Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

CREATIVE versus LOGITECH

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
April 7, 2011 9:26:08 AM

Hi guys,

1) what is the difference between HOME AUDIO and COMPUTER SPEAKERS?
How do we compare home audio (home theater/LCD TV ) speakers with
5.1 /7.1 computer speakers?

2) 5.1 / 7.1 speakers , please compare CREATIVE INSPIRE series with some middle price LOGITECH / EDIFIER


Thanks
April 7, 2011 6:01:55 PM

home theatre tends to have higher wattage rating. thats the main difference.
they will also have bigger drivers so they have larger dispersion, this does not usually mean louder, but it will fill the room more easily and speakers placement wont be a fuss.
if you buy home theatre packages from asian electronics company, such as samsung and LG, then buy the higher end ones otherwise, you are better off buying a logitech....

2) logitech will be louder, and bassier, quality wise there is not that much difference... heck they are proper COMPUTER speakers, and that aint a compliment.... get the logitech.
April 7, 2011 8:16:13 PM

seems like the audiophile category for computer speakers has grown.
you arent completely forced to look at home audio speakers for better sound.
Related resources
April 7, 2011 9:37:16 PM

Thanks guys,

Currently in need to buy speakers to use with my computer supporting 7.1 audio,

in future, I will buy LED HD TV and would need speakers there too,

so I thought buy a middle price good one and use with both of them as needed.

So wattage and dispersion is the only difference?

Is this a myth / fact ? that computer speaker output is low but crisp & clear compared to home theater

April 7, 2011 10:51:48 PM

the watts going to the speaker will tell you if the output is low in volume.
April 9, 2011 4:16:30 PM

sunnyimran said:
Thanks guys,

Currently in need to buy speakers to use with my computer supporting 7.1 audio,

in future, I will buy LED HD TV and would need speakers there too,

so I thought buy a middle price good one and use with both of them as needed.

So wattage and dispersion is the only difference?

Is this a myth / fact ? that computer speaker output is low but crisp & clear compared to home theater


myth??? lol not true at all strictly speaking, it all depends on the sensitivity, most computer speakers have over 85dB/watt whereas home theatre are around 85 or even lower, especially the high end ones -there pigs to drive...

proffesional PA speakers and cinema are the most efficient, with most speakers over105dB/watt. concerts only need about 10000 watts (e.g. outdoor venues) and thats saying something, compared to some stuck up car audio fags, with over 50000watts that can only fill a large hall...
April 9, 2011 4:29:57 PM

not much different comparing home receivers and amplifiers.
they give us watts and moderate distortion values.. that still leaves much room (and blindness) between different amplifiers.
dont know what is what, as if we are too stupid to learn.

low harmonic distortion isnt the same as having transients (or even transient distortion)
you need both if you want to rise above the junk.
April 9, 2011 5:47:39 PM

so it all depends on quality, senesitivity, output db/watt be it computer speaker or home theater or Amps system, or car audio.....


April 9, 2011 10:02:46 PM

anwaypasible said:
not much different comparing home receivers and amplifiers.
they give us watts and moderate distortion values.. that still leaves much room (and blindness) between different amplifiers.
dont know what is what, as if we are too stupid to learn.

low harmonic distortion isnt the same as having transients (or even transient distortion)
you need both if you want to rise above the junk.


u mean low harmonic distortion has no relation to transients? cos if so then yes, theorectucally, they have no relation watsoevaaaa.
April 10, 2011 5:23:31 AM

Right now, my speakers(2.1 creative) are driven with a low end 7.1 PC audio with integrated Realtek RTL1200 chip on my mobo.

I want to buy a low to middle budget 7.1 speakers, then later a middle budget sound card and also want to use same speakers with LED TV system.

Use is occassional and selected music audio, occassional gaming but whenever played, should give audio charm. Due to occassional use, low to medium budget.



April 10, 2011 10:57:01 AM

Quote:
Its not what it outputs its what driving the speakers. Normally using a pc you have a smaller amp/receiver thats able to power any bigger speakers where home theatre av receivers come in all shapes in sizes from low powered to high powered.
First you need to look what will be driving them then you match the speakers to avoid clipping and such.

Whats your budget and we can put you a decent setup together. 5.1 is great more expensive but speaker setup in the day counts with it. The buying the system is the easy part. Setting the speakers just right is the mix and move and sometimes a bit frustrating part. But once you get it spot on a cheap low end system can sound beyond believe. Most people just upgrade theyre speakers thinking its junk coz they really ever setup it up in a perfect 5.1 surround way


just so you know PC speakers dont have a receiver... receiver is an amplifier with a radio receiver, hence why its called a receiver - its not cos it 'receives' signals...
April 10, 2011 2:33:59 PM

Quote:
probably because the amp is build into the speakers the sub normally thats why. All pc speakers got amps built into them unless its teeny lil speakers. A soundcard doesnt have the power to supply enough power to it it will burn. So they all come amps

