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July 23, 2003 5:20:08 AM

i am about to purchase a complete system from www.cyberpowerpc.com

case: aliminum turbo gamer SX 1040 server case 425W
CPU: (800 FSB)Intel P4 3.2
MOBO: ABIT IC7 I875PE 800Mhz FSB DUAL DDR 8X AGP
sony 16X dvd-rom
sony cdrw 52X24X52 EIDE
FAN: INTEL certified cpu fan & heatsink
mitsumi 1.44MB floppy
80GB 7200 RPM ATA 100Hard Drive
windows Xp pro
soound: creative labs SB audigy-2 platinum 6.1
speakers: Klipsch Promedia THX 5.1 subwoofer system
video: ATI RADEON 9800 PRO 128MB

probably will go with a viewsonic 19" P90F monitor

see anything missing or that would need to be changed. used mostly for gaming, but want high-end gaming.

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by ssmith on 07/23/03 01:23 AM.</EM></FONT></P>

More about : gathering info

July 23, 2003 5:33:54 AM

I might be blind but i don't see any memory...it is kinda late though...other than that...not bad...cept you know what brand power supply comes with your case...a bad PS could cause a lot of headaches

There is no smell better than fried silicon :evil: 
July 23, 2003 5:41:20 AM

oops.

memory: 1024 MB PC3200 400Mhz

power supply: has listed as standard case power supply, with a $79 add for black thermaltake 480 Watt silent power supply

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by ssmith on 07/23/03 00:43 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
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July 23, 2003 5:42:52 AM

what brand (memory)...all sounds pretty good...gonna be pretty damn fast...

There is no smell better than fried silicon :evil: 
July 23, 2003 5:45:17 AM

it states that they use: kingston, samsung, micron or nanya

will the standard case power supply be sufficient?

in your opinion, where should the pc fall at price wise?

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by ssmith on 07/23/03 00:47 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
July 23, 2003 6:53:45 AM

corsair xms memory is a good choice.

The Ultimate Video Processor:
GeForceFX + Radeon + Parhelia = "Radeohelia FX"
July 23, 2003 7:02:41 AM

You do not nead a 480 watter for this system...i would say that 370-400 is what this requires...if they don't tell you the PS name then treat it as generic...i would be hard pressed to build a system like this and scimp on the power supply...

Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 23, 2003 3:13:13 PM

Have you checked prices with New Egg? Who makes HD? IMO I would go with 2000 PRO. Uses less resources plus you don't need all that eye candy. Are you buying HSF? Retail CPU from Intel comes with stock HSF.
July 23, 2003 3:14:28 PM

CD rewrite go with Liteon 52x24x52. I bought same Floppy.
July 23, 2003 3:21:59 PM

Do you plan on overclocking?
July 23, 2003 3:33:02 PM

Quote:
IMO I would go with 2000 PRO.

Last I knew Win2K didn't support HyperThreading correctly.

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
July 23, 2003 3:46:56 PM

You might want to read what other buyers have to say about Cyberpower at - <A HREF="http://resellerratings.com./seller2120.html" target="_new">resellerratings.com</A>.

Especially their tech support ...



<b><font color=red>It depends on what the meaning of the word "is" is. - Bill Clinton<b><font color=red>
July 23, 2003 4:02:37 PM

I'll get back to you on that. I'll email a friend who has P4 3.06 he's been using HT. I beleave he has 2000 PRO.
July 23, 2003 6:05:33 PM

i wondeer if service pack 4 corrected any of that...

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 23, 2003 6:25:16 PM

Quote:
You might want to read what other buyers have to say about Cyberpower at - resellerratings.com.

Especially their tech support ...

Ouch! I haven't seen that many customer reviews <i>that</i> bad in a long time. It's a hillarious read until you realize that these are real people being screwed by an obviously shady reseller.

