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Intel Prescott to Dissipate More than 100W of Heat

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July 27, 2003 12:22:40 AM

<A HREF="http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/display/20030725155324..." target="_new"> Hottie Hungry Prescott</A>

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More about : intel prescott dissipate 100w heat

July 27, 2003 12:41:06 AM

Already another topic about this, and who really cares if it runs hot? Intel has a better track record than Amd on keeping their cpu's cool
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July 27, 2003 1:56:52 AM

I'm seeing people overclocking their Northwoods up to 4GHz and beyond, so YOU BET that there are a few boards which can support CPU loads in excess of 100W.

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July 27, 2003 4:57:59 AM

if trends continue with pcs putting out more and more heat, water cooling will become neccisary. and air conditioned rooms will be neccissary just to keep the room from heating up so much.

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July 27, 2003 10:47:32 AM

I read somwhere that in the next few years CPU's are going to generate the same amount of heat (proportionatly) as a nuclear power plant. Unless they find a new technoligy. Interesting eh.
July 27, 2003 2:46:18 PM

With all that heat we can put the heating companies out of business. Just run your computer all day. You will not have to turn the heat on in the winter months.
July 27, 2003 4:11:41 PM

Quote:
Intel Prescott to Dissipate More than 100W of Heat

So ... I have lighting fixtures that do the same - and I can't surf the porn sites with my table lamp ...



<b><font color=red>It depends on what the meaning of the word "is" is. - Bill Clinton<b><font color=red>
July 27, 2003 5:47:25 PM

in a few years (or maby more) down the road I have a feeling that things are going to change in a major way, intel knows it can't just keep improving it's cooling methods, it won't become cost efficient to run them, if we're talking about it in one of these forums I'll bet money intel was thinking aobut it a few years ago
July 27, 2003 7:40:45 PM

Yes, they might need to move to a more efficient method for squeezing some extra performance out of their processors. Even Itanium at 1.5Ghz consumes 100+W of power...

Even so, they actually do have quite a lot of headroom in cooling solutions; the problem is, however, that more powerful cooling might be cumbersome and expensive... Like water cooling, for example. And solutions which make the processor more expensive are not that welcome.

Maybe stacking processing layers on top of each other and creating a three-dimensional processor would help, for instance: the space between layers could be flooded with some insulator fluid with great thermal conduction... But can you imagine trying to build such a processor? It would be a more sophisticated process... Just an idea of mine... They could, for starters, produce the main processing parts on one layer, and the cache on another... two layers only... if well done, this could of course dramatically reduce the distance between components!

Has anyone around here ever thought about how high 3Ghz actually is? Light itself only travels 10 centimeters (like 4 inches) in this time!...

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 27, 2003 8:08:13 PM

Quote:
Maybe stacking processing layers on top of each other and creating a three-dimensional processor would help ...

I have read that Intel is already working on a 3-D Solution due to limits of 2-D gate proximity.



<b><font color=red>It depends on what the meaning of the word "is" is. - Bill Clinton<b><font color=red>
July 27, 2003 8:12:01 PM

<i>Really?</i> That's nice... Do you, by any chance, remember where you read that?...

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 27, 2003 8:17:02 PM

they have also worked with submersion methods for cooling, although have run into problems.. (for servers or course)
July 27, 2003 8:23:37 PM

So soon our CPU's will be traveling at the speed of light. What happens when we break the light speed barrier? Will rou PC make a loud noise when you turn it on (as it breaks the light barrier)? Or will it just go back in time?
July 27, 2003 8:37:26 PM

i was always quite excited about the prescott, but the more info that surfaces the poorer it looks;

1)astronomical power consumption
2)rediculous price
3)will use packaging that will be quickly replaced => no upgrade path
4)probably relatively little speed increse due to already having 800mhz bus, pni will not be used by software for a while, and longer pipeline, cant complain about 1mb of cache though.
5)apparently incompatible with a lot of present mobos.

oh well, it may be a blessing for A64
July 27, 2003 8:43:33 PM

Price for Prescott $637. A64 about the same.
July 27, 2003 8:51:58 PM

I tried to find the original article - tried to google it, but no luck - didn't feel like looking too long, sorry. But it's been within a couple of months.



