Resize (reduce) extended partition

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hi,

I am running XP Pro SP2, and have it set up with a primary and extended
partition. Unfortunately, these two partitions use up all the space on my
(only) HDD, although the extended partition has a fair bit of free space in
it.

Firstly, this arrangement of partitions came 'automatically' when I
installed Windows (as far as I am aware anyway).
Is this because when installing Windows, during the setup I asked it to
establish a D and an E partition, as well as the system partition. Based on
my request, did it by default put D and E (as logical volumes) in an
extended partition which consumed the remainder of the disc.
If so, would it be better in future to just create the system partition at
setup, and use Disk Management to create D and E as I see fit (maybe in an
extended partition of my choice of size, or even as their own primary
partitions)?

Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size of the
extended partition (it has loads of free space)? I have looked around, and
people seem to suggest a third party tool of some sort (Partition Magic for
instance) - but there is always a 'sad' story to be found for each of these!
Is there a 'Windows' way to reduce the extended partition size? I suspect
that I know the answer is no. If so, I might take the easy way out and just
buy an extra HDD, and plug it in! I do not really want to risk messing
things up if there is not a firm way of going with this one.

Thanks for any information and advice

Simon
13 answers Last reply
More about resize reduce extended partition
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Simon McDonald" <simon@mcdonaldz11.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:OP7IY5BqFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am running XP Pro SP2, and have it set up with a primary and extended
    > partition. Unfortunately, these two partitions use up all the space on my
    > (only) HDD, although the extended partition has a fair bit of free space
    > in it.
    >
    > Firstly, this arrangement of partitions came 'automatically' when I
    > installed Windows (as far as I am aware anyway).
    > Is this because when installing Windows, during the setup I asked it to
    > establish a D and an E partition, as well as the system partition. Based
    > on my request, did it by default put D and E (as logical volumes) in an
    > extended partition which consumed the remainder of the disc.
    > If so, would it be better in future to just create the system partition at
    > setup, and use Disk Management to create D and E as I see fit (maybe in an
    > extended partition of my choice of size, or even as their own primary
    > partitions)?
    >
    > Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size of
    > the extended partition (it has loads of free space)? I have looked around,
    > and people seem to suggest a third party tool of some sort (Partition
    > Magic for instance) - but there is always a 'sad' story to be found for
    > each of these! Is there a 'Windows' way to reduce the extended partition
    > size? I suspect that I know the answer is no. If so, I might take the easy
    > way out and just buy an extra HDD, and plug it in! I do not really want to
    > risk messing things up if there is not a firm way of going with this one.
    >
    > Thanks for any information and advice
    >
    > Simon


    Simon:
    As you suspect, there is no way for XP to non-destructively manipulate your
    established partitions at this point since your two partitions span the
    entire disk space of the drive.

    You can, as you state, use Partition Magic, to manipulate the partitions
    non-destructively. PM is a solid product and you should not fear using it in
    this circumstance. Naturally, like in all things involving the computer,
    things can go wrong, so it is always prudent to back up critical and/or
    important data before undertaking this process.
    Anna
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    news:ObmpthCqFHA.564@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "Simon McDonald" <simon@mcdonaldz11.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:OP7IY5BqFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I am running XP Pro SP2, and have it set up with a primary and extended
    >> partition. Unfortunately, these two partitions use up all the space on my
    >> (only) HDD, although the extended partition has a fair bit of free space
    >> in it.
    >>
    >> Firstly, this arrangement of partitions came 'automatically' when I
    >> installed Windows (as far as I am aware anyway).
    >> Is this because when installing Windows, during the setup I asked it to
    >> establish a D and an E partition, as well as the system partition. Based
    >> on my request, did it by default put D and E (as logical volumes) in an
    >> extended partition which consumed the remainder of the disc.
    >> If so, would it be better in future to just create the system partition
    >> at setup, and use Disk Management to create D and E as I see fit (maybe
    >> in an extended partition of my choice of size, or even as their own
    >> primary partitions)?
    >>
    >> Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size of
    >> the extended partition (it has loads of free space)? I have looked
    >> around, and people seem to suggest a third party tool of some sort
    >> (Partition Magic for instance) - but there is always a 'sad' story to be
    >> found for each of these! Is there a 'Windows' way to reduce the extended
    >> partition size? I suspect that I know the answer is no. If so, I might
    >> take the easy way out and just buy an extra HDD, and plug it in! I do not
    >> really want to risk messing things up if there is not a firm way of going
    >> with this one.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any information and advice
    >>
    >> Simon
    >
    >
    > Simon:
    > As you suspect, there is no way for XP to non-destructively manipulate
    > your established partitions at this point since your two partitions span
    > the entire disk space of the drive.
    >
    > You can, as you state, use Partition Magic, to manipulate the partitions
    > non-destructively. PM is a solid product and you should not fear using it
    > in this circumstance. Naturally, like in all things involving the
    > computer, things can go wrong, so it is always prudent to back up critical
    > and/or important data before undertaking this process.
    > Anna
    >
    The money spent for Partition Magic would go a long way towards buying
    another hard drive.
    You could move the data from D: and E: to another drive, then redo D: and
    E:.
    --
    Ron Sommer
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Simon McDonald wrote:

    > Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size
    > of the extended partition

    What are you intending to do with the free space on the HDD (not to be
    confused with the free space within the partition) that you create?
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Anna wrote:
    > Simon:
    > As you suspect, there is no way for XP to non-destructively manipulate your
    > established partitions at this point since your two partitions span the
    > entire disk space of the drive.
    >
    > You can, as you state, use Partition Magic, to manipulate the partitions
    > non-destructively. PM is a solid product and you should not fear using it in
    > this circumstance. Naturally, like in all things involving the computer,
    > things can go wrong, so it is always prudent to back up critical and/or
    > important data before undertaking this process.
    > Anna

    Hi, All!
    Personally I prefer Acronis Disk Director
    [http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/diskdirector]. I'm
    really experienced user, to my opinion it's the best partition manager.
    Some time ago I used PM, but it always made boring errors, also I've
    read some bad reviews about this software.
    Anyway, it's only my choice, and I'd like to recommend you to try.
    I must say that Disk Director cheaper than other partition softwares,
    but it doesn't worse, even better. I've never seen such convenient
    intuitive wizard, which doesn't allow you make any change by accident.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    First, you assess the size of the partition needed for XP. Input that
    during the XP install. Leave the remainder of the space alone. Any further
    partitioning should be done in XP, after XP is installed, because it faster
    and easier to visualize.

    PM, correct version of course, in my opinion, should not be used in XP.
    Only from the boot CD. Any mods to a nonboot partition should be preceded
    by removing ownership of that partition. Then, taking ownership again after
    the mod. Just my opinion. Most PM problems originate when either combining
    partitions, or doing too many mods on too many parittions in one session.
    At least, that seems to be the pattern.

    "Simon McDonald" <simon@mcdonaldz11.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:OP7IY5BqFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am running XP Pro SP2, and have it set up with a primary and extended
    > partition. Unfortunately, these two partitions use up all the space on my
    > (only) HDD, although the extended partition has a fair bit of free space
    in
    > it.
    >
    > Firstly, this arrangement of partitions came 'automatically' when I
    > installed Windows (as far as I am aware anyway).
    > Is this because when installing Windows, during the setup I asked it to
    > establish a D and an E partition, as well as the system partition. Based
    on
    > my request, did it by default put D and E (as logical volumes) in an
    > extended partition which consumed the remainder of the disc.
    > If so, would it be better in future to just create the system partition at
    > setup, and use Disk Management to create D and E as I see fit (maybe in an
    > extended partition of my choice of size, or even as their own primary
    > partitions)?
    >
    > Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size of
    the
    > extended partition (it has loads of free space)? I have looked around, and
    > people seem to suggest a third party tool of some sort (Partition Magic
    for
    > instance) - but there is always a 'sad' story to be found for each of
    these!
    > Is there a 'Windows' way to reduce the extended partition size? I suspect
    > that I know the answer is no. If so, I might take the easy way out and
    just
    > buy an extra HDD, and plug it in! I do not really want to risk messing
    > things up if there is not a firm way of going with this one.
    >
    > Thanks for any information and advice
    >
    > Simon
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    > "Simon McDonald" <simon@mcdonaldz11.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:OP7IY5BqFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I am running XP Pro SP2, and have it set up with a primary and extended
    >> partition. Unfortunately, these two partitions use up all the space on my
    >> (only) HDD, although the extended partition has a fair bit of free space
    > in it.
    >>
    >> Firstly, this arrangement of partitions came 'automatically' when I
    >> installed Windows (as far as I am aware anyway).
    >> Is this because when installing Windows, during the setup I asked it to
    >> establish a D and an E partition, as well as the system partition. Based
    > on my request, did it by default put D and E (as logical volumes) in an
    >> extended partition which consumed the remainder of the disc.
    >> If so, would it be better in future to just create the system partition
    >> at
    >> setup, and use Disk Management to create D and E as I see fit (maybe in
    >> an
    >> extended partition of my choice of size, or even as their own primary
    >> partitions)?
    >>
    >> Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size of
    > the extended partition (it has loads of free space)? I have looked around,
    > and
    >> people seem to suggest a third party tool of some sort (Partition Magic
    > for instance) - but there is always a 'sad' story to be found for each of
    > these!
    >> Is there a 'Windows' way to reduce the extended partition size? I suspect
    >> that I know the answer is no. If so, I might take the easy way out and
    > just buy an extra HDD, and plug it in! I do not really want to risk
    > messing
    >> things up if there is not a firm way of going with this one.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any information and advice
    >>
    >> Simon