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
July 23, 2003 6:58:11 PM

is new egg a good place to buy a complete system?

no, i do not plan on overclocking.<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by ssmith on 07/23/03 01:59 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
July 23, 2003 7:02:43 PM

Well I may be wrong. **shrug**

I just know that months ago I read an article on how WinNT and Win2K technically views HT processors as two seperate physical processors. Where as Win XP (and Win Server 2003) view HT processors as an actual single processor that is just capable of scheduling tasks better. There's extra code involved in these OSes to keep the scheduling from actually treating an HT processor as just two physical processors. And in the case of two actual physical HT-enabled processors WinXP schedules tasks in the order of physical-physical-logical-logical instead of Win2K and WinNT which schedule tasks in the order of physical-logical-physical-logical, often resulting in one HT-enabled CPU being maxed out while the other doesn't even get utilized.

The article basically said that because of better OS support WinXP runs HT processors noticably better and in fact in many cases WinNT and Win2K you're better off just disabling HT all together.

That's what the article said anyway. **shrug** Not having had a HT processor and several OSes to try it out on, I pretty much just had to assume that they were right.

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
July 23, 2003 7:10:23 PM

I've never heard (may just be me) of Newegg selling finished, built systems - but as far as "parts" go - they are 1st rate. Check out Pricegrabber.com, find any part - say a CPU - search - will show Newegg and others - then check their reviews (not the part - the seller).

I think you'll find that most of the people here kind of default to Newegg 1st. You'll find others though.



<b><font color=red>It depends on what the meaning of the word "is" is. - Bill Clinton<b><font color=red>
July 23, 2003 7:40:22 PM

well, i do not have the knowledge of building my own pc, so i need to buy a complete system. any recommendations as where to look?
July 23, 2003 7:47:50 PM

Look at <A HREF="http://www.abspc.com/index.asp" target="_new">ABS</A> and <A HREF="http://www.falcon-nw.com/index.asp" target="_new">Falcon Northwest</A>.
Both may be higher than that other company, both only offer a limited range of pre-built systems w/limited configuration options, and I'd check their reviews too.

I have not done business with either - just have read decent reviews.
BTW, I don't know if the original company is that bad - I was just pointing you to some user reviews/ratings.



<b><font color=red>It depends on what the meaning of the word "is" is. - Bill Clinton<b><font color=red>
July 24, 2003 12:05:50 AM

I don't know if the have complete system. I've bought from them seperate hardware for my puter upgrade.
July 24, 2003 1:09:03 AM

is it better to get 2 sticks of 512 of ram or to get

Corsair XMS TwinX 512 MB PC3700 DDR467, Heat Spreaders, Matched Pair
July 24, 2003 1:33:25 AM

look at the timmings on that memory...then reconsider your recomendation

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 24, 2003 1:54:40 AM

Case: CoolerMaster ATC-210 w/Antec 430w & Front USB (Foggy Blue Front)
Intel CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.2 GHz (512k Cache, 800 MHz FSB)
Motherboard: Intel D875PBZ with GB-LAN/S.ATA/8xAGP (800MHz FSB)
Case Fan: Clear 80mm Case Fan, Blue LED
RAM (1st stick): Corsair 512 MB PC3200 DDR400, Value Select
RAM (2nd stick): Corsair 512 MB PC3200 DDR400, Value Select
Hard Drive 1: Seagate 80 GB, Ultra 100, 7200 RPM
CD-RW / DVD-RW: LiteOn CDRW, 52x24x52 - Beige
DVD Drive Only: LiteOn LTD163 IDE DVD, 16x48x, Software Included - Beige
Floppy: Mitsumi 1.44 MB Floppy Drive - Beige
Video Card: ATI RADEON 9800 Pro 128MB (Dual Head, DVI, OEM)
Monitor: Viewsonic 19" P90f
Sound Card: SoundBlaster Audigy 2 Platinum with External Audigy Drive
Speakers: Klipsch Promedia THX 5.1 Subwoofer speaker system
Keyboard: Eluminx Silver Sapphire Keyboard PS/2
Mouse: Logitech MX500 Optical Mouse
Operating System: Windows XP Home (OEM)
Other Software: Microsoft Works Suite 2003 (OEM)
Network Card: PCI 10 / 100 Network Card (DLink DFE530TX+)

opinions?
July 24, 2003 2:09:12 AM

an intel mobo? I would recomend a 3rd party manufacturer...