<b><font color=red>It depends on what the meaning of the word "is" is. - Bill Clinton<b><font color=red>
July 27, 2003 9:40:44 PM

I am a bit surprised you never heard of Tri-Gate transistors!
Intel made quite a buzz and THG had Hard News on it.

<A HREF="http://www.intel.com/pressroom/archive/releases/2002091..." target="_new">http://www.intel.com/pressroom/archive/releases/2002091...;/A>
Here ya go. There are other articles on the Intel website regarding that as well.


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July 27, 2003 10:24:02 PM

Thanks about that, Eden... I guess I saw that back then, but didn't really follow the links and read up on stuff.

BTW, excellent way to draw some attention to your sig/link... ROFL! You can make it bold, you can even make it red, but having the THG album link with such a text on it is a no brainer! It works... :smile:

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 28, 2003 12:12:06 AM

Quote:
BTW, excellent way to draw some attention to your sig/link... ROFL! You can make it bold, you can even make it red, but having the THG album link with such a text on it is a no brainer! It works...

<A HREF="http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/modules.php?nam..." target="_new"> Another similar way to get attention</A>

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July 28, 2003 2:52:03 PM

Quote:
So soon our CPU's will be traveling at the speed of light. What happens when we break the light speed barrier? Will rou PC make a loud noise when you turn it on (as it breaks the light barrier)? Or will it just go back in time?

ROFLMAO! I highly doubt that electricity can go the speed of light. There is just more of it moving around in a small area, not a small amount going super fast. If that made any sense.

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July 28, 2003 4:38:47 PM

It's not exactly like that, I'm afraid... actually, here is the thing: <b>Electrical signals travel at the speed of light</b> in the medium they are travelling through, period. So an electrical signal travels through copper as fast as light would travel through copper. Period. Electricity already travels at the speed of light, even inside our processors, and it will neither get faster nor slower...

Picture this: if you're on the beach, immersed in water, and lightning strikes, you'll see the lightning strike exactly at the same time you feel the shock. You might not feel much later, though... :wink:

What changes is the operating frequency of the circuitry...

<i>*crazy imagination leap coming*</i>
But hey, you might be able to apply specific distortions in time that make you process faster because of time warping. That might be conceivable for the next, say, one thousand years. It's very far-fetched, but as far as physics is concerned, it might just be possible. Time warping exists, but only in the most extreme conditions... So if you had a gazillion watts to spend, you could do it...
<i>*crazy imagination leap over*</i>

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 28, 2003 4:44:24 PM

electrons actually travel at about 3metres per second if i remember correctly, butgive the impression of travelling fast because they "push" eachother, a bit like water in a hose pipe (hose pipe already got water in it), when you turn the tap on, water comes out straight away, but the water isnt traveling very fast, its just that the hose was already full.....idoubt that made any sense
July 28, 2003 4:51:32 PM

Don't worry, it is exactly like that, and that makes perfect sense.

Actually, electrons typically travel at around 15±5 centimeters every hour or so. So they're even slower than 3m/s. But the information they carry is transported at the speed of light. That's why I used the term "electrical signal" - to avoid precisely that issue. The electrons do not and could not possibly be travelling at the speed of light; they're not massless.

I even used the same example you used - the water on a pipe thingie - to explain this <A HREF="http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/modules.php?nam..." target="_new">before</A>, on a future tech thread or so...

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 28, 2003 4:52:52 PM

actualy the speed of electrons is slower than that...it is in the cm per hour range...dont remember the exact # though...

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 28, 2003 4:53:00 PM

I find the 'ball bearings in a straw' analogy better.. if you have a tube full of ball bearings, and they're all touching each other, then no matter the length of the tube, you'll still have 1 bearing pop out instantly at one end if you insert one at the other....

