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wireless problem

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 17, 2005 1:20:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Have a SMC7004wFw router home network with one hardwire and two wireless
units -- were initially running off smc cards. Recently purchased a new
labtop that has its own internal wireless (intel 2200BG). Initially
successfully worked as unsecured hookup -- found connection and worked
well. Then internet ceased to work -- have packets received but not
sent. States that unit is connected and good signal, can hit repair
button and will reconnect -- but internet still not working. Properties
of wireless hookups shows microsoft client, intell wireless connection
agent, File and printer sharing, Q0S packet scheduler, AEGIS protocol
--IEEE 802.1x (v3.1.0.1), and TCP/IP.

If I use the hardwire hookup from new computer -- to same router, works
fine. What is happening? Thanks.

More about : wireless problem

August 17, 2005 1:52:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In news:ukYRz5yoFHA.568@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
Dan Conrad <dconrad@hsc.vcu.edu> had this to say:

My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

> Have a SMC7004wFw router home network with one hardwire and two
> wireless units -- were initially running off smc cards. Recently
> purchased a new labtop that has its own internal wireless (intel
> 2200BG). Initially successfully worked as unsecured hookup -- found
> connection and worked well. Then internet ceased to work -- have
> packets received but not sent. States that unit is connected and
> good signal, can hit repair button and will reconnect -- but internet
> still not working. Properties of wireless hookups shows microsoft
> client, intell wireless connection agent, File and printer sharing,
> Q0S packet scheduler, AEGIS protocol --IEEE 802.1x (v3.1.0.1), and
> TCP/IP.
> If I use the hardwire hookup from new computer -- to same router,
> works fine. What is happening? Thanks.

What IP address is it giving you? Is it assigning one in the 192.168.*.*
range? Is there a firewall blocking outbound packets?

Galen
--

"Chance has put in our way a most singular and whimsical problem, and
its solution is its own reward."

Sherlock Holmes
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 19, 2005 12:21:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Galen wrote:
> In news:ukYRz5yoFHA.568@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
> Dan Conrad <dconrad@hsc.vcu.edu> had this to say:
>
> My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:
>
>
>>Have a SMC7004wFw router home network with one hardwire and two
>>wireless units -- were initially running off smc cards. Recently
>>purchased a new labtop that has its own internal wireless (intel
>>2200BG). Initially successfully worked as unsecured hookup -- found
>>connection and worked well. Then internet ceased to work -- have
>>packets received but not sent. States that unit is connected and
>>good signal, can hit repair button and will reconnect -- but internet
>>still not working. Properties of wireless hookups shows microsoft
>>client, intell wireless connection agent, File and printer sharing,
>>Q0S packet scheduler, AEGIS protocol --IEEE 802.1x (v3.1.0.1), and
>>TCP/IP.
>>If I use the hardwire hookup from new computer -- to same router,
>>works fine. What is happening? Thanks.
>
>
> What IP address is it giving you? Is it assigning one in the 192.168.*.*
> range? Is there a firewall blocking outbound packets?
>
> Galen
Yes ip address is as you indicate -- how can I tell if a firewall is
blocking outbound packets?
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 19, 2005 2:05:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Dan Conrad" <dconrad@hsc.vcu.edu> wrote in message
news:uqCgmPFpFHA.3380@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>
> Yes ip address is as you indicate -- how can I tell if a firewall is
> blocking outbound packets?

I'm not well versed in networking at all, perhaps this is way off base.
I've had an ongoing problem with my home network since I switched from a B
to a G router. Two desktops that are connected via wireless adaptor would
lose the connection every day. At times, just reconnecting worked but at
other times, there was "limited" connectivity - the two desktops could see
the network but could not surf, receive email, etc. I found the problem to
be a defect in the router. The router supports 64 & 128 WEP and also WPA.
With no encryption or 64 bit WEP, the two desktops connected with no problem
and did not lose the connection. With any higher encryption, connectivity
would be lost at random times and there were times when re-establishing a
connection would not work.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 19, 2005 8:05:40 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

begin  trojan.vbs ... On Friday 19 August 2005 07:05 am, Peter A.
Stavrakoglou had this to say in microsoft.public.windowsxp.general:

> "Dan Conrad" <dconrad@hsc.vcu.edu> wrote in message
> news:uqCgmPFpFHA.3380@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>>
>> Yes ip address is as you indicate -- how can I tell if a firewall is
>> blocking outbound packets?
>
> I'm not well versed in networking at all, perhaps this is way off base.
> I've had an ongoing problem with my home network since I switched from a B
> to a G router. Two desktops that are connected via wireless adaptor would
> lose the connection every day. At times, just reconnecting worked but at
> other times, there was "limited" connectivity - the two desktops could see
> the network but could not surf, receive email, etc. I found the problem
> to
> be a defect in the router. The router supports 64 & 128 WEP and also WPA.
> With no encryption or 64 bit WEP, the two desktops connected with no
> problem
> and did not lose the connection. With any higher encryption, connectivity
> would be lost at random times and there were times when re-establishing a
> connection would not work.

Unless something more fundamental is amiss, it sounds to be like the lost
connections are due to signal loss. You need to be keeping an eye on your
signal strength. If the signal is interrupted at all when encryption
handshaking is taking place, the connection will fail. Wireless connections
are constantly going up and down in signal strength due to interference. If
your signal strength isn't strong to start with the addition of 128bit
encryption to your tcp packets can cause problems not seen if no encryption
is used.


--
Have you been MicroShafted today?
To mess up a Linux box, you need to work *at* it.
To mess up a Windows box, you need to work *on* it.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 19, 2005 8:05:41 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"NoStop" <nostop@stopspam.com> wrote in message
news:o rnNe.265579$s54.30163@pd7tw2no...
> begin trojan.vbs ... On Friday 19 August 2005 07:05 am, Peter A.
> Stavrakoglou had this to say in microsoft.public.windowsxp.general:
>
>> "Dan Conrad" <dconrad@hsc.vcu.edu> wrote in message
>> news:uqCgmPFpFHA.3380@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>>>
>>> Yes ip address is as you indicate -- how can I tell if a firewall is
>>> blocking outbound packets?
>>
>> I'm not well versed in networking at all, perhaps this is way off base.
>> I've had an ongoing problem with my home network since I switched from a
>> B
>> to a G router. Two desktops that are connected via wireless adaptor
>> would
>> lose the connection every day. At times, just reconnecting worked but at
>> other times, there was "limited" connectivity - the two desktops could
>> see
>> the network but could not surf, receive email, etc. I found the problem
>> to
>> be a defect in the router. The router supports 64 & 128 WEP and also
>> WPA.
>> With no encryption or 64 bit WEP, the two desktops connected with no
>> problem
>> and did not lose the connection. With any higher encryption,
>> connectivity
>> would be lost at random times and there were times when re-establishing a
>> connection would not work.
>
> Unless something more fundamental is amiss, it sounds to be like the lost
> connections are due to signal loss. You need to be keeping an eye on your
> signal strength. If the signal is interrupted at all when encryption
> handshaking is taking place, the connection will fail. Wireless
> connections
> are constantly going up and down in signal strength due to interference.
> If
> your signal strength isn't strong to start with the addition of 128bit
> encryption to your tcp packets can cause problems not seen if no
> encryption
> is used.

Perhaps that is the the problem with the router - not enough signal
strength. A new one is one the way. There is also a laptop that has never
lost the connection and is a further distance from the router than the two
desktops that lose connections. Also, I have a wireless bridge attached to
an X-Box on the bottom floor of the house (all PCs are on the top floor) and
that has never dropped a connection. It's strange, hopefully the
replacement router will solve the problem otherwise I'll stick with the 64
bit encryption if necessary.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 19, 2005 8:05:42 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I have seen high gain antenna kits for wireless routers...it might help if
it is indeed a signal strength problem.

--
A Professional Amatuer...If anyone knew it all, none of would be here!

> Perhaps that is the the problem with the router - not enough signal
> strength. A new one is one the way. There is also a laptop that has
> never lost the connection and is a further distance from the router than
> the two desktops that lose connections. Also, I have a wireless bridge
> attached to an X-Box on the bottom floor of the house (all PCs are on the
> top floor) and that has never dropped a connection. It's strange,
> hopefully the replacement router will solve the problem otherwise I'll
> stick with the 64 bit encryption if necessary.
!