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 24, 2003 2:49:01 AM

Mobo Abit IS7 or Asus P4P800. OS buy XP PRO. or 2000 PRO.
July 24, 2003 2:51:05 AM

Are you building this? Or is someone else building it for you?
July 24, 2003 2:53:11 AM

someone else...
July 24, 2003 2:57:30 AM

Are you going to a computer store to have this built? Or someone you know?
July 24, 2003 3:30:06 AM

envision computer solutions... still have not decided what to do... too many things to choose from... lol

but appreciate all the good advice...
July 24, 2003 3:35:11 AM

kansas. i had my mind made up on cyberpower, but read some of the reviews. although some of the reviews were good, some were pretty scary sounding...
July 24, 2003 3:35:29 AM

if you cannot build it...i recomend buying all the parts and going to a local mom and pop store...they build computers just as well if not better than a big manufacturer...plus if you need service they are nearby

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 24, 2003 3:36:58 AM

You can send Private Msg to Crashman he builds Computers.
July 24, 2003 3:43:16 AM

are you sure that you arn't up to it...don't wana push you to do anything ya don't want here

But...the motheboard comes with a manual for a reason...all you have to do is insall the cpu on the mobo then heatsink...put the mobo in the case...hook up the power connector...install your drives...and connect them to ide controllor...then connect the cd sound cable to the sound card...and that pretty much it...

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 24, 2003 4:13:23 AM

where can i find a list of all the necessary equipment if i do decide to build this thing?

and maybe the best choices for each item.

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by ssmith on 07/23/03 11:15 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
July 24, 2003 4:32:58 AM

on top of what you have...drive cables...if they don't come with them already....and it would also be a good idea to get some thermal greese...you also may want some zip ties to tiddy up the case....off the top of my head i can't think of much else...all the screws and stuff come with the case...also you need an opperating system...if you need ANY help building this...post PM me...or IM me...

Remember to get the retail version of that cpu not OEM...that version does NOT have a heatsink fan...

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 24, 2003 4:36:54 AM

and to build it...you will need a philips head screw driver...a flathead...and pliers (to cut the zip ties)

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 24, 2003 4:52:04 AM

should i come out spending less money this way? or is it just the enjoyment of putting it together myself? lol
July 24, 2003 5:10:30 AM

both...

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 24, 2003 5:19:28 AM

mobo choice?
case choice?
July 24, 2003 5:51:27 AM

case: aliminum turbo gamer SX 1040 server case 425W
CPU: (800 FSB)Intel P4 3.2
MOBO: ABIT IC7 I875PE 800Mhz FSB DUAL DDR 8X AGP
sony 16X dvd-rom (i would switch to lite on bad sony experience
sony cdrw 52X24X52 EIDE (same as above)
FAN: INTEL certified cpu fan & heatsink (the boxed unit is fine if you are not overclocking)
mitsumi 1.44MB floppy
80GB 7200 RPM ATA 100Hard Drive (recomend maxtor or wester digital...make sure it has 8mb cache)
windows Xp pro
sound: creative labs SB audigy-2 platinum 6.1
speakers: Klipsch Promedia THX 5.1 subwoofer system
video: ATI RADEON 9800 PRO 128MB
2x 512 corsair value ram

This is fine...but case is your decision...i would recomend sticking with the major case brands as i have seen alot of just terribly made cases...enermax...antec....cheiftech...i will note that enermax cases although good quality come with very cheep oem powersupplies (not made by enermax)...a good antec....forton...or enermax powersupply or 350-400 watts would be fine...

The only thing that is missing is memory...if you are not overclocking i would go with 2x 512 of corsair value ram...as intel dual channel boards are picky about memory

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 24, 2003 12:09:23 PM

The money you are spending buy a good case with a top notch PSU. Do not buy cheap CPU. Big mistake.
July 24, 2003 12:31:23 PM

Quote:
Do not buy cheap CPU

I think he ment PSU (power supply) - not CPU. Your 3.2 gig P4 800FSB is tops right now.



<b><font color=red>It depends on what the meaning of the word "is" is. - Bill Clinton<b><font color=red>
July 24, 2003 3:49:33 PM

would i be better off to buy a barebones system?
July 24, 2003 4:12:23 PM

Quote:
should i come out spending less money this way? or is it just the enjoyment of putting it together myself? lol

To give you an idea, I <i>just</i> built myself a new system. (All parts were ordered from Newegg at that.) It cost me about $1600 in the end, and most of the parts were retail packaging so that I'd have long waranties.

