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P4 3.06 temps

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June 12, 2003 2:12:52 PM

I´ve got the GNB-MAX motherboard and the P4 3.06. My cpu temp when I work in windows desktop is about 62Cº and after playing a 3d game is about 74Cº. Are these temps very high??

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June 12, 2003 2:15:59 PM

yes, very high
June 12, 2003 2:34:29 PM

So what can I do? My cpu fan speed is between 3924 and 4017 rpm. My system temp is about 47 Cº.
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June 12, 2003 2:44:39 PM

Do you even <i>have</i> any case fans on that system? What is the temperature of the room that the PC is in?

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
June 12, 2003 2:55:10 PM

There are four fans in my system: Power supply, cpu, chipset and graphics card (Hercules Radeon 9500 pro). My room temp is 20C now but when the temp is lower my cpu temp is the same. And I don´t have any problems with my computer(crashes or block ups).
June 12, 2003 3:10:21 PM

Quote:
There are four fans in my system: Power supply, cpu, chipset and graphics card (Hercules Radeon 9500 pro). My room temp is 20C now but when the temp is lower my cpu temp is the same. And I don´t have any problems with my computer(crashes or block ups).

Well no freaking wonder why your temperatures are so high! My goodness, you're practically running a thermal battery!

A heat sink works by moving the heat from the component to the surrounding air. If the surrounding air isn't itself moving then it's just going to get hotter and hotter until the heat sink and the air around it are the same extremely high temperature.

Fans on the CPU, the video card, and the northbridge do <i>not</i> move air through the case. They only move the air inside of the case around.

So what you are saying is that the <i>only</i> fan in your whole case that is moving air <i>through</i> the case itself is your power supply. Well, guess what, if the parts inside of your case can never get any fresh cool air, then of <i>course</i> they're going to run hot.

Put an exhaust fan on the case itself. Hell, put an intake and an exhaust fan on. If the case doesn't at least support an exhaust fan then either get one of those silly PCI exhaust fan inserts things or get a new case.

You have one of <i>the</i> hottest CPUs in there and if you don't move the air through your case efficiently, then all of that heat is just going to get stuck inside of the case, building up and up, and it will heat up <i>everything</i> in there badly.

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
June 12, 2003 3:32:46 PM

All right,thanks I´ll go to buy the fans and to ask for advice in the computer store. Only one more question. What is the normal temp for a P4 3.06?
June 12, 2003 3:43:39 PM

Hmm ... <i>normal</i> temp for a P4 3.06GHz varies a lot, depending on case airflow and room temp and all that, but under full load it really shouldn't be getting over 65C. Heck, I'd personally be miffed if my CPU was running over 60C under full load, but then I'm not running something as hot as a P4 3.06GHz. Heh heh.

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
June 12, 2003 6:25:22 PM

Full load temp for any P4 is less than 50C.
Average temp for any P4 is 35C idle, 45C loaded. Room temp 21C. As room temp rises cpu temp rises a linear amount.
ex. Room temp 23C cpu idle 37C cpu loaded 47C.

<font color=red><i>Doctor Hooter</i></font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.page3.com/" target="_new"><b>(·Y·)</b></A>
June 13, 2003 2:08:03 AM

You don't have to go over board with the Case fans. I Usually like to have an intake fan in the front and an exhaust fan in the back.

One tip though, get the quietest fans that you can, your ears will thank you trust me.

--------
The only thing that i truly know...

is that i know nothing at all.
June 13, 2003 5:07:58 AM

Wow! Talk about convenient! I was just wondering about the temperature of a 3.06Ghz system I've just built. It's idling at 52-53C and jumps to around 63-65C under load. I called Intel tech support and checked their site; they both said that it shouldn't be running any hotter than 69C. If I recall correctly, any processor worth its salt shouldn't fry flat out until around 85C. Regardless, once the processor hits 69C it is designed to throttle down to prevent slowly frying itself and shortening its life. That's Intel's new "Thermal Monitor" feature on their processors 2.8Ghz and greater - I'm pretty sure it starts some where around that speed, at least, and that sounds pretty great if it works as advertised.

Anyway, regardless of Intel tech support telling me there's really nothing to worry about with it running at 65C under load, that's still a little too hot in my opinion; however, I'm not sure what else I can do. I've reinstalled the fan/heatsink 3 times with fresh Arctic Silver 3 each time to try to get the temperature down below at least 50C, only I've had no luck. I've got 2 intake fans, one on the front and one on the side, one exhaust fan and the normal hardware fans(cpu, power supply, gpu), and my room temperature is a little over 70F(22C?) making the temperature in the case turn out to be around 28-31C. Does anybody have any suggestions as to how to lower the temperature short of buying an after-market cooler? Or am I wasting my time worrying about a few degrees and just listen to Intel tech support?

Here's my system:
Antec Performance Plus 660B with Truepower 330W
Asus P4SDX dual-channel motherboard(SiS 655 chipset)
Intel 3.06Ghz 533Mhz FSB cpu
2x512Mb DDR400 Corsair RAM
120Gb Maxtor DiamondMax ATA133 HDD
Plextor Plexwriter 48x24x48A
ATI Radeon 9700 Pro AGP8x GPU
Creative Audigy 2
Windows XP Professional

And here's the link for Intel's thermal support on Pentium 4 processors if you want to read:
<A HREF="http:// support.intel.com/support/processors/pentium4/thermal.htm " target="_new">http:// support.intel.com/support/processors/pentium4/thermal.htm </A>
June 13, 2003 6:10:16 AM

bassicly get a better cpu heatsink that's what i did, works great

ALWAYS AIM LOW SO YOU CAN'T BE DISSAPOINTED
June 13, 2003 6:53:20 AM

Hmmm... I went with a retail package partially because of Intel's fan/heatsink, but if the only option I have is to go with a more agressive cooler, I may do just that. I always heard good things about Intel heating solutions, though. :mad: 

Suggestions on cooling solutions would be welcomed.

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by RealWild1 on 06/13/03 03:01 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
June 13, 2003 7:13:39 AM

You don't really need to worry about killing your CPU because Intel chips have been coping with heat emergencies for years as Toms article on melting CPUs showed. Basically he removed the heatsink off intel chips whilst playing Quake 3 and none of them died (P3 and P4)

For better cooling I recommend the Thermalright SLK-900 and a good 92mm fan. You are right about the Intel solutions though - my mate has his P4 1.8 overclocked to 2.4 all the time with the stock heatsink / fan combo.

4.77MHz to 4.0GHz in 10 years. Imagine the space year 2020 :) 
June 13, 2003 3:56:24 PM

Another suggestion: it's been posted that you should have at least as many exhaust fans as intake fans, to have better airflow. In your case, the 2 intakes may be bringing in more air than the one exaust can sufficiently handle. This may not be a big deal, but thought I would suggest it.
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