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How to transfer all the software loaded to other disk?

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  • Microsoft
  • Software
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
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Anonymous
August 22, 2005 9:54:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

When a software loaded either from a CD or other sources is generally stored
on C: disk where the system is located, now, I want to have all the
softwares to be loaded stored on other disk , say D: disk. How could I
configure?

More about : transfer software loaded disk

Anonymous
August 22, 2005 10:07:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

All,as in copy disk to disk.That can be done by 1st formating the new
drive,have
this drive to recieve on same IDE cable as C:,after the format,go to
run,type:
XCOPY C:\*.* D:\ /c/h/e/k/r Agree to all in the DOS window,also,D: being
the slave drive,however if xp gives it diffrent letter,then use that
instead.Once
the DOS window closes,youre thru with a bootable hd.

"Manyanel" wrote:

> When a software loaded either from a CD or other sources is generally stored
> on C: disk where the system is located, now, I want to have all the
> softwares to be loaded stored on other disk , say D: disk. How could I
> configure?
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 11:42:41 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Manyanel wrote:

> When a software loaded either from a CD or other sources is generally stored
> on C: disk where the system is located, now, I want to have all the
> softwares to be loaded stored on other disk , say D: disk. How could I
> configure?

You need to uninstall everything that you want to move and reinstall it
on the drive you want it to be on.

Ain't no other way to do it.
Related resources
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 1:08:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

sounds like u have two Operating Systems runnig and you want to run same
programs from both partions. Am i right, if yes then just simply copy the
shortcuts and paste it to the new partions and it should work. You don't need
to loaded stored on other disk.
If u are asking to move all the progrmas from one OS to OS it's not
possible. You will face big time running all the programs and your system
will mess up.

"Manyanel" wrote:

> When a software loaded either from a CD or other sources is generally stored
> on C: disk where the system is located, now, I want to have all the
> softwares to be loaded stored on other disk , say D: disk. How could I
> configure?
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 1:33:29 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Uninstall from C: - reinstall to D:

Software can not just be moved. It usually will not function.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"Manyanel" <Manyanel@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:AD4C3540-3EA0-4C70-829D-F89662B1A0D8@microsoft.com...
> When a software loaded either from a CD or other sources is generally
> stored
> on C: disk where the system is located, now, I want to have all the
> softwares to be loaded stored on other disk , say D: disk. How could I
> configure?
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 1:35:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Xcopy will blowup when it tries to copy the first open and in use file.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"Andrew E." <eckrichco@msn.com> wrote in message
news:462CC61A-0AFB-44F3-92A7-E6D6DB3E18C7@microsoft.com...
> All,as in copy disk to disk.That can be done by 1st formating the new
> drive,have
> this drive to recieve on same IDE cable as C:,after the format,go to
> run,type:
> XCOPY C:\*.* D:\ /c/h/e/k/r Agree to all in the DOS window,also,D: being
> the slave drive,however if xp gives it diffrent letter,then use that
> instead.Once
> the DOS window closes,youre thru with a bootable hd.
>
> "Manyanel" wrote:
>
>> When a software loaded either from a CD or other sources is generally
>> stored
>> on C: disk where the system is located, now, I want to have all the
>> softwares to be loaded stored on other disk , say D: disk. How could I
>> configure?
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 2:17:28 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

That's a good point.... Xcopy will likely stumble on an open file.
And there will be many to stumble over.
Andrew's xcopy suggestion is fine for copying or backing-up personal files
to a separate drive, but not moving applications.

Richard in Va.
+++++++++++++++++
"Richard Urban [MVP]" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:exon3L4pFHA.2620@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Xcopy will blowup when it tries to copy the first open and in use file.
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Richard Urban
> Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User
>
> Quote from: George Ankner
> "If you knew as much as you thought you know,
> You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"
>
> "Andrew E." <eckrichco@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:462CC61A-0AFB-44F3-92A7-E6D6DB3E18C7@microsoft.com...
>> All,as in copy disk to disk.That can be done by 1st formating the new
>> drive,have
>> this drive to recieve on same IDE cable as C:,after the format,go to
>> run,type:
>> XCOPY C:\*.* D:\ /c/h/e/k/r Agree to all in the DOS window,also,D: being
>> the slave drive,however if xp gives it diffrent letter,then use that
>> instead.Once
>> the DOS window closes,youre thru with a bootable hd.
>>
>> "Manyanel" wrote:
>>
>>> When a software loaded either from a CD or other sources is generally
>>> stored
>>> on C: disk where the system is located, now, I want to have all the
>>> softwares to be loaded stored on other disk , say D: disk. How could I
>>> configure?
>
>
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 2:18:33 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In addition to what Andrew has said...
(Please read all that I've added)

If you try this and you see a black window that disappears rather quickly
and nothing appears to have happened.
It's likely that you don't have enough system ram to execute the task.
To check this, open a DOS window (Start>(All) Programs>Accessories and
select the "command prompt" icon).
Then type in Andrew's DOS command as he shows.
The "black" window will remain open such that you can read any error
messages. Close the window when thru.
If the command runs as Andrew suggest, the window will remain open during
the copy routine and you should see files being copied.
The DOS window will self close when thru so you won't see the last few
lines. missing any final error messages.
Note that Andrew is using the /c switch, which tells the routine to continue
copying even if errors occur.
You may or may not want this... your decision....
This is a DOS (pre-dating windows) command.
If you'd like to read more on this 'xcopy" command, open a DOS command
window as above and type in "help xcopy".
Here you can review all the associated command switches.

This will copy "ALL" files from C:\ to D:\ . Not just your program files.
This will not "Move" or "Relocate" your applications to drive D:\.
You will have "all" files, including hidden system files and folders located
on both drives and may cause big problems.

If you simply want to, from here-on-out, install (new) applications on drive
D:\. Choose a "custom install" option during application installation.
And change the C:\ to D:\ without disturbing the rest of the target
installation folder.This will maintain the "Programs Files" folder
structure.
The only real way to move an application is to un-install and re-install
using the new target drive.
However there are program utilities that are supposed to do this for you as
a "Program Transport" thing. (Never used one)

Now with Windows 98, there are two keys in the registry that could be
changed from C:\ to D:\ and Windows would handle it for you on new
installations only.
I don't believe it's that simple with XP. But I don't know for certain. I've
been using XP for some time now and I just make the change manually during
install.
And even after all this. Many applications will still install some of itself
on drive C.

Hope I've done more help than harm!
What I say is based solely on my personal computing experiences and I'm no
authority. So please, use only what' useful to you and discard the rest as
personal opinion.

Good luck!
Richard in Va.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++


"Andrew E." <eckrichco@msn.com> wrote in message
news:462CC61A-0AFB-44F3-92A7-E6D6DB3E18C7@microsoft.com...
> All,as in copy disk to disk.That can be done by 1st formating the new
> drive,have
> this drive to recieve on same IDE cable as C:,after the format,go to
> run,type:
> XCOPY C:\*.* D:\ /c/h/e/k/r Agree to all in the DOS window,also,D: being
> the slave drive,however if xp gives it diffrent letter,then use that
> instead.Once
> the DOS window closes,youre thru with a bootable hd.
>
> "Manyanel" wrote:
>
>> When a software loaded either from a CD or other sources is generally
>> stored
>> on C: disk where the system is located, now, I want to have all the
>> softwares to be loaded stored on other disk , say D: disk. How could I
>> configure?
!