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Need WinXP to support Intel HT?

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June 11, 2003 9:46:41 PM

Is it true that I'll need Windows XP to take advantage of Intel's Hyperthreading technology? I've been using Win2000 for years and would really hate to upgrade.

More about : winxp support intel

June 12, 2003 1:45:24 AM

No. I'm pretty sure 2K also supports dual procs so you should be fine.
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June 12, 2003 1:56:40 PM

Quote:
No. I'm pretty sure 2K also supports dual procs so you should be fine.

That's where you're wrong. Win 2K <i>does</i> support two processors. You're right there.

However, HT isn't two actual physical processors and thus requires different special treatment. WinXP was programmed to handle that. Win2K wasn't. So Win2K will see a noticable performance degrade if HT is enabled where as WinXP will see a noticable performance boost if HT is enabled.

Theoretically Win2K could support HT with a simple service pack upgrade. However, M$ wants people to buy new software as often as possible, and therefore isn't going to give people that service pack for Win2K. (Or at least not until long after just about everyone who would care has upgraded to WinXP.)

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
June 12, 2003 2:00:50 PM

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(BTW - the jump from Win2K to WinXP isn't that big. WinXP is basically the same core OS as Win2K, with new bells and whistles.)

In fact if you disable the Windows-For-Five-Year-Olds graphics (you know, rounded corners, bright primary and secondary colors, that stupid change they made to the Start button's functionality, etc.) you can barely tell the difference between Win2K and WinXP. At first I hated WinXP with a passion. Now with a lot of tweaking of the settings I can grudgingly accept its existence. Heh heh.

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
June 12, 2003 2:17:38 PM

I guess you REALLY hate OS X then :smile:
June 12, 2003 2:40:40 PM

Quote:
I guess you REALLY hate OS X then :smile:

Hmm ... how to put this nicely ...

Macs are generally only used by two types of people anyway:

Type 1 is the artistic style of person. Eye candy is their bread-and-butter. For them 'professional' looking software would be as stifling as a beige PC case. Heh heh. So let them have their fanciful OS. I'm fine with that so long as <i>I</i> don't have to use the OS myself. Whatever floats their boat so long as it doesn't affect me. And since I don't use Macs, that doesn't affect me. :) 

Type 2 is ... hell, no nice to say this one ... people so bloody stupid that they don't even understand what a file system is and how a PC actually works. People so inept with a PC that the just the concept of a three-button scroll-wheel mouse is intimidating enough to send them crying under their bedcovers. For people which are <i>that</i> dangerous around a computer, perhaps rounded corners on a window and bright colors is exactly what they need to ensure their safety. And since that most definately <i>isn't</i> me, they can have their fanciful OS. ;) 

Okay, seriously though, <i>some</i> eye candy is okay. Things like transparancy effects on menus are really handy. And transition effects are also pretty cool looking without demeaning my intelligence. This is the kind of stuff that I'd like to see more of in Windows. Artistic title bars and a well-drawn background graphic always have their place.

Rounded corners, oversized title bars, and bright primary and secondary colors however should be reserved for children 7 and under. (Or for people at that intelligence level.) You know, the kind of people that have to use rounded scissors and non-toxic glues because these things pose a safety hazard to them. Give <i>them</i> the rounded windows, not <i>me</i>. I <i>know</i> better not to run with scissors or eat my paste. I don't need someone to hold <i>my</i> hand. ;) 

So I see both WinXP and OS X as having their place in the universe. However when (and in the case of OS X ... <i>if</i>) I use them, expect me to fiddle with the settings until they <i>don't</i> lower my IQ by 40 points just for being in the same room with them.

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
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