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Creative Computers?

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July 19, 2003 5:52:29 PM

<A HREF="http://www.discover.com/aug_03/gthere.html?article=feat..." target="_new">Read here</A>

<A HREF="http://www.naturalmotion.com/files/simplewalkevolution...." target="_new">Download video here</A>

Genetic algorithms that truly make computers "creative"!!!

This is a good read. I highly recommend you look at it.

Intelligence is not merely the wealth of knowledge but the sum of perception, wisdom, and knowledge.

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July 19, 2003 6:23:57 PM

interesting to say the least.

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July 19, 2003 6:55:02 PM

Well, this is, in contrast to neural networks, a relatively new technique... and I know it very well. I don't use it, but a few colleagues of mine at the physics institute work with GAs. They're very interesting, but they are very far from creating true AI. Generally, you use them to solve <i>one</i> specific problem. The results are usually very impressive; however, it is still the case that the computer only does a preprogrammed learning sequence.

Genetic algorithms are very simple, actually, but very inventive and useful. From a pool of possible solutions, you must evaluate the "fitness" of each solution to your particular problem with a preprogrammed fitness funtion - which is, of course, a vital part of the algorithm. Then, you select the fittest and recombine them into a new pool. You can then repeat the process until your pool looks as good as you'd like, in theory.

However, the two most important aspects are hand-coded: the fitness function and the recombination algorithm. In that sense, the computer will be capable of a lot of calculations and will basically optimize your pool of solutions; however, there is absolutely not a hint of creativity there. The only thing that was "creative" was the programmer's thinking... :smile: Nothing like a good programmer...

Anyway, in order to make computers really creative, they'd have to be able to write fitness functions and recombine possible solutions by themselves. Now <i>that</i> would require an ingenious programmer!... :eek: 

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
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July 19, 2003 7:09:08 PM

Quote:

Anyway, in order to make computers really creative, they'd have to be able to write fitness functions and recombine possible solutions by themselves. Now that would require an ingenious programmer!...

Well, you'd still need some kind of stimulus and information to process to initiate those actions.

Intelligence is not merely the wealth of knowledge but the sum of perception, wisdom, and knowledge.
July 19, 2003 7:13:56 PM

Can't genetic algorithms be used to improve OCR accuracy over time? I know they use neural nets in modern OCR software, but do they also use genetic algorithms? Also, the computer would need an end result (what the characters were supposed to be), would it not? I was trying to write my own rudimentary ocr algorithm a week or two ago, but I gave up after get a migraine from thinking too much, lol. Writing OCR software is extremely challenging.

Intelligence is not merely the wealth of knowledge but the sum of perception, wisdom, and knowledge.
July 19, 2003 7:19:39 PM

BTW, I was trying to work on OCR for my UFF (Universal file format) project. Read my latest thread on it <A HREF="http://forumz.tomshardware.com/modules.php?name=Forums&..." target="_new">here</A> I've basically done A LOT of research on compression, encryption, ECC, and OCR for my project from a programmer's point of view. This is definitely the most challenging project I've ever set for myself as a hobbyist programmer.

Intelligence is not merely the wealth of knowledge but the sum of perception, wisdom, and knowledge.
July 19, 2003 11:34:09 PM

In that same issue of Discover (to which I am a subscriber), there is an <A HREF="http://www.discover.com/aug_03/featfire.html" target="_new">article</A> on a new solar energy device. It uses an automatically adjusting array of small square mirrors to focus light from the sun on the "hot-pot" of a <A HREF="http://www.howstuffworks.com/stirling-engine.htm" target="_new">stirling engine</A>, which powers a generator. One of the problems the designers encountered when designing the device was coming up with a stirling engine that would be a good balance between cost and effectiveness, which vary widely in both ranges. For example the most efficient version known to date would cost nearly $50,000 to build, according to Discover. The designers of this solar device wanted to build one for about $100, as the goal was to produce a device that could realisticly pay for itself. They used a genetic algorithm to help design their stirling engine for them. The GA came up with a design that was half as efficient as the $50k Philips/GM design, but could be manufactured for roughly $100.

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Armadillo<font color=orange>[</font color=orange><font color=green>TcC</font color=green><font color=orange>]</font color=orange> at Lanwar and MML
July 20, 2003 12:39:37 AM

Quote:

The GA came up with a design that was half as efficient as the $50k Philips/GM design, but could be manufactured for roughly $100.

Now that's absolutely amazing!!! :eek: 

Intelligence is not merely the wealth of knowledge but the sum of perception, wisdom, and knowledge.
July 20, 2003 12:45:29 AM

New pool. Did a big hole in the ground. Fill it up with water. Total cost $10 for the shovel. Plus one broken back when your done.
July 20, 2003 1:30:29 AM

Quote:

New pool. Did a big hole in the ground. Fill it up with water. Total cost $10 for the shovel. Plus one broken back when your done.

Other pool. :wink:

Intelligence is not merely the wealth of knowledge but the sum of perception, wisdom, and knowledge.
July 20, 2003 3:15:45 AM

Other Pool? You talking office pool?
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