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New name for presscot.

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August 19, 2003 12:03:28 PM

Hey, i got myself a new name for Intel's upcoming processor: PRESSHOT! it's really hot. :evil: 

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<font color=blue>
My computer is <b>sooo fast</b>,
It finished <b>SETI</b> in <b>10 seconds.</b>
<font color=blue>

More about : presscot

August 19, 2003 1:37:32 PM

sounds like a winner

PRESSHOTT the first cpu to crunch code while it fries up bacon n eggs

I mean if FAIR is FAIR... all the clowns who complained about BURNING ATHLONS...should stand up and be pissed over THE PRESSHOT .... the first one should be AMDMELTDOWN
August 19, 2003 2:00:05 PM

well, frying bacon and eggs is with your CPU is better than making an omelette on the hood of your car on hot day!

I had a much better usertitle but was caught trying to hack me a better one so I got my current title as a punishment
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August 19, 2003 2:02:39 PM

been working on that one all day?
August 19, 2003 3:52:45 PM

There's a difference between a CPU producing a lot of heat, and a CPU which dissipates up to 70 W and lacks any thermal protection. AFAIK the Prescott will still have thermal protection that is just about foolproof.

As for those who say the HSF will never fall off, it does. Over at PCmech several people have posted about their new Athlon systems frying themselves for various reasons. One had been given a TBird computer from his friend, drove it home, turned it on, and the CPU burned out because the heatsink had fallen off during the drive. Another bought a shiny new 2500+, only to have it roast because the heatsink wasn't quite flat. Maybe enthusiasts are better at putting on heatsinks, and maybe enthusiasts know to check a computer after moving it around, but not everyone is an enthusiast.

When a non-overclocked Prescott spontaneously combusts, THEN people should "stand up and be pissed".
August 20, 2003 2:51:13 AM

NA still staying with the ole one. Scotty.
August 20, 2003 7:36:36 AM

:evil: 

<font color=blue>
My computer is <b>sooo fast</b>,
It finished <b>SETI</b> in <b>10 seconds.</b>
<font color=blue>
August 20, 2003 9:07:20 AM

Thats true... to a point.
But thermal energy (heat) still has to go somewhere... and 100W is 100W.
And when a fan fails or its run in extreme conditions (Texas summer with no aircon) that means its that much closer to glitchy + crashy territory.

That means bigger louder more complex heatsinks and inevitably better case cooling.


<b>My Car comes with Hyper Threading enabled:
1970 General Motors Holden HT Kingswood Wagon :smile:
Regards,
Mr no integrity coward.</b>
August 20, 2003 3:48:09 PM

<<<PRESSHOTT the first cpu to crunch code while it fries up bacon n eggs

I mean if FAIR is FAIR... all the clowns who complained about BURNING ATHLONS...should stand up and be pissed over THE PRESSHOT .... the first one should be AMDMELTDOWN>>>

yeah moron the difference is that prescott has thermal protection so it can't burn up you jackass. so it is hot but you can count on intel to provide and quality hs/f solution and protection against AMDMELTDOWN.
August 20, 2003 4:11:52 PM

Quote:
Thats true... to a point.
But thermal energy (heat) still has to go somewhere... and 100W is 100W.
And when a fan fails or its run in extreme conditions (Texas summer with no aircon) that means its that much closer to glitchy + crashy territory.

Except that it still isn't going into glitchy/crashy territory because it's still a P4. So the worst that it does slow itself down. (And thus keep itself from getting glitchy/crashy.)

<pre><b><font color=red>*** BattleTech - The Crescent Hawks Inception ***</b>
Pilot twenty-ton behemoth robots to save your planet from a
Kuritian invasion force. Now available on the C=64!</font color=red></pre><p>
August 20, 2003 4:20:57 PM

CPU-wise.. but all that excess heat must go somewhere - if it goes into heating up other stuff on the mobo, then <i>that</i> could throw you into glitchy/crashy territory. Granted good case cooling should prevent this, but I'm sure something that hot sitting on a mobo isn't going to help much.

---
The end is nigh.. (For this post at least) :smile:
August 20, 2003 6:07:24 PM

I have a feeling that the way things are going, we are going to see water cases coming with the new system. That way they are staying cooler and quiter.

<font color=blue>"You know, that my backstab attack does double the damage. I can make an off button for him." </font color=blue> :cool:
August 20, 2003 6:16:29 PM

Quote:
CPU-wise.. but all that excess heat must go somewhere - if it goes into heating up other stuff on the mobo, then that could throw you into glitchy/crashy territory. Granted good case cooling should prevent this, but I'm sure something that hot sitting on a mobo isn't going to help much.

Step 1: Ambient temps rise.
Step 2: Processor heats up.
Step 3: Processor slows itself down <i>so that it produces less heat</i>.

