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Start up memory hogs

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August 21, 2005 9:46:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

I have been working at freeing up memory. What I found is that I have
numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing capacity. I
went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I don't want to run at
start up but according to the task manager they have still staked out their
little section of memory just incase. I want to delete them completely. Most
of what I saw in MSconfig was garbage. Where can I delete these? I've been
all through explore. There was one other place I seen a spec on actual
physical memory vs. available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive. But I
can't remember where.

More about : start memory hogs

Anonymous
a b } Memory
August 21, 2005 12:52:40 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Scott:

I use a free utility called 'Autoruns' to change startup items. You can
download it here:
http://www.sysinternals.com/utilities/autoruns.html (Scroll to bottom for
download link.)


--
--------------------------------------------------
Donny Broome
donny AT broomeman DOT com
Kill Spyware! Visit:
http://www.broomeman.com/spyware/
--------------------------------------------------


"scott" <scott@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:AC6978C2-8D29-4952-ADFA-50477EB3431E@microsoft.com...
>I have been working at freeing up memory. What I found is that I have
> numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing
> capacity. I
> went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I don't want to run
> at
> start up but according to the task manager they have still staked out
> their
> little section of memory just incase. I want to delete them completely.
> Most
> of what I saw in MSconfig was garbage. Where can I delete these? I've been
> all through explore. There was one other place I seen a spec on actual
> physical memory vs. available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive. But
> I
> can't remember where.
Anonymous
a b } Memory
August 21, 2005 1:13:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In many/most cases you turn off the autoload option in the preferences
section of the program that is loading itself. Many programs will not
function properly if you do that though. Just try it, reboot - and see what
happens.

If you are talking about spyware, please note that many of these pests will
reinstall themselves at bootup, even though you have previously unchecked
the autostart in msconfig.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"scott" <scott@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:AC6978C2-8D29-4952-ADFA-50477EB3431E@microsoft.com...
>I have been working at freeing up memory. What I found is that I have
> numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing
> capacity. I
> went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I don't want to run
> at
> start up but according to the task manager they have still staked out
> their
> little section of memory just incase. I want to delete them completely.
> Most
> of what I saw in MSconfig was garbage. Where can I delete these? I've been
> all through explore. There was one other place I seen a spec on actual
> physical memory vs. available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive. But
> I
> can't remember where.
Related resources
August 21, 2005 2:24:42 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"scott" <scott@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:AC6978C2-8D29-4952-ADFA-50477EB3431E@microsoft.com...
>I have been working at freeing up memory. What I found is that I have
> numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing
> capacity. I
> went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I don't want to
> run at
> start up but according to the task manager they have still staked out
> their
> little section of memory just incase. I want to delete them
> completely. Most
> of what I saw in MSconfig was garbage. Where can I delete these? I've
> been
> all through explore. There was one other place I seen a spec on actual
> physical memory vs. available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive.
> But I
> can't remember where.


Check the programs that are loading to see if they have an option not to
load. Check your Startup group. Check the Services (services.msc) to
see which ones you don't need running.

msconfig (System Configuration Utility) only lets you enable/disable
startup items. It is not an editor so it does not let you delete those
items. Also, if you want to delete them from the registry, you will
need to enable them in msconfig. This is because disables items by
moving them into a holding registry entry (it moves, it does not
delete). When you go to remove the entry, and if you used msconfig to
disable it, then you won't see it under the normal registry keys used to
startup items (because it got moved). So make sure to enable the item
in msconfig (to move it back) and then delete the item.

There are several ways to load startup items (and I'm not sure that I'll
get them all here):

- Registry run keys:
HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run[Once]
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run[Once]
- Startup group folder:
C:\Documents and Settings\<youraccount>\Start Menu\Programs\Startup
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup
- Logon scripts:
Run lusrmgr.msc, Users node, pick your account, and look at the
Profile section to determine if you have a logon script. I'm not a
domain admin but I suspect if you logon to a domain then it can push a
logon script. The one shown using lusrmgr.msc is for a local login, not
for a domain login.
- Scheduled Tasks:
Some can be scheduled to run "At System Startup" or "At Logon".
- Logon events:
There are some registry entries used to define events that occur on
login or startup but I'd have to go look them up again; they somewhere
under the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows
NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon registry key. Some malware inserts itself
there and unfortunately HijackThis and some other tools don't look
there. I remember one malware that inserted itself under the Notify
subkey here.

