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PC Won't Boot

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November 25, 2012 6:55:36 PM

Well basically my computer is really messed and wont boot. :cry: 
It comes up with various messages like "boot mgr image is corrupt computer will not boot" and "computed checksum does not match file checksum"and bluescreen. It has happened last time and it turned out to be infected RAM.
Here is my system specs.

Windows 7 Ultimate
AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core Processer 5000+
894MB DDR2 RAM (1 Stick)
Nvidia Geforce On Board Graphics Or Something.

Also it doesn't boot DVD's or CD's if it does it would be on the 100th boot.
Please Help :) 

More about : boot

a b α HP
November 26, 2012 1:18:20 AM

What model HP are we working with here
November 26, 2012 1:18:11 PM

C12Friedman said:
What model HP are we working with here


HP Pavillion Desktop there are various models im not sure which one but its black with a blue light button on top
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November 28, 2012 2:35:23 PM

BUMP Please Help :p 
a b α HP
November 28, 2012 5:14:16 PM

Here's the deal - HP has made well over 500 different models of pavillion desktop computers over the years so your information is not too helpful here. Take a look at the back of the computer, there should be a sticker there which will give model number and some other information - we really need the model number to help here.
You can try the steps shown in this thread http://www.sevenforums.com/hardware-devices/223750-boot...
that's the best I can do without the model number
November 29, 2012 2:37:38 PM

What happens when you try and boot into safe mode?

Also do you have a recovery partition installed?

Try and run a chkdsk -t -r if you can in the recovery partition.



November 30, 2012 11:44:24 AM

lewza said:
What happens when you try and boot into safe mode?

Also do you have a recovery partition installed?

Try and run a chkdsk -t -r if you can in the recovery partition.


I can't boot into anything it just freezes or restarts at the bios screen
November 30, 2012 11:55:04 AM

C12Friedman said:
Here's the deal - HP has made well over 500 different models of pavillion desktop computers over the years so your information is not too helpful here. Take a look at the back of the computer, there should be a sticker there which will give model number and some other information - we really need the model number to help here.
You can try the steps shown in this thread http://www.sevenforums.com/hardware-devices/223750-boot...
that's the best I can do without the model number


I'm sorry for being an idiot.
I just found the model :hp pavilion a6305
I was looking at the wrong side of the pc....... lol :) 
November 30, 2012 3:02:45 PM

And The proccesser is like 5 years old.


a b α HP
November 30, 2012 3:43:31 PM

No problem... but I'll have to get back to you when I return... a few hours
November 30, 2012 7:54:23 PM

C12Friedman said:
No problem... but I'll have to get back to you when I return... a few hours


Ok
a b α HP
November 30, 2012 9:18:33 PM

I think the first thing you may want to try is replacing the CMOS battery. It is the button battery on the motherboard. You can find one anywhere that sells hearing aid/watch batteries.
What I would do here. Open computer panel, locate your CMOS battery. NOTE which side is up (+ or -, usually, not always + is up). Take the battery out and take it to the store to ensure proper match (you could simply write down the battery type - often CR2032) and take that to the store. Replace the battery, start up the computer.
The computer should tell you system time needs to be set and to enter BIOS (it should say what button to press to do so) to set system time. Hopefully afterwards, your system boots.
There are a few other issues which may cause that but replacing the CMOS battery is an inexpensive, easy fix... If it works
Just out of curiosity, has it run at all since your operating system upgrade?
December 1, 2012 10:44:29 AM

C12Friedman said:
I think the first thing you may want to try is replacing the CMOS battery. It is the button battery on the motherboard. You can find one anywhere that sells hearing aid/watch batteries.
What I would do here. Open computer panel, locate your CMOS battery. NOTE which side is up (+ or -, usually, not always + is up). Take the battery out and take it to the store to ensure proper match (you could simply write down the battery type - often CR2032) and take that to the store. Replace the battery, start up the computer.
The computer should tell you system time needs to be set and to enter BIOS (it should say what button to press to do so) to set system time. Hopefully afterwards, your system boots.
There are a few other issues which may cause that but replacing the CMOS battery is an inexpensive, easy fix... If it works
Just out of curiosity, has it run at all since your operating system upgrade?


Well my local shop sells all sorts and i found the exact same battery and i replaced it. It's still not working.
a b α HP
December 1, 2012 11:27:36 AM

An interesting occurance which now has me believing your 'defective ram' issue of earlier times may actually have been a defective motherboard. Here's why I'm thinking along those lines (not a final conclusion yet as there are much easier/cheaper possible fixes), The amount of ram you show in the OP is not a normal number in any way - even if it was 896MB (a factor of 8), it would not make sense. Your system shipped (according to HP) with 2GB of ram so I would expect to see 2048MB there.
Next question for you, when the defective ram was replaced, was it done by you or HP (under warranty)?
One more thing to look at are the capacitors on the motherboard, check to see that they are not swollen or leaking at all.
December 1, 2012 11:30:22 AM

C12Friedman said:
An interesting occurance which now has me believing your 'defective ram' issue of earlier times may actually have been a defective motherboard. Here's why I'm thinking along those lines (not a final conclusion yet as there are much easier/cheaper possible fixes), The amount of ram you show in the OP is not a normal number in any way - even if it was 896MB (a factor of 8), it would not make sense. Your system shipped (according to HP) with 2GB of ram so I would expect to see 2048MB there.
Next question for you, when the defective ram was replaced, was it done by you or HP (under warranty)?
One more thing to look at are the capacitors on the motherboard, check to see that they are not swollen or leaking at all.