I went to Dell and configured a system as close to my specs as I could get. Even then, the Dell system had similar numbers but it was built with parts of a lower quality and came with less software. The Dell system cost just under $2700.

So I saved over a grand by building my PC. :) 

Yeah, it took a little while and was frustrating at times. (Some of that frustration was my own stupid fault though for trying to rush building it late one night.) To me though it was worth it in the end. :) 

But then you also have to keep in mind that I work on PCs fairly regularly, so I'm used to doing this kind of work. So of course I'll say that it's worth it. :o 

It's really not that hard though anymore. These days cables are pretty hard to even plug in upside-down or backwards, processors just fall right into their sockets, and the Pentium4's stock heat sink installation was the easiest that I've ever done. (Even if the instructions were truly awful.) The only really hard part are all of those darned leads from the front panel to the motherboard. (Like the power switch, the reset switch, the hard drive activity light, etc.) And that's still pretty straight forward. It is just hard because the cables still go onto tiny sets of pins that are awfully close together instead of having a nice socket like hard drives and power cables have. You need really tiny fingers (or tweasers, or really thin pliers) to plug those in quickly. Otherwise it's a lot of blind-aiming hit-or-miss work where you don't know if you've connected the cable to the right pins until you let go of the cable and get your fat fingers out of the way. **ROFL**

(And in my case it was especially annoying because I also had front-panel audio jacks, USB ports, and a Firewire port to run cables to the mobo for as well, and they were all connected on a pin-by-pin basis, where the standard front-panel cables are at least grouped together better than that.)

Still, instructions are pretty easy to follow these days and everything is a lot easier now than it was in the old days. So I'd say that unless you're really nervous you should give it a shot to assemble it yourself if you want. Just be <i>sure</i> to buy an anti-static wrist strap and to wear it at all times (and ground it at all times) so that you don't fry anything. If you do that, you follow the instructions, and you're gentle with the parts when you put the PC together, then not much is likely to go wrong. (Though some times connections will be stiff since all of the parts are new and you'll have to use a bit of forse, but even then just use slow and gentle force.)

And if something <i>does</i> go wrong then we're always here for advice. :) 

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
July 24, 2003 4:13:36 PM

I missed that one. Thanks for pointing that out.
July 24, 2003 5:57:45 PM

Speaking for those of us with "tiny fingers" (as defined by the fact I can plug in those things quickly) I will also warn you to beware of parallax. Just because they all went in in a minute and look like they're in the right place doesn't mean they are. This will become obvious when nothing happens. Some MoBo's have gotten good about clearly lableing the lead's pins, but others you need a magnifying glass and I often must use a flashlight.
July 24, 2003 6:41:42 PM

Quote:
Speaking for those of us with "tiny fingers" (as defined by the fact I can plug in those things quickly) I will also warn you to beware of parallax. Just because they all went in in a minute and look like they're in the right place doesn't mean they are. This will become obvious when nothing happens. Some MoBo's have gotten good about clearly lableing the lead's pins, but others you need a magnifying glass and I often must use a flashlight.

True. I couldn't read the mobo lettering for the life of me. I just relied on the manual and the pins that were still exposed when all was said and done. It also helps to know that black is ground since the cables and instructions don't always detail this very well (if at all).

They definately haven't made this part of the process any easier over the years. It's kind of sad really. You would have thought that by now some bright spark would have written a good standard for a cable with a socket that we could all use. (And mobos could just continue to leave the old pin method on as well for older cases.)

"<i>Yeah, if you treat them like equals, it'll only encourage them to think they <b>ARE</b> your equals.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030603" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
July 24, 2003 9:52:34 PM

Where's IEEE when they actually might be able to do something useful. I say make a motherboard LED configuration standard and then have the case manufacturers make LEDs whose wires are bundled together. Many cases i see now have USB and audio cables in the front, maybe the mobo's + cases could find a good way to make this standard as well. The next time i buy a case and mobo, if someone had this standard system out, i would gladly pay 15-20 more just to not go through the hassle of "BOOT, check lights, turn off, switch wires, BOOT...".

I'm just your average habitual smiler =D
!