Where at this point is there any 'excess heat'?

<pre><b><font color=red>*** BattleTech - The Crescent Hawks Inception ***</b>
Pilot twenty-ton behemoth robots to save your planet from a
Kuritian invasion force. Now available on the C=64!</font color=red></pre><p>
August 20, 2003 7:07:26 PM

step 4. Athlon 64 blows past the trottled PRESHOTT
step 5. Intel folds
August 20, 2003 7:33:21 PM

You are right when saying that the proc is not going to burn up because is a P4 but I don't think that's exactly the point. If I pay for 3.6GHz then I want 3.6GHz, not the processor slowing down just to make it through the day! Anyway, if a newer rev of Prescott comes out in 2004 which will solve all of these problems, than it will become no.1 in my list for upgrading sometime in mid 2004. But the way I see things now, supposing that all these issues regarding Prescott are true, A64 is my first choice.
August 20, 2003 7:34:27 PM

Quote:
step 4. Athlon 64 blows past the trottled PRESHOTT
step 5. Intel folds

You never give up, do you? I can't decide if that's a good quality or a bad one... :\ It probably wouldn't be so bad if you just weren't so ... intellectually impaired.

<pre><b><font color=red>*** BattleTech - The Crescent Hawks Inception ***</b>
Pilot twenty-ton behemoth robots to save your planet from a
Kuritian invasion force. Now available on the C=64!</font color=red></pre><p>
August 20, 2003 8:50:46 PM

Step 5: Intel improves its heatsink designs and increases case cooling.
Step 6: The unthrottled Prescott competes with the A64.
Step 7: Intel fixes the heat problems, so the improved heatsinks and extra case cooling is no longer needed.

Suggesting Intel will fold is just laughable. They only have, what, 75+% market share? Even when Athlon was beating up the PIII and early P4's, Intel did not even come close to folding.

Suggesting that Prescott will be throttled during normal operation is also laughable. Throttling starts at around <b>70C</b>. The new CPU's will not be running that hot if the people assembling the systems know what they are doing.

IIRC there was a similar throttling conspiracy theory thread when P4 was new, something like "1500 MHz except when you need it". It was incorrect then, and the same assumption is incorrect now.
August 20, 2003 9:43:17 PM

i was joking

not all my intel jabs are with malice.
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August 20, 2003 10:07:18 PM

The way I see it you dont want to buy the first revision of the Prescott anyways.Maybe its just me but it looks to much like the first Willamette...All this is of course speculation but from what I read the first prescott doesnt seam to be optimised(heat dissipation wise).
The Willamette, was much slower clock for clock than a PIII cuz of the longer Pipeline but on the other hand Intel made this pipeline to reach higher frequencies much faster. Im sure everyone will agree it was a good strategy and that it paid pretty well(AMD had to come up with PR rating cuz they where to far behind and n00bs would go for the GHZ...)So when Intel came up with Higher FSB and higher frequency the long Pipeline didnt matter anymore cuz of the huge bandwith available...
While Prescott problem is quite different I wouldnt be suprised to see Intel bouncing back with a new revision(new pin package etc) that will make up for most of the first revision problem.
Anyway bottom line is that probly only unaware customer will run to buy the P5(?) when it jsut got realease cuz ITS A P5!!!(BTW I rember laughin at people telling me yooo! I just bought a PIV 1.4ghz!!!)
Buying brand new technologies isnt usually the smartest thing you can do...
August 21, 2003 2:23:30 AM

I'm with you. I'm noting going to buy the first Scotty. I can wait. Plus with Tejas due 2nd half of 2004.
August 21, 2003 12:55:42 PM

Quote:
Where at this point is there any 'excess heat'?

At what point does it start Throttling? IIRC it's somewhere above 70C. I can't Recall seeing <i>anyone</i> have a P4 CPU temperature around there. So even <i>before</i> the throttling kicks in, you've still got a P4 system which is 20C above the current norm anyway.

Plus of course, you could end up with cycle like...
1)Gets hot
2)throttles down
3)Gets Cooler
4)Throttles Back up
5)Gets hot...
6)etc.

I'm sure constant fluctuations in temperature like this would not be healthy (lifespan-wise) for some components.

As a feature which stops your Expensive Chip blowing up when the HS falls off, I think thermal throttling is a <i>great</i> idea, but I don't think it should be relied upon to keep temperatures down because the HSF can't cope - that's a bit too much of a cop-out...

It's a moot point anyway, as I'm sure Intel will have all the problems sorted out on release of the chip, and I'm equally sure that the solution will not involve Watercooling.


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The end is nigh.. (For this post at least) :smile:
August 21, 2003 2:02:37 PM

A burned XP 2500+ ? What motherboard did he use?