    Anna wrote:
    > Simon:
    > As you suspect, there is no way for XP to non-destructively manipulate
    > your
    > established partitions at this point since your two partitions span the
    > entire disk space of the drive.
    >
    > You can, as you state, use Partition Magic, to manipulate the partitions
    > non-destructively. PM is a solid product and you should not fear using it
    > in
    > this circumstance. Naturally, like in all things involving the computer,
    > things can go wrong, so it is always prudent to back up critical and/or
    > important data before undertaking this process.
    > Anna


    "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
    news:%23at6aVKqFHA.3104@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > First, you assess the size of the partition needed for XP. Input that
    > during the XP install. Leave the remainder of the space alone. Any
    > further
    > partitioning should be done in XP, after XP is installed, because it
    > faster
    > and easier to visualize.
    >
    > PM, correct version of course, in my opinion, should not be used in XP.
    > Only from the boot CD. Any mods to a nonboot partition should be
    > preceded by removing ownership of that partition. Then, taking ownership
    > again after the mod. Just my opinion. Most PM problems originate when
    > either combining partitions, or doing too many mods on too many parittions
    > in one session. At least, that seems to be the pattern.


    le_temp_de says...
    Hi, All!
    Personally I prefer Acronis Disk Director
    [http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/diskdirector]. I'm
    really experienced user, to my opinion it's the best partition manager.
    Some time ago I used PM, but it always made boring errors, also I've
    read some bad reviews about this software.
    Anyway, it's only my choice, and I'd like to recommend you to try.
    I must say that Disk Director cheaper than other partition softwares,
    but it doesn't worse, even better. I've never seen such convenient
    intuitive wizard, which doesn't allow you make any change by accident.


    Simon:
    My experience using various versions of Partition Magic over the years has
    been quite different from the apparent negative experiences of the above
    posters. I've used the present version of PM8 with various XP configurations
    100 or more times, chiefly to manipulate partitions. I've found the program
    virtually flawless in doing so. Whatever (few) problems have arisen were due
    to problems with the OS, having nothing to do with PM, or (more likely) user
    error in using PM. As you may know, PM is considered the "industry standard"
    when it comes to partition managers. I've no experience with the Acronis
    program mentioned above.

    I reiterate that if you decide to use PM or similar program, before doing so
    back up any important or critical files. Any of us who have worked on
    computers for any time know that "**** happens".
    Anna
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Anna,

    Thanks for the confirmation and the info.

    Simon


    "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    news:ObmpthCqFHA.564@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "Simon McDonald" <simon@mcdonaldz11.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:OP7IY5BqFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I am running XP Pro SP2, and have it set up with a primary and extended
    >> partition. Unfortunately, these two partitions use up all the space on my
    >> (only) HDD, although the extended partition has a fair bit of free space
    >> in it.
    >>
    >> Firstly, this arrangement of partitions came 'automatically' when I
    >> installed Windows (as far as I am aware anyway).
    >> Is this because when installing Windows, during the setup I asked it to
    >> establish a D and an E partition, as well as the system partition. Based
    >> on my request, did it by default put D and E (as logical volumes) in an
    >> extended partition which consumed the remainder of the disc.
    >> If so, would it be better in future to just create the system partition
    >> at setup, and use Disk Management to create D and E as I see fit (maybe
    >> in an extended partition of my choice of size, or even as their own
    >> primary partitions)?
    >>
    >> Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size of
    >> the extended partition (it has loads of free space)? I have looked
    >> around, and people seem to suggest a third party tool of some sort
    >> (Partition Magic for instance) - but there is always a 'sad' story to be
    >> found for each of these! Is there a 'Windows' way to reduce the extended
    >> partition size? I suspect that I know the answer is no. If so, I might
    >> take the easy way out and just buy an extra HDD, and plug it in! I do not
    >> really want to risk messing things up if there is not a firm way of going
    >> with this one.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any information and advice
    >>
    >> Simon
    >
    >
    > Simon:
    > As you suspect, there is no way for XP to non-destructively manipulate
    > your established partitions at this point since your two partitions span
    > the entire disk space of the drive.
    >
    > You can, as you state, use Partition Magic, to manipulate the partitions
    > non-destructively. PM is a solid product and you should not fear using it
    > in this circumstance. Naturally, like in all things involving the
    > computer, things can go wrong, so it is always prudent to back up critical
    > and/or important data before undertaking this process.
    > Anna
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Gordon,