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


no really...
April 10, 2011 10:13:19 PM

i suppose 'receivers' nowadays are amplifiers that have the ability to receive surround sound formats.
anything with a radio tuner and amplifier is now just a 'radio'
April 11, 2011 9:36:38 AM

receivers are an amplifiers with a receiver. lol there is no denotation of recieving a signal.. despite what format.
April 11, 2011 4:58:07 PM

MEgamer said:
receivers are an amplifiers with a receiver. lol there is no denotation of recieving a signal.. despite what format.



for instance..
an amplifier with a radio is a TUNER

because the amplifier can receive a signal from the tape deck or record player.. that means its an amplifier.
you might want to say 'the dial for selecting tape or radio makes it a receiver'
well that isnt true.
the same way a knob adjusts the frequency on the radio.. the other knob adjusts the inputs.
therefore its a TUNER, until it can receive a digital surround format.
and the reason they call it a receiver is because the listener 'receives' more realism from the video with surround sound.


such a thing as strong stereo effects back then (could pan from front to back) ... yea sure.
but the output wasnt dedicated, and the pan wasnt extreme or controllable.
people tried to pickup the name 'receiver' because of such low distortions.
April 13, 2011 12:29:38 AM

integrated amplifiers are simply an amp.
receivers have to process a digital signal.

sorry of you that you cant define 'tuner'

and no.. an A/V surround sound unit does NOT have to have five internal amplifiers.
the entire capacitor bank can be a solid unit, and each transistor is connected to the bank.
thats ONE amp with five outputs.

being confused is one thing.. arguing with me after i have given you a clear definition is totally dumb.
April 13, 2011 8:57:27 AM

anwaypasible said:
for instance..
an amplifier with a radio is a TUNER

because the amplifier can receive a signal from the tape deck or record player.. that means its an amplifier.
you might want to say 'the dial for selecting tape or radio makes it a receiver'
well that isnt true.
the same way a knob adjusts the frequency on the radio.. the other knob adjusts the inputs.
therefore its a TUNER, until it can receive a digital surround format.
and the reason they call it a receiver is because the listener 'receives' more realism from the video with surround sound.


such a thing as strong stereo effects back then (could pan from front to back) ... yea sure.
but the output wasnt dedicated, and the pan wasnt extreme or controllable.
people tried to pickup the name 'receiver' because of such low distortions.


lmao srsly... what the point saying all this... everybody knows (anyone with knowledge of electronics, or has been taking any courses) that a reciever is any electronic device, with a broadcast detector, whether or not it has a relation to amplifiers.... TVs and telephones have receivers... they do the same thing, they receiver radio waves.... look up on google, or eevn your dictionary....

ur taking the term RECEIVER a little literally...

'audiophiles' that have been spending time only in 'audiophilic forums' never seem to know these basic terms... same goes for V=IR...

btw tuner is only a part of the receiver... tuners need to be fed into an amplifier, whereas reciever have amps integrated into it.

being confused is one thing.. arguing with me after i have given you a clear definition is totally dumb
April 14, 2011 3:53:07 AM

sure, everybody can say ANY electronic device is a receiver.
but if they are asking for a custom built piece of hardware, they will be paying more when their tuner comes with analog AND digital inputs.

BROADcast.. see the specifics of broad.
because its broad, it requires a tuner to narrow in on the small portion necessary.

'receiving' (of magnitude) requires a DVD portion to have more than one method of input (analog or digital)
if the amplifier has inputs for many different things, but all inputs are analog.. the amplifier is filed as 'integrated'

and that is the real reason of any arguement or confusion.
why does an amplifier have its classification changed simply because there are more than one input.

the word 'integrated' has bounty.
when you turn the dial, the artistic label put forth to the action is 'integrate'
but the same word can be used when adding features to a simple amplifier.. causing confusion of the word 'implement'

one word means 'to add to the current functionality'
the other word means 'to add to seperate functionality'

so with that said, adding an amplifier to the analog preamp outputs.. its an example of adding to the current functionality.
not to be confused with adding a clock or LED display to the amplifier that expresses which input is being used, as that is a seperate functionality of amplifying the audio.
the LED display can amplify the quality of the piece of hardware as it sits.
but adding a VU meter would also be adding to the current functionality IF and WHEN the VU meter is calibrated to indicate when the amplifier starts to clip the soundwaves.
as a monitoring device, it is adding to the current functionality as a safety monitor.
not to be confused with a safety monitor being the same functionality as amplifying the audio.
again, not to confuse 'amplifying the audio' with 'amplifying the audio with monitored safety'

it is a disgusting language that hasnt even begun to use english (as in billiards).

could be taken as a light joke, as it pokes fun.
but i think defining receiver and tuner has little to do with creative versus logitech.. because neither one of them have a tuner.

simply answering the question is 'living'
but
going into details about receiver or tuner is 'living wild'

although some might say answering the question isnt worth 'living'
and going into explanations astray from the original topic is 'living'

people are entitled to their own artistic expression as the accuracy can, will, and does diminish.
April 14, 2011 5:39:52 PM

u can keep trying it again and again, but everytime u come to compare the 2, there is no difference yet the receiver will have a tuner.

"why does an amplifier have its classification changed simply because there are more than one input."

... just so you know a name (receiver) doesnt change its classification.
!