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Which printer works from the cheapest ink cartridges?

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Anonymous
March 7, 2010 4:20:27 PM

Can you recommend a printer that runs off cheaper ink cartridges. At the moment I have a canon IP1900 and it is the biggest rob on cartridges ever.

Kind Regards,
Bernadette Lynch
Anonymous
March 8, 2010 5:23:15 AM

I would suggest switching to a cheap laser printer -- mainly because the cartridges don't dry out if you don't use them.
March 8, 2010 1:13:39 PM

sorry for hijacking the thread but i feel my question is relevant to the thread.

Laser printers are cheap in terms of per page cost when compared to inkjet as a typical toner cartridge can take more prints per refill.They dont clog like inkjets.I would like to know about the cheapest monochrome laser printer which available in the market which can be refilled easily preferably from HP and how much a typical refill would cost.

Thanks
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March 12, 2010 9:01:03 AM


Hi there,
I work at Edelman on behalf of HP so hope you feel I’m qualified to get involved in the laser vs inkjet debate. In the majority of cases, lasers tend to deliver more prints for the costs and are faster than inkjets. Inkjets excel at producing lab-quality photos and the start-up costs are lower – they also tend to be smaller. It really just depends on your printing needs. Here’s an independent press article that provides advice on what to consider when buying a printer. With regard to the expense of ink – yes we understand that ink is perceived as very high cost. A lot of technology goes into the development of them and ink is fired from the cartridge up to 36,000 times a second to produce what we see on the page – no mean feat - but the good news is that HP did reduce its ink prices in the UK earlier this year and we hope this will be an ongoing trend (independent press articles on why ink’s expensive here). It might also help to get a printer with separate colour cartridges so that you only need to replace the cartridge that’s used up. Info here on keeping the costs down!
Best,
Charlotte
Anonymous
March 12, 2010 9:57:22 AM

The biggest problem, Charlotte, is that the ink jet printer makers (in common with mobile phone/digital camera manufacturers) have so utterly failed to cooperate to come up with universal consumables.

This increases costs (which are doubtless inflated anyway) and makes it difficult to locate consumables because it is such a nightmare for retailers.

One result is that it is often only a little dearer to buy a new printer or phone than to buy a cartridge set, or battery. Result vast waste and environmental damage.

Indeed there is a suggestion that inkjet printers are sold at a loss -- with profits made up on consumables.

My own feeling is that the EU or US governments need to give the makers a few years' notice to agree on universal standards and come up with 5 or 10 standard refills for all inkjet printers, laser printers -- and ditto phone and camera batteries.

Failure to comply would see these (mostly imported products) subject to penal import taxes.

Presently we see Panasonic (cameras) and several inkjet makers deliberately sabotaging the market for independently made consumables by chipping their consumables. This is clear contempt of antitrust legislation and will eventually lead to action by, at least, the EU.

Until things change, I and others will continue to recommend that people avoid buying inkjet printers.

March 12, 2010 11:07:41 AM

Hi there, yes you raise a valid point about universal consumables but I think it’s the same in most industries – automobile, white goods, tech products – all manufacturers develop their own parts / supplies that tend to be model-specific in many cases. I think printer users are offered more of a choice about what kind of cartridges they use and many choose refills. The issue here is there may be a reliability / quality sacrifice and HP’s approach is to off the best printing experience possible. I’ll also reiterate the point that HP has made a decrease in ink pricing this year and continues to monitor customer feedback.
Anonymous
March 12, 2010 4:15:37 PM

You are largely wrong on the motor industry. Parts is one issue -- though there are plenty of non-Ford parts available for Fords (for example) even body panels.

But consumable items such as filters, oil, hydraulic fluid, screen clean, coolant, brake discs and shoes, shock absorbers, exhausts, windscreen wipers, bulbs, tyres, (not to mention petrol and diesel) are pretty much generic for all but the most exclusive brands of car.