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July 28, 2003 4:55:21 PM

Quote:
So an electrical signal travels through copper as fast as light would travel through copper.

Copper is opaque, light can't travel thru it. So how do you know how fast light goes thru something that is opaque?

Quote:
Picture this: if you're on the beach, immersed in water, and lightning strikes, you'll see the lightning strike exactly at the same time you feel the shock.

Water is a completely different story though compaired to copper. And processors aren't made using copper, its silicon. So thats another diffferent story. Do you know how fast light is? Our senses wouldn't even know the difference of how fast electricity and light are; they are both way too fast for us to differentiate. But I'm sure there is a measureable difference in speed between the two, they must travel at different speeds IMO. I'll be searching for a proof url, I hope you'll do the same to try back up your story. Good luck.

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July 28, 2003 5:14:51 PM

OK... To back up my story, here it goes: I'm a physicist. Is that enough for you?... :wink: I study physics for life... doesn't mean I know everything, of course... or that I don't make mistakes... but, to my knowledge, this is how it works.

Quote:
Copper is opaque, light can't travel thru it. So how do you know how fast light goes thru something that is opaque?

Sure it can. You don't think that, by "light", I mean that which you can actually <i>see</i>, do you? I mean electromagnetic waves. What is that spectrum you can see, really? It is a small piece of the whole electromagnetic spectrum only. Waves with shorter wavelength are typically X-ray waves and gamma rays, for instance - and copper is not very challenging for gamma rays. Waves with longer wavelength are also possible, like radio waves.
Quote:
Water is a completely different story though compaired to copper. And processors aren't made using copper, its silicon. So thats another diffferent story.

Is it? I mean, yes, light travels slower through silicon than it does through the air, and also not at the same speed than in copper. But it travels at the same speed than electricity, because, while the material's properties changed, the laws of physics are still in place.
Quote:
Do you know how fast light is? Our senses wouldn't even know the difference of how fast electricity and light are; they are both way too fast for us to differentiate. But I'm sure there is a measureable difference in speed between the two, they must travel at different speeds IMO.

My senses can't tell them apart or measure those speeds either, but my mind can tell you that electricity - as you'd call the electrical signal - travels <i>exactly</i> at the speed of light in the same material.

According to quantum field theory, photons - the particle version of light - are the messengers for what you'd know as the electric repulsion between electrons. They're therefore responsible for that "pushing" that happens inside the water pipe/hose or whatever... so the pushing happens at the speed the photons travel - also known as the speed of... <i>light</i>.

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Mephistopheles on 07/28/03 02:39 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
July 28, 2003 5:45:14 PM

Any other question FallOutBoyTonto
heheh
July 28, 2003 5:54:47 PM

i got 1 that i am too lazy to research for...what is lights speed through air? Does temp. impact lights speed?

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 28, 2003 6:16:55 PM

i know its 300,000,000 meters per second in vacuum, and slower in air,

"does temp affect speed?", yes, as it would change the air density
July 28, 2003 6:19:11 PM

but photons are non matter...so how would that effect it?

So easy to fry yet tastes so good...
Silicon: The other, other, other white meat :evil: 
July 28, 2003 6:24:24 PM

Quote:
I'm a physicist. Is that enough for you?

Not anywhere near enough! LOL, I've got a bit of education in physics too, although it isn't my life I'm sure I understand most of it. That's why I was so adament in what I'm trying to say.

Quote:
You don't think that, by "light", I mean that which you can actually see, do you?

Actually that's exactly what I was meaning. What I consider "light" is the visible spectrum of wavelength that human eyes see. Anything else, I would say exactly what it is, electromagnetic waves; not light. Thats what confused me.

Quote:
light travels slower through silicon than it does through the air, and also not at the same speed than in copper. But it travels at the same speed than electricity, because, while the material's properties changed, the laws of physics are still in place.

Yup, I agree with you there. But our differences are coming up now;

Quote:
but my mind can tell you that electricity - as you'd call the electrical signal - travels exactly at the speed of light in the same material.