--
____________________________________________________________
For e-mail, remove "NIX" and add "#LAH" passcode to Subject.
____________________________________________________________
Anonymous
a b } Memory
August 21, 2005 2:41:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

scott wrote:

> I have been working at freeing up memory.

Wanting to minimize the amount of memory Windows uses is a counterproductive
desire. Windows is designed to use all, or nearly all, of your memory, all
the time, and that's good not bad. Free memory is wasted memory. You paid
for it all and shouldn't want to see any of it wasted.



Windows works hard to find a use for all the memory you have all the time.
For example if your apps don't need some of it, it will use that part for
caching, then give it back when your apps later need it. In this way Windows
keeps all your memory working for you all the time.


> What I found is that I have
> numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing
> capacity.


That may or may not be a problem. Many programs, unless they are actively
used, will almost immediately get paged out, and reside on a page file on
disk, rather than in RAM. That kind of memory usage doesn't hurt you at all.


> I went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I
> don't want to run at start up but according to the task manager they
> have still staked out their little section of memory just incase. I
> want to delete them completely. Most of what I saw in MSconfig was
> garbage. Where can I delete these?


The best way to stop a program from starting automatically is to check its
Options to see if it has the choice not to start. Many can easily and best
be stopped that way. Only if that doesn't work,should you run MSCONFIG from
the Start | Run line, and on the Startup tab, uncheck the programs you don't
want to start automatically.



> I've been all through explore.
> There was one other place I seen a spec on actual physical memory vs.
> available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive. But I can't
> remember where.


If I were you, I wouldn't do this just for the purpose of running the
minimum number of programs. Despite what many people tell you, you should be
concerned, not with how *many* of these programs you run, but *which*. Some
of them can hurt performance severely, but others have no effect on
performance.

Don't just stop programs from running willy-nilly. What you should do is
determine what each program is, what its value is to you, and what the cost
in performance is of its running all the time. You can get more information
about these with at http://castlecops.com/StartupList.html. If you can't
find it there, try google searches and ask about specifics here.

Once you have that information, you can make an intelligent informed
decision about what you want to keep and what you want to get rid of.


--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup
August 21, 2005 6:23:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

That's a lot to consider and will take time. I run auto cad and have upgraded
memory just to have the same problems with slow performance which is why I
was trying to free it up. Possible is should look at other options. The
previous respondents were helpful also and I have downloaded Autoruns but
have yet to figure out how best to use it.

"Ken Blake" wrote:

> scott wrote:
>
> > I have been working at freeing up memory.
>
> Wanting to minimize the amount of memory Windows uses is a counterproductive
> desire. Windows is designed to use all, or nearly all, of your memory, all
> the time, and that's good not bad. Free memory is wasted memory. You paid
> for it all and shouldn't want to see any of it wasted.
>
>
>
> Windows works hard to find a use for all the memory you have all the time.
> For example if your apps don't need some of it, it will use that part for
> caching, then give it back when your apps later need it. In this way Windows
> keeps all your memory working for you all the time.
>
>
> > What I found is that I have
> > numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing
> > capacity.
>
>
> That may or may not be a problem. Many programs, unless they are actively
> used, will almost immediately get paged out, and reside on a page file on
> disk, rather than in RAM. That kind of memory usage doesn't hurt you at all.
>
>
> > I went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I
> > don't want to run at start up but according to the task manager they
> > have still staked out their little section of memory just incase. I
> > want to delete them completely. Most of what I saw in MSconfig was
> > garbage. Where can I delete these?
>
>
> The best way to stop a program from starting automatically is to check its
> Options to see if it has the choice not to start. Many can easily and best
> be stopped that way. Only if that doesn't work,should you run MSCONFIG from
> the Start | Run line, and on the Startup tab, uncheck the programs you don't
> want to start automatically.
>
>
>
> > I've been all through explore.
> > There was one other place I seen a spec on actual physical memory vs.
> > available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive. But I can't
> > remember where.
>
>
> If I were you, I wouldn't do this just for the purpose of running the
> minimum number of programs. Despite what many people tell you, you should be
> concerned, not with how *many* of these programs you run, but *which*. Some
> of them can hurt performance severely, but others have no effect on
> performance.
>
> Don't just stop programs from running willy-nilly. What you should do is
> determine what each program is, what its value is to you, and what the cost
> in performance is of its running all the time. You can get more information
> about these with at http://castlecops.com/StartupList.html. If you can't
> find it there, try google searches and ask about specifics here.
>
> Once you have that information, you can make an intelligent informed
> decision about what you want to keep and what you want to get rid of.
>
>
> --
> Ken Blake
> Please Reply to the Newsgroup
>
>
>
August 22, 2005 2:24:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

how much memory u have in your machine. Remember Win XP recommends minimum
128 MB.