You need to pass back to your client that people are getting wise to the price of ink. Things need to change or the technology will disappear like dot matrix and daisywheel.
March 12, 2010 8:51:56 PM

I like Brother laserjets because replacement cartridges are so inexpensive (third party, that is, plus they last and last.)

But I, too, am looking for an inkjet to replace my Canon i860. The great thing about that printer is that generic cartridges are readily available for a few bucks each. Alas, their newer printers have followed the lead of other manufacturers and are expensive.

With all due respect to charlotteforHP, the cost of inkjet ink is one of the BIGGEST scams out there (it rates up there with outrageous charges for text messaging!) I have heard (apocryphally) that it is the most expensive liquid on earth! And the manufacturers have spent much $$ on preventing refills, under the guise of protecting the consumer, when it is all about protecting their profits. charlotteforHP - are you going to say that "development costs" justify a consumer having to shell out $50+ every time they need to replace CYMK on their printer? Gimmeabreak, NOBODY BELIEVES THIS!
March 15, 2010 11:20:32 AM

Yes – I hear where you’re coming from on the expense of ink. It doesn’t seem cheap when you’re standing there with a $50 bill however it is becoming more affordable - the cost of printing has come down 30% in the last three years. The average user will get through 3.8 ink cartridges each year which works out as a cost of $6 per month so it’s a lot cheaper than other home tech e.g. mobile phone, landline, TV subscription or broadband services.

Each new ink takes HP around 3-5 years to develop, testing up to 1,000 prototype formulas and HP spends $1bn (£650m) a year on inkjet research and development. There’s an article on Pocket-Lint that likens the process of printing to “dropping grapes into a bucket from the top of a 30 story building at speeds of 50km/h and at intervals of 30,000 times a second. We're asking those cartridges to make single dots on a page from 32 separate super-heated vapour explosions but yet be cool enough by the time they arrive to be dried and in good condition. And all of that through a nozzle just one third the breadth of a human hair. If the droplets are not the exact right shape, the lines on the documents on the photographs will become blurred and raggedy, the contrast poor and the images far from sharp” There’s also a good article on ComputerActive 5th Feb that also explains why ink is so expensive so you don’t just take my word for it!

March 15, 2010 12:06:02 PM

Every invention is complex enough to be written as a book.For eg take Internal Combustion engine there are thousand of parts in a single assembly and they should all work with proper sync to get the vehicle moving safely and not bursting into flames.So there is no need for exaggerating the work done by HP or any other company.Printing is not something new it has been there for ages and these technologies are not rocket science so allow it to be just another device and not a holy grail.... :o 
Anonymous
March 15, 2010 1:14:01 PM

Charlotte wrote:


"And all of that through a nozzle just one third the breadth of a human hair. If the droplets are not the exact right shape, the lines on the documents on the photographs will become blurred and raggedy, the contrast poor and the images far from sharp....."

Which is why I gave up on bubble jet with the expiry of my Canon monochrome, low resolution printer that had the benefit of ink tanks that were relatively cheap (and could be refilled if you didn't mind ink on your fingers).

Basically, ink jet worked fine before it was taken to impractical extremes. But higher resolution = smaller nozzles = blockages and dry-ups. When the cartridges that fail so easily are so expensive the technology becomes time consuming and ceases to be cost-effective.
Anonymous
September 11, 2010 6:55:34 AM

Will you people please start another thread? The OP asked a question and never got an answer. I am now searching and have had to read through all of your ramblings just to realize that none of you even attempted to answer the original question!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
September 18, 2010 11:57:06 AM

Hi. Well said anon.
I buy ink from internet-ink.co.uk exlnt++++ :love: 
September 18, 2010 12:41:33 PM

Quote:
Will you people please start another thread? The OP asked a question and never got an answer. I am now searching and have had to read through all of your ramblings just to realize that none of you even attempted to answer the original question!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


worse than bloody politicians aren't they. never a straight answer! :lol: 
September 19, 2010 11:00:43 AM

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