This is the part were we are travelling down different roads. I've been talking about the speed of electrons, not the electrical signal. I like the analogy of the water in a tube; although when you push in at one end, the other end is coming out right away. That would be the speed of light if you measure the time it takes from the push in one end to the output on the other end. But that isn't the same particle that went out. I've been referring to the same particle, that would take way longer. Also, <A HREF="http://www.jimloy.com/physics/electric.htm" target="_new">this</A> explains what I'm saying very well. Maybe thats the proof that we are both right, just in different views.

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July 28, 2003 6:37:30 PM

Light's speed through air is around 99,9% of the speed of light in vacuum, commonly called <i>c</i>.

The formula that controls this is a very, very simple one:

<b>v = c / n</b>, where
v: speed of light inside particular material
c: speed of light in vacuum
n: index of refraction (IOR) of that particular material (vacuum = 1)

Therefore, because air (at ordinary conditions) has an IOR of 1.00029, light will travel at 0.9997c through it, or 99.97% of the speed of light in vacuum.

A few other examples include water, in which light travels at around 0.75c (IOR 1.33) and diamond, in which light travels at only 0.41c (IOR 2.42). Diamond is, of course, a good example of how slowly light can go through a typical non-opaque material; however, several salts have IORs which are higher than diamond's IOR, even reaching numbers above 5 or so. Inside these materials, light will travel at less than 20% the speed it would have in vacuum.

Actually, I can find out the speed of light inside silicon for you people, if you like. It's a simple calculation, but I'll have to get the two fundamental magnetic and electric properties of silicon first. I'll look it up in some constants handbook...

Ooo, wait, there was one more question...
Quote:
Does temp. impact lights speed?

<i>Hey, good question.</i>Yes, temperature does make a difference, because it changes the fundamental properties of the materials. The exact relation between those two is not simple, however. Atmospheric Air in particular, however, will change a lot if heated... and as densities change, so does the IOR.

On hot days, cars sometimes have these heat halos (just as in desert illusions), don't they? That's because the density of the air changes inside that small turbulence, effectively altering the IOR along that bit of air and changing your perception of what lies beyond that bit of air - distorting your view.

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 28, 2003 6:47:52 PM

Quote:
Any other question FallOutBoyTonto

Yes, just a couple more thoughts.

Quote:
Electrical signals travel at the speed of light in the medium they are travelling through, period.

Wouldn't it be therotically possible to travel faster than light? Like ChipDeath's analogy says,

Quote:
I find the 'ball bearings in a straw' analogy better.. if you have a tube full of ball bearings, and they're all touching each other, then no matter the length of the tube, you'll still have 1 bearing pop out instantly at one end if you insert one at the other

If you have a long enough straw, then the time it takes to travel from point A to point B and if the straw is very very long then it would be travelling faster than light. But your previous post said <b>"Electrical signals travel at the speed of light</b> in the medium they are travelling through, period." The way you say it, it sounds like its a constant, when its actually variable depending on the length of the "straw". :smile:

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July 28, 2003 7:04:06 PM

Quote:
If you have a long enough straw, then the time it takes to travel from point A to point B and if the straw is very very long then it would be travelling faster than light. But your previous post said "Electrical signals travel at the speed of light in the medium they are travelling through, period." The way you say it, it sounds like its a constant, when its actually variable depending on the length of the "straw".

Well, while the analogy is a good one, the word "instantaneously" is a little inaccurate... Actually, it does take time for an electrical signal to get around. Light speed is independent of the length of the wire you put it in... it is dependent on the material you put it in, though.

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 28, 2003 7:05:31 PM

Cool observations......but I think a little more research has to be done :smile:

I won't get into a lot of detail here, but just touch on a couple things:
Electromagnetic waves are not light; this is not specific enough, for electromagnetic waves describes more than just light. Electromagnetic radiation may have been closer, but even that is not specific enough.

