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OEM Windows

Last response: in Windows 7
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April 1, 2010 1:09:23 AM

Hello,

When I purchase OEM Windows 7... Is it required to load on a NEW Hard Drive or can it be loaded on a drive that had Vista or XP on the drive first. I would format first.

More about : oem windows

April 1, 2010 1:46:34 AM

It will work fine on any hard drive provided you format it first, but you can use W7 format utility if you want to; it does not matter.
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a c 215 $ Windows 7
April 1, 2010 2:22:09 AM

OEM copies can be installed on any drive you want. Just remember that once you install it on a PC, that copy is tied to that PC indefinitely, until you upgrade it to a newer version of Windows.
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April 11, 2010 3:23:55 AM

What do you mean "tied to that PC"?
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a c 215 $ Windows 7
April 11, 2010 7:55:29 AM

OEM licenses are non-transferable. Once you install it on a computer, you are not allowed to install it on any other computer. Microsoft defines a computer by the motherboard. You may reinstall an OEM copy of Windows on the same computer as many times as you need to, whether it be due to a hardware failure, or an upgrade like a new hard drive, or CPU, or video card. However, as soon as you upgrade the motherboard, you have to buy a new license.

Retail licenses on the other hand, are transferable between different computers.
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April 12, 2010 12:05:20 AM

For which the solution is to simply call them up and state a "motherboard" failure and that you had to buy a new one. They will let you reactivate the same copy of Windows. Sometimes they don't even prevent you from reactivating an OEM license. They probably only ban or question licenses that are trying to get activated on many different configurations in a small amount of time, so no worries if you need to upgrade after a few years.
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April 12, 2010 3:40:44 PM

also be aware when you by the OEM you are the customer support, so if you are having problems with it Microsoft will not help you.
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a c 215 $ Windows 7
April 12, 2010 11:02:32 PM

mkramer0820 said:
also be aware when you by the OEM you are the customer support, so if you are having problems with it Microsoft will not help you.


Actually they will help you, but you need to pay for support. that's where some of the extra cost of the retail license comes in.
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April 20, 2010 6:37:13 AM

Thank you... I have OEM Vista on my PC... What would you suggest to upgrade to Windows 7. I have several programs that need to run on XP I suspect.
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April 20, 2010 6:50:22 AM

In that case i would probably go for Windows 7 Pro x64. They feature a Windows XP mode which should help you out with any XP incompatibilities.
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a b $ Windows 7
April 20, 2010 4:13:48 PM

darkguset said:
In that case i would probably go for Windows 7 Pro x64. They feature a Windows XP mode which should help you out with any XP incompatibilities.


Unless it's a game. XP Mode does not do 3d Acceleration. However, you can use a program such as VirtualBox or VMWare Player. They both do 3d acceleration, but that doesn't mean the game will run well or at all. It's a crap shoot at times.

Now, when it comes to other programs, mostly business programs, then XP mode can work, but again, it's a crap shoot.

Worse comes to worse, dual boot. Keep the XP installation for the old programs and use Windows 7 for the new stuff. So far though, I've been lucky with the XP mode working with what I need it to. VMWare works great for games that won't run under Windows 7 64-bit.

However, be forewarned. If you use VMware, then you MUST have a licensed copy of XP or some other previous windows version whereas Microsoft provides you with a licensed copy of XP for use with XP Mode.



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April 21, 2010 12:00:42 AM

isamuelson said:
Unless it's a game. XP Mode does not do 3d Acceleration. However, you can use a program such as VirtualBox or VMWare Player. They both do 3d acceleration, but that doesn't mean the game will run well or at all. It's a crap shoot at times.

Now, when it comes to other programs, mostly business programs, then XP mode can work, but again, it's a crap shoot.

Worse comes to worse, dual boot. Keep the XP installation for the old programs and use Windows 7 for the new stuff. So far though, I've been lucky with the XP mode working with what I need it to. VMWare works great for games that won't run under Windows 7 64-bit.

However, be forewarned. If you use VMware, then you MUST have a licensed copy of XP or some other previous windows version whereas Microsoft provides you with a licensed copy of XP for use with XP Mode.


I avoided all that because the user is obviously not experienced, so mentioning a dual boot system to such a user is simply not ideal.
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