drive
    is significantly faster than from Optical media. But you still want to
    burn the image to CD/DVD-R(W) to have that extra layer of safety.

    The overall reason to segment data, is so you can better manage
    it. That includes different backup schedules and the like. The main
    thing is to always keep fairly recent images of Windows. Personal
    data should be burned in readable format and other backups can
    be done as you feel are required.
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Thanks for the alternative input Dans,

    I really appreciate the tip for doing a new XP installation to get rid of
    Dell excesses!

    Still some confusion on:
    > 7) Install ALL the applications I use, including some type of automatic
    > backup to an external drive, 'smartly scheduled'.>

    So - install all apps to Drive "C" then backup to external drive - is that
    belt and braces? Won't the Drive Image/Ghost do that?

    >6) Set up D: & E: as NTFS RAID0, which will then become only D:>

    I understand the concept but not the how! Do I phone Dell and tell them to
    include some sort of RAID cable or find something in XP that lets me do
    same? It seems that RAID5 is popular but feel very under tutored. Sorry for
    ignorance - spent the last 20 years hardly backing up anything - now
    getting nervous!

    cheers
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In all of this, based on the subject, it's important to remember that
    RAID, any type, is not a BACKUP method or solution, it's strictly a
    hardware redundancy method (except in the case of R0, and then it's
    double your chance for loss).


    --

    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Leythos <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in news:MPG.1d6a6a4a9c443e39989bc0@news-
    server.columbus.rr.com:

    > In all of this, based on the subject, it's important to remember that
    > RAID, any type, is not a BACKUP method or solution, it's strictly a
    > hardware redundancy method (except in the case of R0, and then it's
    > double your chance for loss).
    >
    >

    Understood. That is why in my explanation of how *I* would set it up, I
    specifically included a backup package and automated routine.
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