All energy is affected by the medium through which it travels and the conditions of that medium. Therefore heat and pressure do affect them, and do affect the speed of light.

Electrons do not travel at the speed of light, but energy transfer associated with an orbital change, or when bonding occurs does travel at the speed of light.

Now this one is a little harder to understand without an explanation, but if u're interested you can look it up. Light does not travel through a copper wire. Energy does travel through this wire, but there are many forms of energy. Our good ole buddy Max Planck showed this energy flow as the movement of electrons, not electromagnetic waves (wave theory of light), nor photons (particle theory of light). And through my own research and experimentation, I believe these current theories.

Which brings me to, all these things that I have stated are based on our current beliefs. At one time we thought the world was flat, but that was later proven wrong. Perhaps these ideas will stand in light of later discovery, and perhaps we will once again learn that "the world simply isn't flat."

If u want my credentials, I have a degree in bio-chem and chemical engineering. I currently work in a bio-medical research and development lab. But please don't take my word on this, please look it up, for there is much more than what I briefly said here.


--the Doc
July 28, 2003 7:35:43 PM

Quote:
I won't get into a lot of detail here, but just touch on a couple things:
Electromagnetic waves are not light; this is not specific enough, for electromagnetic waves describes more than just light. Electromagnetic radiation may have been closer, but even that is not specific enough.

This is actually a nomenclature problem, not a physical one. If you use the terms "infrared light" and "ultraviolet light", then light is more than only visible electromagnetic waves.

And Electromagnetic waves are not necessarily visible light, of course - visible light is always an electromagnetic wave. But my original post mentioned "speed of light inside a copper wire" - and that puzzled some people around here. That's why I used "light" as in "electromagnetic radiation" - and I've seen people use similar terms loosely... and they were phds in physics, mind you.
Quote:
All energy is affected by the medium through which it travels and the conditions of that medium. Therefore heat and pressure do affect them, and do affect the speed of light.

Indeed, that is true.
Quote:
Electrons do not travel at the speed of light, but energy transfer associated with an orbital change, or when bonding occurs does travel at the speed of light.

That's because the electric forces as we know them acting on electrons are "carried out" by photons. This is a new notion that is included in Quantum field theory; it's a bit obscure though... But that is the reason why electrity travels at the speed of light in the medium it is in. And loosely speaking, you'd understand "speed of light" as actually being "speed of electromagnetic radiation/waves"... No big deal. But, if you want it peachy-keen, ...
Quote:
Light does not travel through a copper wire.

Visible light does not travel through a copper wire, that's for sure. Electromagnetic waves are capable of, but not all of them do (as visible light - it does not).
Quote:
Energy does travel through this wire, but there are many forms of energy. Our good ole buddy Max Planck showed this energy flow as the movement of electrons, not electromagnetic waves (wave theory of light), nor photons (particle theory of light).

The problem with just saying "energy travels" and "lots of forms of energy" is that you quickly lose your point. The way you said it, Planck showed that all energy flow is from electron movement alone. This is a very strange statement... What was your point?...

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 28, 2003 7:39:55 PM

Quote:
Light speed is independent of the length of the wire you put it in... it is dependent on the material you put it in, though.

OK, that makes sense. I stand corrected. At least I admit to being wrong, can you admit that we were talking about different things? And that <A HREF="http://www.jimloy.com/physics/electric.htm" target="_new">this web page</A> shows both views?

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July 28, 2003 8:07:33 PM

Quote:
BTW, excellent way to draw some attention to your sig/link... ROFL! You can make it bold, you can even make it red, but having the THG album link with such a text on it is a no brainer! It works...