My system: Intel Pentium 4 3.0, 800FSB / TwinMOS 1Gb DDR400 / MSI 875P Neo / Sapphire Radeon 9800Pro / Antec TruePower 550W / 2x Western Digital Raptor / Hercules G.T XP /
SamsungDVD / Lite-On CDRW
August 21, 2003 3:31:00 PM

Quote:
Plus of course, you could end up with cycle like...
1)Gets hot
2)throttles down
3)Gets Cooler
4)Throttles Back up
5)Gets hot...
6)etc.

I'm sure constant fluctuations in temperature like this would not be healthy (lifespan-wise) for some components.

That is not a real physical possibility. Unless throttling is a discrete-state variable - so it's either on or off (which it isn't) - then there is no way the temperature is going to oscillate that much.

But hey, this is indeed a moot point. I think it is unlikely that Scotty will not run in excess of 65C - we'll see about that...

Anyway, popegoldx, you really, <i>really</i> don't give up now, do you? You just get a good feeling when saying or typing "Intel folds", huh? Take it easy... You should be more moderate about Scotty, because we still now very little about it - just as A64 is also a wild card...

:evil:  <font color=red><b>M</b></font color=red>ephistopheles
August 21, 2003 4:37:17 PM

Quote:
At what point does it start Throttling? IIRC it's somewhere above 70C. I can't Recall seeing anyone have a P4 CPU temperature around there. So even before the throttling kicks in, you've still got a P4 system which is 20C above the current norm anyway.

Yeah, but this is just the CPU's temperature in the die. The ambient case temps, even with a CPU this hot, are no where near that high.

Quote:
Plus of course, you could end up with cycle like...
1)Gets hot
2)throttles down
3)Gets Cooler
4)Throttles Back up
5)Gets hot...
6)etc.

I'm sure constant fluctuations in temperature like this would not be healthy (lifespan-wise) for some components.

Except that it doesn't work that way. It isn't an on/off thing. It's an adjustable amount of cycles spend doing nothing. This keeps the temps stable.

Quote:
As a feature which stops your Expensive Chip blowing up when the HS falls off, I think thermal throttling is a great idea, but I don't think it should be relied upon to keep temperatures down because the HSF can't cope - that's a bit too much of a cop-out...

I agree. I'm just saying that even in the absolute worst case scenario, it's still not really a problem other than you'd be running an uber-expensive processor at lower speeds than you paid for.

But even then, that's the <i>worst</i> case. Intel has already gotten case manus to validate their cases for 3+ GHz CPUs. (Or in other words prove that their cases have a good enough airflow to run a darn hot CPU without causing any problems with other components.) So anyone who actually does a modicum of research and configures their PC correctly won't have any problems with the excessive thermal output of a first-production Scotty anyway.

Quote:
It's a moot point anyway, as I'm sure Intel will have all the problems sorted out on release of the chip, and I'm equally sure that the solution will not involve Watercooling.

All of the problems? Even I'm not betting on that one. I still think that Intel will release a ScottyB shortly afterwords (maybe they'll even wait and combine it with the socket change) that'll run considerably cooler. And the first Scotty just may indeed be a heat monger. But hey, that's life.

I do agree that it definately won't use watercooling for the retail cooler. Intel will just use an even better retail cooler is all. And what with cases already being validated for 3+ GHz, Intel will just say not to use it in a case without proven good airflow. I mean really, only a clue would use it in anything less anyway. You wouldn't even run a 3.2GHz NWC in a case with bad airflow.

<pre><b><font color=red>*** BattleTech - The Crescent Hawks Inception ***</b>
Pilot twenty-ton behemoth robots to save your planet from a
Kuritian invasion force. Now available on the C=64!</font color=red></pre><p>
August 21, 2003 5:23:19 PM

Quote:
Except that it doesn't work that way. It isn't an on/off thing. It's an adjustable amount of cycles spend doing nothing. This keeps the temps stable.

Stable at what though? If it keeps it stable @69C, that's still pretty warm.. I'll concede the point though :smile: ...

Quote:
So anyone who actually does a modicum of research and configures their PC correctly won't have any problems with the excessive thermal output of a first-production Scotty anyway.

That's a given - I'm just thinking of ppl who don't research... Hell, who cares :evil:  - we get enough people around here who try to build a modern rig around a case with no airflow, with a 300W poor quality PSU....

Quote:
I still think that Intel will release a ScottyB shortly afterwords

I'm pretty sure about that too. I might even buy one, but only if I can overclock the pins off it :evil:  .
If ScottyA is going to be so warm, I guess it won't be too easy to OC - that's why I'll wait and see..


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The end is nigh.. (For this post at least) :smile:
!