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How to Open Samsung SyncMaster 931BF

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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July 15, 2010 2:29:48 PM

Here's the deal. I have had this monitor for years and LOVE it. If I could find a suitable replacement, I'd consider replacing it since it seems like it's going downhill. But the 2ms response time = big money now-a-days from what I've seen. So, I really just want to fix my screen myself.

The problem is that I can't get the shell open. I have taken it to Best Buy (where I bought it years ago) and the people there couldn't get it open. I have the actual repair manual that technicians use, and unfortunately, it is for two models and the one shown isn't my model...grrrr
The manual says that after I take out all the screens, I just "lift off" the case. The problem is, there is something holding it on the sides. It won't just lift off. Does anyone know if there is a catch somewhere or something that has to be moved a certain way or something? I even called Samsung and they couldn't figure it out!!!

BTW, my problem is that the screen turns on, then goes black immediately. But if I power cycle the screen several times, it comes on and stays on, but the problem is getting worse so I want to go ahead and fix it. I've read that this is most likely caused by some bad capacitors, which are easy to replace for a friend of mine that has done that kind of thing for 20 years. We just can't get the dang screen open! I was also told it could be the backlight or the power supply, but those seemed unlikely since it would turn on and stay on eventually (indicating that one of the capacitors was having trouble holding a charge).

THANKS!
And if anyone has any suggestions for a comparable screen replacement, I'm all ears.
Anonymous
July 16, 2010 2:13:11 AM

Yup, the little blighters often use internal clips. The only solution I've found is to examine the join between the two components very closely looking for a slot you could fit a screwdriver blade in. Then push with the blade and the clip should release.

On one monitor there was no clue and the solution was to slide a penknife blade into the join and just move it along the join until it hit a clip and released it. Of course the case suffered a little.

Well worth the effort, though. Swapping the capacitors has saved three monitors recently and it's so easy when the faulty ones show bulging or leakage (though it's cheap enough to replace all of them).

The cause is heat -- the capacitors aren't rated for the high temps in the restricted space in a monitor. On one monitor the mumetal casing around the power board was getting hot to the touch so I cut the plastic monitor case and mounted a roughly 3.5 inch x 4.5 inch heatsink on the metal. The heatsink reaches 36 degrees Centigrade in a room temp of 26 degrees.
July 16, 2010 2:41:42 PM

Thanks for the info. I'll definitely see if I can find any clips holding it in place. Most likely, I'm gonna have to just break something b/c we tried slowly sliding a screwdriver down the side to no avail.
!