Yup hehe, figured there are too many blindheads over at the hardware forums here, so I knew sex would sell! :wink:

But damn it, too many wussies in here, not wanting to appear on the precious THGC album... :frown:

--
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July 28, 2003 8:08:56 PM

Yes, the english language is very imprecise when describing many things, and it is an obstacle sometimes-- what one person names a certain object or phenomenon. That's why I said I was only briefly touching on these points, and they should be looked up and researched on their own :smile:

In respect to the "electon forces" being carried out by photons, I will comment briefly on that. The photon and electromagnetic wave doesn't exactly "push" on the electron if this is what u mean. The energy is absorbed, or transferred from one body to another. This energy transfer is what causes the electron movement.
Every atom can only absorb a certain amount of energy or certain wavelength. We view this everyday with what we look at. When u see, for instance, the color brown in a piece of wood, you are seeing what is being reflected to you from the visible spectrum. All other wavelengths are being absorbed as wave/particle energy. When an electron attains a certain amount of energy, it can change orbitals. Now, the electron does not move at the speed of light, but the energy emitted with the transfer takes place is what gives of light, hence moving at the speed of light. So yes, in a way you could say that the photon/wave moved the electron, but it really didn't--was the cause of the momvement. Anyways, once again we come back to what we mean by what we say :smile:
This is all cool stuff though, I could talk about this everyday, all the time. And from what I can see, quite a few others are interested in these ideas. There are many good sources to look up all this information online or in the library. I would recommend the "CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics". I have the last 5 editions, and use them on a regular basis. They are a great source of information, or just references to equations and constants for your own calculations.
Cool stuff though Meph! It's good to see someone else so interested in these ideas. It's not often I get to talk about these things outside of work.


--the Doc
July 28, 2003 8:27:08 PM

Quote:
But damn it, too many wussies in here, not wanting to appear on the precious THGC album... :frown:

I tried to get a picture, but it broke my camera. :o 

No, seriously, I've got one on film that I'm waiting to get processed. Give me time. Hopefully the picture will turn out, I'll be able to scan it alright, and then I'll join in. :) 

You know ... it's almost wrong somehow to promise 'The sexiest website ever' and then show <b>us</b>.

"<i>Let's see what <b>Paragraph 84-B</b> has to say about it.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030724" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
July 28, 2003 8:34:30 PM

ROFL!

But we ARE sex dolls, look at us!

Svol's a deary, Scammy's got his girlfriend up on his site and is one lucky bastard, LHGPoobaa and Melb_Angel have their own combined site since they are together, and are absolutely great together.
IMO it bedazzles me to see so little reaction to the sigs I previously used to advertise it. I'm hoping everyday more will try to post their pics. It's fun and simple, and it's a way to meet the others on the other line.

The wussy part btw is true. I know one, but won't name names.

--
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July 28, 2003 8:44:48 PM

I don't suppose there's a way to get rid of all of those annoying popups on the album site...

That was just <i>really</i> annoying.

"<i>Let's see what <b>Paragraph 84-B</b> has to say about it.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030724" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
July 28, 2003 9:02:05 PM

Quote:
In respect to the "electon forces" being carried out by photons, I will comment briefly on that. The photon and electromagnetic wave doesn't exactly "push" on the electron if this is what u mean. The energy is absorbed, or transferred from one body to another. This energy transfer is what causes the electron movement.

Yes, that is what I meant. Of course, I used the term "pushing", which is somewhat inaccurate in the exact sense, but it does a good service of showing what is going on. It is an energy transfer in the broadest sense, of course, and I could get into it in more detail... Like you said, those who are really interested can research it a bit and will find out that "pushing" is just a simplification.
Quote:
Yes, the english language is very imprecise when describing many things, and it is an obstacle sometimes-- what one person names a certain object or phenomenon.

I find english to be a somewhat flexible language in comparison to others, and that doesn't really make it harder to describe things - at least not harder than in any other language, that is. These things are not that simple!... :smile:

QFT (as in Quantum field theory), for instance, is a new topic of research and is as of yet an unfinished theory...