    I hesitate to say on this newsgroup, but I want to have a play with Linux!!!

    Thanks

    Simon

    "Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
    news:u4pPeACqFHA.3804@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Simon McDonald wrote:
    >
    >> Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size
    >> of the extended partition
    >
    > What are you intending to do with the free space on the HDD (not to be
    > confused with the free space within the partition) that you create?
    >
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    news:OLm65wLqFHA.3192@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >
    > > "Simon McDonald" <simon@mcdonaldz11.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
    > > news:OP7IY5BqFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > >> Hi,
    > >>
    > >> I am running XP Pro SP2, and have it set up with a primary and extended
    > >> partition. Unfortunately, these two partitions use up all the space on
    my
    > >> (only) HDD, although the extended partition has a fair bit of free
    space
    > > in it.
    > >>
    > >> Firstly, this arrangement of partitions came 'automatically' when I
    > >> installed Windows (as far as I am aware anyway).
    > >> Is this because when installing Windows, during the setup I asked it to
    > >> establish a D and an E partition, as well as the system partition.
    Based
    > > on my request, did it by default put D and E (as logical volumes) in an
    > >> extended partition which consumed the remainder of the disc.
    > >> If so, would it be better in future to just create the system partition
    > >> at
    > >> setup, and use Disk Management to create D and E as I see fit (maybe in
    > >> an
    > >> extended partition of my choice of size, or even as their own primary
    > >> partitions)?
    > >>
    > >> Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size of
    > > the extended partition (it has loads of free space)? I have looked
    around,
    > > and
    > >> people seem to suggest a third party tool of some sort (Partition Magic
    > > for instance) - but there is always a 'sad' story to be found for each
    of
    > > these!
    > >> Is there a 'Windows' way to reduce the extended partition size? I
    suspect
    > >> that I know the answer is no. If so, I might take the easy way out and
    > > just buy an extra HDD, and plug it in! I do not really want to risk
    > > messing
    > >> things up if there is not a firm way of going with this one.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks for any information and advice
    > >>
    > >> Simon
    >
    >
    > Anna wrote:
    > > Simon:
    > > As you suspect, there is no way for XP to non-destructively manipulate
    > > your
    > > established partitions at this point since your two partitions span the
    > > entire disk space of the drive.
    > >
    > > You can, as you state, use Partition Magic, to manipulate the partitions
    > > non-destructively. PM is a solid product and you should not fear using
    it
    > > in
    > > this circumstance. Naturally, like in all things involving the computer,
    > > things can go wrong, so it is always prudent to back up critical and/or
    > > important data before undertaking this process.
    > > Anna
    >
    >
    > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
    > news:%23at6aVKqFHA.3104@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > > First, you assess the size of the partition needed for XP. Input that
    > > during the XP install. Leave the remainder of the space alone. Any
    > > further
    > > partitioning should be done in XP, after XP is installed, because it
    > > faster
    > > and easier to visualize.
    > >
    > > PM, correct version of course, in my opinion, should not be used in XP.
    > > Only from the boot CD. Any mods to a nonboot partition should be
    > > preceded by removing ownership of that partition. Then, taking
    ownership
    > > again after the mod. Just my opinion. Most PM problems originate when
    > > either combining partitions, or doing too many mods on too many
    parittions
    > > in one session. At least, that seems to be the pattern.
    >
    >
    > le_temp_de says...
    > Hi, All!
    > Personally I prefer Acronis Disk Director
    > [http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/diskdirector]. I'm
    > really experienced user, to my opinion it's the best partition manager.
    > Some time ago I used PM, but it always made boring errors, also I've
    > read some bad reviews about this software.
    > Anyway, it's only my choice, and I'd like to recommend you to try.
    > I must say that Disk Director cheaper than other partition softwares,
    > but it doesn't worse, even better. I've never seen such convenient
    > intuitive wizard, which doesn't allow you make any change by accident.
    >
    >
    > Simon:
    > My experience using various versions of Partition Magic over the years has
    > been quite different from the apparent negative experiences of the above
    > posters. I've used the present version of PM8 with various XP
    configurations
    > 100 or more times, chiefly to manipulate partitions. I've found the
    program
    > virtually flawless in doing so. Whatever (few) problems have arisen were
    due
    > to problems with the OS, having nothing to do with PM, or (more likely)
    user
    > error in using PM. As you may know, PM is considered the "industry
    standard"
    > when it comes to partition managers. I've no experience with the Acronis
    > program mentioned above.
    >
    > I reiterate that if you decide to use PM or similar program, before doing
    so
    > back up any important or critical files. Any of us who have worked on
    > computers for any time know that "**** happens".
    > Anna
    >
    >