Yes it originally came with 2GB RAM but one was taken out because it was infected and i also upgraded to Windows 7 Ultimate, and i dont see anything wrong on the motherboard.
December 1, 2012 12:05:57 PM

BTW its wasn't done by HP.
a b α HP
December 1, 2012 12:58:09 PM

Your version of Win7 ultimate is 32 bit then? Checksum errors are sometimes associated with bad memory, the fact that you're showing a very strange memory count (rather than the 1024MB a 1GB stick should show) has me considering the following possibilities.
1) Since one of your ram sticks has already proven to be defective (not infected), it is very possible the other has also decided to quit on you (HP doesn't use the highest quality ram). Replacing the memory may work also. Unfortunately, DDR2 ram isn't all that cheap currently.
2) Power supply is going out of specs, this can have very dire consequences including 'burning up' components, causing irregularties in operation and many other nasties. You'll want to check the power supply for proper voltages even if you do find that changing the memory works as a repair.
3) Motherboard has hairline cracks in solder (comes from age, a few more months to a year or two may be gotten out of the motherboard with a reflow repair - a nasty, smelly repair without guarantee of success). We'll save that for a last resort.
I realize this is a lot to take in but you are welcome to ask questions
Hope it helps
December 1, 2012 2:09:48 PM

C12Friedman said:
Your version of Win7 ultimate is 32 bit then? Checksum errors are sometimes associated with bad memory, the fact that you're showing a very strange memory count (rather than the 1024MB a 1GB stick should show) has me considering the following possibilities.
1) Since one of your ram sticks has already proven to be defective (not infected), it is very possible the other has also decided to quit on you (HP doesn't use the highest quality ram). Replacing the memory may work also. Unfortunately, DDR2 ram isn't all that cheap currently.
2) Power supply is going out of specs, this can have very dire consequences including 'burning up' components, causing irregularties in operation and many other nasties. You'll want to check the power supply for proper voltages even if you do find that changing the memory works as a repair.
3) Motherboard has hairline cracks in solder (comes from age, a few more months to a year or two may be gotten out of the motherboard with a reflow repair - a nasty, smelly repair without guarantee of success). We'll save that for a last resort.
I realize this is a lot to take in but you are welcome to ask questions
Hope it helps


Thanks, i have just ordered 2GB ram its expected to arrive on Thursday.
Oh how do i select best answer and whats the difference between ddr2 and ddr3 and whys ddr2 so expensive?
a b α HP
December 1, 2012 2:42:11 PM

As far as I know, the main reasons DDR2 is commanding a premium comes from 1) still in demand and, 2) not being made anymore. Really a guess, not based on anything I've read.
The differences are summed up with this statement by Matthew Murray in PCMag.com
"...followed, in 2003, by DDR2, which refined the idea even further with an internal clock running at half the speed of the data bus; this meant it was about twice as fast as the original DDR (200-533MHz, with transfer rates up to 1,066MTps), but again used less power (1.8 volts). Naturally, DDR3 was next out of the gate (it debuted around 2007), with its internal clock cut in half again, its speed about twice that of DDR2 (400-1,066MHz, for a maximum transfer rate of 2,133MTps), and power usage reduced even more over its predecessor (to 1.5 volts).

(You may have already surmised the next logical step in memory technology. Indeed, DDR4 is already in development, and will probably begin appearing in consumer products around 2014, with wider adoption to follow gradually.It's expected to offer transfer rates of up to 4,266MTps, with voltage ranging from 1.05 to 1.2 volts.)

What's the down side to this constant improvement of memory? Unfortunately, you can't benefit from most of these advances without significantly upgrading—if not outright replacing—your current hardware: A DIMM that uses one kind of DDR interface will not work in a motherboard designed for another. Each type of memory is electrically incompatible with the others, starting with the number of pins on a chip (DDR desktop-style DIMMs have 184, and DDR2 and DDR3 each have 240), and DIMMs using each are keyed (or notched) differently so they can't even fit in the wrong kind of socket. It's therefore crucial that your existing hardware and the memory you want to add are of the same DDR type."
Found here http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2400801,00.asp

If this was started as a discussion thread there is no 'best answer', but you can always "thumbs up" an answer. Select as best answer is rather big and blue at the bottom of each of my replies.
!