"scott" wrote:

> That's a lot to consider and will take time. I run auto cad and have upgraded
> memory just to have the same problems with slow performance which is why I
> was trying to free it up. Possible is should look at other options. The
> previous respondents were helpful also and I have downloaded Autoruns but
> have yet to figure out how best to use it.
>
> "Ken Blake" wrote:
>
> > scott wrote:
> >
> > > I have been working at freeing up memory.
> >
> > Wanting to minimize the amount of memory Windows uses is a counterproductive
> > desire. Windows is designed to use all, or nearly all, of your memory, all
> > the time, and that's good not bad. Free memory is wasted memory. You paid
> > for it all and shouldn't want to see any of it wasted.
> >
> >
> >
> > Windows works hard to find a use for all the memory you have all the time.
> > For example if your apps don't need some of it, it will use that part for
> > caching, then give it back when your apps later need it. In this way Windows
> > keeps all your memory working for you all the time.
> >
> >
> > > What I found is that I have
> > > numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing
> > > capacity.
> >
> >
> > That may or may not be a problem. Many programs, unless they are actively
> > used, will almost immediately get paged out, and reside on a page file on
> > disk, rather than in RAM. That kind of memory usage doesn't hurt you at all.
> >
> >
> > > I went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I
> > > don't want to run at start up but according to the task manager they
> > > have still staked out their little section of memory just incase. I
> > > want to delete them completely. Most of what I saw in MSconfig was
> > > garbage. Where can I delete these?
> >
> >
> > The best way to stop a program from starting automatically is to check its
> > Options to see if it has the choice not to start. Many can easily and best
> > be stopped that way. Only if that doesn't work,should you run MSCONFIG from
> > the Start | Run line, and on the Startup tab, uncheck the programs you don't
> > want to start automatically.
> >
> >
> >
> > > I've been all through explore.
> > > There was one other place I seen a spec on actual physical memory vs.
> > > available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive. But I can't
> > > remember where.
> >
> >
> > If I were you, I wouldn't do this just for the purpose of running the
> > minimum number of programs. Despite what many people tell you, you should be
> > concerned, not with how *many* of these programs you run, but *which*. Some
> > of them can hurt performance severely, but others have no effect on
> > performance.
> >
> > Don't just stop programs from running willy-nilly. What you should do is
> > determine what each program is, what its value is to you, and what the cost
> > in performance is of its running all the time. You can get more information
> > about these with at http://castlecops.com/StartupList.html. If you can't
> > find it there, try google searches and ask about specifics here.
> >
> > Once you have that information, you can make an intelligent informed
> > decision about what you want to keep and what you want to get rid of.
> >
> >
> > --
> > Ken Blake
> > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
> >
> >
> >
August 22, 2005 8:54:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

in the lap top I have two-128's and in the desk top I have a 256 and a 128. I
figured that since so many programs had residece in the memory that I could
get by with out getting more. I supose I sould just bite the bullet and get 1
gig four both.
Scott

"Andy" wrote:

> how much memory u have in your machine. Remember Win XP recommends minimum
> 128 MB.
>
> "scott"
>
> > That's a lot to consider and will take time. I run auto cad and have upgraded
> > memory just to have the same problems with slow performance which is why I
> > was trying to free it up. Possible is should look at other options. The
> > previous respondents were helpful also and I have downloaded Autoruns but
> > have yet to figure out how best to use it.
> >
> > "Ken Blake" wrote:
> >
> > > scott wrote:
> > >
> > > > I have been working at freeing up memory.
> > >
> > > Wanting to minimize the amount of memory Windows uses is a counterproductive
> > > desire. Windows is designed to use all, or nearly all, of your memory, all
> > > the time, and that's good not bad. Free memory is wasted memory. You paid
> > > for it all and shouldn't want to see any of it wasted.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Windows works hard to find a use for all the memory you have all the time.
> > > For example if your apps don't need some of it, it will use that part for
> > > caching, then give it back when your apps later need it. In this way Windows
> > > keeps all your memory working for you all the time.
> > >
> > >
> > > > What I found is that I have
> > > > numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing
> > > > capacity.
> > >
> > >
> > > That may or may not be a problem. Many programs, unless they are actively
> > > used, will almost immediately get paged out, and reside on a page file on
> > > disk, rather than in RAM. That kind of memory usage doesn't hurt you at all.
> > >
> > >
> > > > I went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I
> > > > don't want to run at start up but according to the task manager they
> > > > have still staked out their little section of memory just incase. I
> > > > want to delete them completely. Most of what I saw in MSconfig was
> > > > garbage. Where can I delete these?
> > >
> > >
> > > The best way to stop a program from starting automatically is to check its
> > > Options to see if it has the choice not to start. Many can easily and best
> > > be stopped that way. Only if that doesn't work,should you run MSCONFIG from
> > > the Start | Run line, and on the Startup tab, uncheck the programs you don't
> > > want to start automatically.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > > I've been all through explore.
> > > > There was one other place I seen a spec on actual physical memory vs.
> > > > available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive. But I can't
> > > > remember where.
> > >
> > >
> > > If I were you, I wouldn't do this just for the purpose of running the
> > > minimum number of programs. Despite what many people tell you, you should be
> > > concerned, not with how *many* of these programs you run, but *which*. Some
> > > of them can hurt performance severely, but others have no effect on
> > > performance.
> > >
> > > Don't just stop programs from running willy-nilly. What you should do is
> > > determine what each program is, what its value is to you, and what the cost
> > > in performance is of its running all the time. You can get more information
> > > about these with at http://castlecops.com/StartupList.html. If you can't
> > > find it there, try google searches and ask about specifics here.
> > >
> > > Once you have that information, you can make an intelligent informed
> > > decision about what you want to keep and what you want to get rid of.
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Ken Blake
> > > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
> > >
> > >
> > >
Anonymous
a b } Memory
August 22, 2005 11:25:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Andy wrote:

> how much memory u have in your machine. Remember Win XP recommends
> minimum 128 MB.


Regardless of what Microsoft recommends, 128MB is way to little for almost
anyone who does more with his system than play solitaire.

How much memory you need depends on what apps you run, but almost everyone
needs at least 256MB for decent performance. For some people, for example
those who edit large photographic images, more than 256MB--even much
more--can be required for good performance.


--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup



> "scott" wrote:
>
>> That's a lot to consider and will take time. I run auto cad and have
>> upgraded memory just to have the same problems with slow performance
>> which is why I was trying to free it up. Possible is should look at
>> other options. The previous respondents were helpful also and I have
>> downloaded Autoruns but have yet to figure out how best to use it.
>>
>> "Ken Blake" wrote:
>>
>>> scott wrote:
>>>
>>>> I have been working at freeing up memory.
>>>
>>> Wanting to minimize the amount of memory Windows uses is a
>>> counterproductive desire. Windows is designed to use all, or nearly
>>> all, of your memory, all the time, and that's good not bad. Free
>>> memory is wasted memory. You paid for it all and shouldn't want to
>>> see any of it wasted.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Windows works hard to find a use for all the memory you have all
>>> the time. For example if your apps don't need some of it, it will
>>> use that part for caching, then give it back when your apps later
>>> need it. In this way Windows keeps all your memory working for you
>>> all the time.
>>>
>>>
>>>> What I found is that I have
>>>> numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing
>>>> capacity.
>>>
>>>
>>> That may or may not be a problem. Many programs, unless they are
>>> actively used, will almost immediately get paged out, and reside on
>>> a page file on disk, rather than in RAM. That kind of memory usage
>>> doesn't hurt you at all.
>>>
>>>
>>>> I went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I
>>>> don't want to run at start up but according to the task manager
>>>> they have still staked out their little section of memory just
>>>> incase. I want to delete them completely. Most of what I saw in
>>>> MSconfig was garbage. Where can I delete these?
>>>
>>>
>>> The best way to stop a program from starting automatically is to
>>> check its Options to see if it has the choice not to start. Many
>>> can easily and best be stopped that way. Only if that doesn't
>>> work,should you run MSCONFIG from the Start | Run line, and on the
>>> Startup tab, uncheck the programs you don't want to start
>>> automatically.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> I've been all through explore.
>>>> There was one other place I seen a spec on actual physical memory
>>>> vs. available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive. But I can't
>>>> remember where.
>>>
>>>
>>> If I were you, I wouldn't do this just for the purpose of running
>>> the minimum number of programs. Despite what many people tell you,
>>> you should be concerned, not with how *many* of these programs you
>>> run, but *which*. Some of them can hurt performance severely, but
>>> others have no effect on performance.
>>>
>>> Don't just stop programs from running willy-nilly. What you should
>>> do is determine what each program is, what its value is to you, and
>>> what the cost in performance is of its running all the time. You
>>> can get more information about these with at
>>> http://castlecops.com/StartupList.html. If you can't find it there,
>>> try google searches and ask about specifics here.
>>>
>>> Once you have that information, you can make an intelligent informed
>>> decision about what you want to keep and what you want to get rid
>>> of.
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Ken Blake
>>> Please Reply to the Newsgroup
Anonymous
a b } Memory
August 22, 2005 11:28:39 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

