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Do I need a new copy of win7 for new build using old parts?

Last response: in Windows 7
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April 2, 2010 5:49:57 PM

I'm planning on taking my motherboard and processor out of my current build and putting it into a new one. I'll be using my OS drive as well, but it won't be the OS drive on my new system. I'll have an SSD for that.


Do I need a new copy of Win 7 home premium 64 for my new system?


I used to transfer my XP install to different pcs, but I'm not sure about 7.


Thanks

More about : copy win7 build parts

a c 215 $ Windows 7
April 2, 2010 6:14:23 PM

In this case, no. Since the motherboard will remain the same, you do not have to buy another copy of 7.

If you purchased a retail version, as opposed to an OEM version, you wouldn't have to buy another copy anyway.
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April 2, 2010 6:17:47 PM

Awesome, thankyou.
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a b $ Windows 7
April 2, 2010 6:24:14 PM

Well if it's a retail version, then you can move it as many times as you want.

If an OEM version, it's a bit more complicated than "motherboard":

I haven't seen anything written on this since the days of xp, so until I hear otherwise will assume same applies:

http://www.helpwithwindows.com/WindowsXP/activation.htm...

If the PC is not dockable and a network adapter exists and is not changed, 6 or more of the other[ tabulated below] values would have to change before reactivation would be required. If a network adapter existed but is changed or never existed at all, 4 or more changes (including the changed network adapter if it previously existed) will require a reactivation.

The change of a single component multiple times (e.g. from display adapter A to display adapter B to display adapter C) is treated as a single change. The addition of components to a PC (adding a second hard drive) which did not exist during the original activation, would not trigger a reactivation. Reactivation would not be triggered by the modification of a component not listed above.

Reinstallation of Windows XP on the same or similar hardware and a subsequent reactivation can be accomplished an infinite number of times. Finally, the Microsoft activation clearinghouse system will automatically allow activation to occur over the Internet four times in one year on substantially different hardware. Every 120 days, the current configuration of a user's PC will become the new "base," so to speak. This means (for example) that on a non-dockable PC you could change 8 of the above parts without a reactivation. After 120 days, you could again change 8 parts. This last feature was implemented to allow even the most savvy power users to make changes to their systems and, if they must reactivate, do so over the Internet rather than necessitating a telephone call.

1. Display Adapter
2. SCSI Adapter
3. IDE Adapter
4. Network Adapter MAC Address
5. RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-64MB, 64-128MB, etc)
6. Processor Type
7. Processor Serial Number
8. Hard Drive Device
9. Hard Drive Volume Serial Number
10. CD-ROM / CD-RW / DVD-ROM
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a c 215 $ Windows 7
April 2, 2010 6:42:24 PM

Microsoft changed that somewhat to always require a new OEM copy if the motherboard changes. Since, in this case, it will not change, a new copy is not necessary. and as I said earlier, if the OP purchased a retail version, this becomes a moot point.
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April 2, 2010 7:18:06 PM

Yea it's not a retail copy, it's OEM. But like you said I'm keeping my motherboard so it's fine.

Thanks again.
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a b $ Windows 7
April 5, 2010 9:49:59 PM

The_Prophecy said:
Microsoft changed that somewhat to always require a new OEM copy if the motherboard changes. Since, in this case, it will not change, a new copy is not necessary. and as I said earlier, if the OP purchased a retail version, this becomes a moot point.


I have not found that to be the case in practice. Have changed MoBo and no problem (same brand, different model) and kept same MoBo and had a problem with the following changes.

1. Display Adapter
5. RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-64MB, 64-128MB, etc)
7. Processor Serial Number
8. Hard Drive Device
9. Hard Drive Volume Serial Number
10. CD-ROM / CD-RW / DVD-ROM

I solved this one by doing half the upgrade, then waiting 3 months and then doing the rest.
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a c 215 $ Windows 7
April 6, 2010 12:19:50 AM

Are you thinking of activation by chance? Changing hardware will occasionally require re-activation. It's a weighted scale, not sure exactly what the list looks like, other than the motherboard being at the top. Motherboard only applies though, if the same brand and model is used. re-activation is triggered by the presence of a different motherboard serial number. But I was talking about having to purchase a whole new copy if the motherboard is changed to a different model, even if it's from the same manufacturer, as Microsoft defines a PC by the motherboard, and OEM copies are tied to the first PC they are installed on.
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a b $ Windows 7
April 9, 2010 3:50:18 AM

Yes, the purpose of activation is to enforce the EULA .... however, MS's EULA and what they permit to take place .... and yes I mean knowingly .... are not always the same thing.
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