    Since I installed XP in NTFS format, and I had only PM 5.0 at the time,
    chose NOT to use any updated version of PM. Rather my 3rd party boot
    manager, system commander, comes with a partitioning program that seems
    compatible with XP's version of NTFS and standard FAT32. Has similar assets
    of PM.

    My comments on PM are based on my observations of complaints here and other
    newsgroups.
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "Simon McDonald" <simon@mcdonaldz11.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:ea3$OSQqFHA.2588@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl
    > Gordon,
    >
    > I hesitate to say on this newsgroup, but I want to have a play with
    > Linux!!!
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Simon

    Nothing wrong with that! May I suggest that before you muck around with
    partitions you try one or more of the distros that will run entirely from
    the CD?

    Knoppix is usually the favourite,
    http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html

    Mepis
    http://www.mepis.org/

    Kubuntu
    http://kubuntu.org/

    are also good. These will run directly off the CD without installing
    anything on your HDD. A bit slower than a HDD install, but still good enough
    to give you a flavour of Linux

    Good luck!
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Cheers Gordon,

    I have come across a couple of CD runnable versions (Suse and Linspire). I
    will now have a look at your suggestions.

    Thanks again for the friendly inf.

    Simon

    "Gordon" wrote:

    > "Simon McDonald" <simon@mcdonaldz11.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:ea3$OSQqFHA.2588@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl
    > > Gordon,
    > >
    > > I hesitate to say on this newsgroup, but I want to have a play with
    > > Linux!!!
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > > Simon
    >
    > Nothing wrong with that! May I suggest that before you muck around with
    > partitions you try one or more of the distros that will run entirely from
    > the CD?
    >
    > Knoppix is usually the favourite,
    > http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html
    >
    > Mepis
    > http://www.mepis.org/
    >
    > Kubuntu
    > http://kubuntu.org/
    >
    > are also good. These will run directly off the CD without installing
    > anything on your HDD. A bit slower than a HDD install, but still good enough
    > to give you a flavour of Linux
    >
    > Good luck!
    >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Anna,

    Thanks again. Good to here of the positive usage. I'll give it a look.

    Thanks again

    Simon

    "Anna" wrote:

    >
    > > "Simon McDonald" <simon@mcdonaldz11.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
    > > news:OP7IY5BqFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > >> Hi,
    > >>
    > >> I am running XP Pro SP2, and have it set up with a primary and extended
    > >> partition. Unfortunately, these two partitions use up all the space on my
    > >> (only) HDD, although the extended partition has a fair bit of free space
    > > in it.
    > >>
    > >> Firstly, this arrangement of partitions came 'automatically' when I
    > >> installed Windows (as far as I am aware anyway).
    > >> Is this because when installing Windows, during the setup I asked it to
    > >> establish a D and an E partition, as well as the system partition. Based
    > > on my request, did it by default put D and E (as logical volumes) in an
    > >> extended partition which consumed the remainder of the disc.
    > >> If so, would it be better in future to just create the system partition
    > >> at
    > >> setup, and use Disk Management to create D and E as I see fit (maybe in
    > >> an
    > >> extended partition of my choice of size, or even as their own primary
    > >> partitions)?
    > >>
    > >> Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size of
    > > the extended partition (it has loads of free space)? I have looked around,
    > > and
    > >> people seem to suggest a third party tool of some sort (Partition Magic
    > > for instance) - but there is always a 'sad' story to be found for each of
    > > these!
    > >> Is there a 'Windows' way to reduce the extended partition size? I suspect
    > >> that I know the answer is no. If so, I might take the easy way out and
    > > just buy an extra HDD, and plug it in! I do not really want to risk
    > > messing
    > >> things up if there is not a firm way of going with this one.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks for any information and advice
    > >>
    > >> Simon
    >
    >
    > Anna wrote:
    > > Simon:
    > > As you suspect, there is no way for XP to non-destructively manipulate
    > > your
    > > established partitions at this point since your two partitions span the
    > > entire disk space of the drive.
    > >
    > > You can, as you state, use Partition Magic, to manipulate the partitions
    > > non-destructively. PM is a solid product and you should not fear using it
    > > in
    > > this circumstance. Naturally, like in all things involving the computer,
    > > things can go wrong, so it is always prudent to back up critical and/or
    > > important data before undertaking this process.
    > > Anna
    >
    >
    > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
    > news:%23at6aVKqFHA.3104@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > > First, you assess the size of the partition needed for XP. Input that
    > > during the XP install. Leave the remainder of the space alone. Any
    > > further
    > > partitioning should be done in XP, after XP is installed, because it
    > > faster
    > > and easier to visualize.
    > >
    > > PM, correct version of course, in my opinion, should not be used in XP.
    > > Only from the boot CD. Any mods to a nonboot partition should be
    > > preceded by removing ownership of that partition. Then, taking ownership
    > > again after the mod. Just my opinion. Most PM problems originate when
    > > either combining partitions, or doing too many mods on too many parittions
    > > in one session. At least, that seems to be the pattern.
    >
    >
    > le_temp_de says...
    > Hi, All!
    > Personally I prefer Acronis Disk Director
    > [http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/diskdirector]. I'm
    > really experienced user, to my opinion it's the best partition manager.
    > Some time ago I used PM, but it always made boring errors, also I've
    > read some bad reviews about this software.
    > Anyway, it's only my choice, and I'd like to recommend you to try.
    > I must say that Disk Director cheaper than other partition softwares,
    > but it doesn't worse, even better. I've never seen such convenient
    > intuitive wizard, which doesn't allow you make any change by accident.
    >
    >
    > Simon:
    > My experience using various versions of Partition Magic over the years has
    > been quite different from the apparent negative experiences of the above
    > posters. I've used the present version of PM8 with various XP configurations
    > 100 or more times, chiefly to manipulate partitions. I've found the program
    > virtually flawless in doing so. Whatever (few) problems have arisen were due
    > to problems with the OS, having nothing to do with PM, or (more likely) user
    > error in using PM. As you may know, PM is considered the "industry standard"
    > when it comes to partition managers. I've no experience with the Acronis
    > program mentioned above.
    >
    > I reiterate that if you decide to use PM or similar program, before doing so
    > back up any important or critical files. Any of us who have worked on
    > computers for any time know that "**** happens".
    > Anna
    >
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Thanks to all for the helpful advice and information.

    Simon

    "Simon McDonald" wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I am running XP Pro SP2, and have it set up with a primary and extended
    > partition. Unfortunately, these two partitions use up all the space on my
    > (only) HDD, although the extended partition has a fair bit of free space in
    > it.
    >
    > Firstly, this arrangement of partitions came 'automatically' when I
    > installed Windows (as far as I am aware anyway).
    > Is this because when installing Windows, during the setup I asked it to
    > establish a D and an E partition, as well as the system partition. Based on
    > my request, did it by default put D and E (as logical volumes) in an
    > extended partition which consumed the remainder of the disc.
    > If so, would it be better in future to just create the system partition at
    > setup, and use Disk Management to create D and E as I see fit (maybe in an
    > extended partition of my choice of size, or even as their own primary
    > partitions)?
    >
    > Secondly, what's done is done, so, is there a way to reduce the size of the
    > extended partition (it has loads of free space)? I have looked around, and
    > people seem to suggest a third party tool of some sort (Partition Magic for
    > instance) - but there is always a 'sad' story to be found for each of these!
    > Is there a 'Windows' way to reduce the extended partition size? I suspect
    > that I know the answer is no. If so, I might take the easy way out and just
    > buy an extra HDD, and plug it in! I do not really want to risk messing
    > things up if there is not a firm way of going with this one.
    >
    > Thanks for any information and advice
    >
    > Simon
    >
    >
    >
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