scott wrote:

> in the lap top I have two-128's and in the desk top I have a 256 and
> a 128. I figured that since so many programs had residece in the
> memory that I could get by with out getting more.


Sorry, I don't understand that last sentence at all. Can you elaborate?


> I supose I sould
> just bite the bullet and get 1 gig four both.


You say you run Autocad. I don't know a lot about Autocad, but I *think*
it's a big memory user (someone please correct me if I'm wrong). If so, your
256 or 384MB may well be insufficient.

--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup



> "Andy" wrote:
>
>> how much memory u have in your machine. Remember Win XP recommends
>> minimum 128 MB.
>>
>> "scott"
>>
>>> That's a lot to consider and will take time. I run auto cad and
>>> have upgraded memory just to have the same problems with slow
>>> performance which is why I was trying to free it up. Possible is
>>> should look at other options. The previous respondents were helpful
>>> also and I have downloaded Autoruns but have yet to figure out how
>>> best to use it.
>>>
>>> "Ken Blake" wrote:
>>>
>>>> scott wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I have been working at freeing up memory.
>>>>
>>>> Wanting to minimize the amount of memory Windows uses is a
>>>> counterproductive desire. Windows is designed to use all, or
>>>> nearly all, of your memory, all the time, and that's good not bad.
>>>> Free memory is wasted memory. You paid for it all and shouldn't
>>>> want to see any of it wasted.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Windows works hard to find a use for all the memory you have all
>>>> the time. For example if your apps don't need some of it, it will
>>>> use that part for caching, then give it back when your apps later
>>>> need it. In this way Windows keeps all your memory working for you
>>>> all the time.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> What I found is that I have
>>>>> numerous programs setting up residence in the memory and reducing
>>>>> capacity.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> That may or may not be a problem. Many programs, unless they are
>>>> actively used, will almost immediately get paged out, and reside
>>>> on a page file on disk, rather than in RAM. That kind of memory
>>>> usage doesn't hurt you at all.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I went to MSconfig and de-selected most of the programs I
>>>>> don't want to run at start up but according to the task manager
>>>>> they have still staked out their little section of memory just
>>>>> incase. I want to delete them completely. Most of what I saw in
>>>>> MSconfig was garbage. Where can I delete these?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The best way to stop a program from starting automatically is to
>>>> check its Options to see if it has the choice not to start. Many
>>>> can easily and best be stopped that way. Only if that doesn't
>>>> work,should you run MSCONFIG from the Start | Run line, and on the
>>>> Startup tab, uncheck the programs you don't want to start
>>>> automatically.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I've been all through explore.
>>>>> There was one other place I seen a spec on actual physical memory
>>>>> vs. available memory, and the ratio wasn't impressive. But I can't
>>>>> remember where.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> If I were you, I wouldn't do this just for the purpose of running
>>>> the minimum number of programs. Despite what many people tell you,
>>>> you should be concerned, not with how *many* of these programs you
>>>> run, but *which*. Some of them can hurt performance severely, but
>>>> others have no effect on performance.
>>>>
>>>> Don't just stop programs from running willy-nilly. What you should
>>>> do is determine what each program is, what its value is to you,
>>>> and what the cost in performance is of its running all the time.
>>>> You can get more information about these with at
>>>> http://castlecops.com/StartupList.html. If you can't find it
>>>> there, try google searches and ask about specifics here.
>>>>
>>>> Once you have that information, you can make an intelligent
>>>> informed decision about what you want to keep and what you want to
>>>> get rid of.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Ken Blake
>>>> Please Reply to the Newsgroup
!