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 28, 2003 10:23:53 PM

Oh my yes, the new Google Toolbar is simply amazing, Pop-up blocker with instant disable click on-screen. Recommended to anyone who hates popups. No longer do I suffer visiting the album! :wink:

Mephisto, I want you on the XXX page too! You sexy beast you! :lol: 

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<A HREF="http://www.lochel.com/THGC/album.html" target="_new"><font color=blue><b>The sexiest website ever, guaranteed XXX!!!</font color=blue></b></A> :wink:
July 30, 2003 3:32:08 AM

M-m-m-me? :eek:  Ooo, but if I did that, you'd all know how not-respectable I look like, wouldn't you?... 'cause I look even younger than I am...

Now seriously, I might just do that... I also wanted to make a small website about me and put such a picture on it (one of the nicer ones of me...) I even have this <A HREF="http://www.ifi.unicamp.br/~daviddc/" target="_new">open space</A> available, but I am too lazy to build a site and don't have a scanner... However, I was recently asked to make some file available there, so I might just move my *ss and do something about that open space! If I do scan a picture of me I'll send it to the album too...

But it's kind of stupid... what should I write on my own site?... <i>about myself</i>?... When I start thinking about it, I always get either lost or carried away...

BTW, when will those *coming soon* pictures be available? (and no, it's <b>not</b> just because basmic is one of them and I want to know how he looks! :smile: ... just curious...)

<font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
July 30, 2003 5:09:49 PM

Quote:
I also wanted to make a small website about me and put such a picture on it (one of the nicer ones of me...)

Yikes! That reminds me ... I still have my Geocities site!

Oooh, yuck, what old (and not so stunning) pictures of me there. If I can remember my password and all maybe I'll actually update my own site once I scan in my new photos. **ROFL**

And Geocities still can't run their own servers to save their lives. Their stupid banner code is still (always?) broken so that my pages are constantly popping up errors that aren't even my own fault. :(  I definately can't show that site at any job interviews. **ROFL** Thanks for being so helpful Geocities. They never were any good at programming stuff. But free is free, so I can't complain too much. And of all of the free sites that I've had, they've actually not closed up shop, so that should count for some small tidbit. **LOL**

Anywho, no point in updating until I have the new photos. It's gone so long without work done, why break that habit now? :)  It'll almost be a shame to update it.

"<i>Let's see what <b>Paragraph 84-B</b> has to say about it.</i>" - Thief from <A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=030724" target="_new">8-Bit Theater</A>
July 30, 2003 8:22:25 PM

Well, for starters, you get yer own website on the album and choose whatever you want, background color, layout, etc.
We've been thinking about allowing people to design their own at home and then send the page, but I need to check with Scamtron on his uploading tools to see if he can do that.

As for what putting in there, look at our sites. Most of us went with the base info, name, age and date of birth, place of living or birth. You can add comments if you wanna tout your sexiness :wink: , or put special pics like trip pics and have captions underneath to detail what is in there.
Some put pics of the family like Girlnamedlou, others had their girl/boyfriends, like LHGPoobaa with Melb_Angel19.

Really, it's an all out free site you get, and, if you wanted extra stuff, like my site had with the linked drawings of mine, you can. I don't think we ever refused any request (unless you're not a member, which one did do that and Scamtron refused to put him), and the Rules page says everything there is. The only things we don't deal with as outlined in the Rules page, is porn or pics that don't show you at all clearly (please don't put gas masks on yourselves :smile: ). You CAN show pics without you in them, but the main one on the page HAS to have you at least. And yes, unlimited amount, just preferably under 100KB each, since we got Dial-up users.

I do hope you can get something soon, so as Slvr. As I said many times, it's always a pleasure to have new "ugly people" on the "Wall of uglyness" :wink: !

PS: Scam just announced he began working on the Coming Soon stuff. Yeah it's slow, but I suggested we split the task. I'd prolly do any site as soon as I get pics, and finish it in a few minutes hehe.

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August 1, 2003 12:17:40 AM

Good news guys, album site has been revamped, and the coming soon parts have been completed. (Basmic having left the forum will not be updated right now, and Dwellman has only a pic of his wife for now, he did let us know he will furnish a pic of himself soon, and as for Werx, don't know who that is so ignore his site).

See, we keep our promises! :smile:

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