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base Vcore can vary?

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August 15, 2003 10:47:12 AM

I read once that CPUs of the exact same type can come with different core voltages and that it affects overclocking. Where can I find the original Vcore of my 2.4c? I haven't messed with it yet and at the BIOS it says that currently, the voltage is 1.525, but when I run Winbond Hardware Doctor (the software that came with my Abit IS7-E) it says 1.46-1.49. What is my CPU specified Vcore? What is the range of voltages that P4 2.4c can get?

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August 15, 2003 1:38:08 PM

The default Vcore for the 2.4c should be 1.525, and IMO the BIOS is probably right.

It´s true that some CPU´s have a lower Vcore, I had a 1.3GHz Duron once with a Vcore around 1.40. I could run it without a fan, just a heatsink. It would run at around 45°C under load, pretty cool!!!

I´d recommend good case-fans though if you´re ever thinking of running an AMD higher than K6-2 without a CPU-fan, I just had to try with my Duron. I don´t really remember how far it would overclock, but I was pretty impressed, since it was a Duron. It really gives you more headroom, having a low voltage CPU, but your overclock is only as good as the weakest link, and memory is often the reason your system won´t overclock much!

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August 15, 2003 2:11:26 PM

More voltage can help with overclocking, as the higher frequencies require greater signal strength to work properly.

The amount by which you'd need to increase it depends on the chip.

However, raising the VCore on a chip is a great way of increasing it's heat output too, and running a chip at above it's default will shorten the life of the chip.

On the whole it's safe to go up by ~.1V on most chips, but on a P4 you shouldn't need to go above 1.7V (in fact I read somewhere that 1.75V and above can kill some P4s really quickly).



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August 16, 2003 12:14:20 AM

It's specified at 1.525v, either your line voltage is a little lower than specified, or the motherboard is providing a voltage lower than specified.

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August 16, 2003 1:32:48 AM

its actually hardware monitoring...MBM5 says my vcore for my pIII is 1.63-1.68...i checked the voltage from the mobo's voltage regualtors...it is spot on 1.65 and was not fluctuating one bit...


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August 16, 2003 1:41:41 AM

Motherboards can do a fairly good job of keeping the voltage within a tight range, much better than most power supplies. But you can have 2 causes: Either the board's VRM is just a little off, or the line voltage from the power supply can be a bit low, to cause a CPU vCore to be consistantly slightly low.

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