Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

3,200.000 VS 5,000,0000 contrast ratio.

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
April 14, 2012 11:01:12 PM

Hello,I need a little help on buying a Samsung TV, some of the specs on both TVs are;
LED, 1080p,120Hz, full-LED backlighting, the only difference is, one has a 3,200,000 and the other one has 5,000,000 contrast ratio, the one with 3,200 is $70.00 less....Should i pay an extra $70 for a higher contrast? Is the difference between 3,200 and 5,000 that noticeable?
April 15, 2012 2:21:48 AM

This topic has been moved from the section Opinions and Experiences to section Home Theatre by Pyree
a b x TV
April 19, 2012 7:50:39 PM

OSKY88 said:
Hello,I need a little help on buying a Samsung TV, some of the specs on both TVs are;
LED, 1080p,120Hz, full-LED backlighting, the only difference is, one has a 3,200,000 and the other one has 5,000,000 contrast ratio, the one with 3,200 is $70.00 less....Should i pay an extra $70 for a higher contrast? Is the difference between 3,200 and 5,000 that noticeable?



Those numbers are 99% bogus anyways. Check out a review by home theatermag.com, or another specialist site to get a real idea of the contrast. manufacturers LOVE to throw out bogus numbers, to catch your eye. The real issue with contrast ratio, is there is no standard measurement. Manufacturers can easily artifically inflate numbers by jacking brighness settings up to nuclear levels, just so they can claim a higher number. Most LCD televisions have about 1000-1200 ansi regulated contrast ratio. LED backlit versions will improve dramatically in situations of local backlight dimming vs edge light (on a perfectly black screen, a local dimming LED set could hit up to 10,000, but that in no way is sustainable. Your extreme high end such as the sharp elite lines can produce over 2000. Reputable reviewers will do a full battery of contrast tests using real world content, and test patterns that simulate real world viewing situations.

I would assume you are looking at the 5000 series vs the 6000 series. Both models are an edge lit LED backlighting system. The only real difference is the 5000 series is 120HZ and the 6000 series is 240.

http://reviews.cnet.com/tv-buying-guide/specs-to-ignore...

TLDR: Those contrast ratios are bogus, Check out review sites such as home theater for accurate information. Unless you get the set calibrated, you'll never see the difference.
Related resources
April 19, 2012 8:26:36 PM

jcoultas98

Thanks for your reply, it was very good info you sent me, i had already made up my mind 99% on getting the 5050 since i did not here from anyone on this subject but with your info it's now 100% +.

Thanks again,
OSKY88
September 24, 2012 2:50:55 PM

Quote:
I would assume you are looking at the 5000 series vs the 6000 series. Both models are an edge lit LED backlighting system. The only real difference is the 5000 series is 120HZ and the 6000 series is 240.


Actually, the 5000 series is 60 Hz and the 6000 series is 120 Hz. Another example of manufacturers (Samsung at least) being misleading in their advertising. The "120" and "240" numbers they display on their boxes is the "Clear Motion Rate" (CMR) number for the TV (the higher the number the better). I was fooled into thinking the 120 printed on the UN46EH5300 TV I just bought meant 120 Hz when in fact it is a 60 Hz television. I noticed a significant amount of motion blur when watching a football game the day after I purchased it, which prompted me to do some investigating. The TV I replaced (also a Samsung) is about three years old, but doesn't produce any motion blur because it is a 120 Hz TV. I'll be returning the 5300 series TV tomorrow and awaiting the arrival of my actual 120 Hz TV (6000 series with CMR of 240), which by the way I found for $30 cheaper on Amazon.com. The 6000 isn't a Smart TV like the 5300 (which is why it is a bit cheaper), but my Samsung Blu Ray player has all the Smart functionality (streaming apps, etc.) that I need and I cannot live with the motion blur so I had to upgrade.
a b x TV
September 24, 2012 4:25:34 PM

The Input refresh is 60Hz, their interpolated Refresh is 120Hz/240Hz on both sets. The Fake CMR rate is different. The only sets that feature a true 120Hz input mode are 3D sets (with few exceptions peppered around). The other problem? There are no input sources that use 120Hz outputs, except 3D sources, and a PC. No matter how you cut it, the input is 60Hz. TV sources are a max of 60Hz. If you saw motion blur on a set, it is because of weak processing, slow panel, or your set was incorrectly set up.

http://www.samsung.com/us/video/tvs/UN50EH5000FXZA

http://www.samsung.com/us/video/tvs/UN60ES6150FXZA-spec...

September 24, 2012 4:30:53 PM

jcoultas98 said:
The Input refresh is 60Hz, their interpolated Refresh is 120Hz/240Hz on both sets. The Fake CMR rate is different. The only sets that feature a true 120Hz input mode are 3D sets (with few exceptions peppered around). The other problem? There are no input sources that use 120Hz outputs, except 3D sources, and a PC. No matter how you cut it, the input is 60Hz. TV sources are a max of 60Hz. If you saw motion blur on a set, it is because of weak processing, slow panel, or your set was incorrectly set up.

http://www.samsung.com/us/video/tvs/UN50EH5000FXZA

http://www.samsung.com/us/video/tvs/UN60ES6150FXZA-spec...


Ok. I believe you. All I know is that I bought a 5300 series 60 Hz TV (advertised as such) with a "120" on the box and the 6000 series is advertised as 120 Hz and has a "240" on the box. My other Samsung has never had motion blur and it was advertised as 120 Hz, whereas this new one has blur. The old one is a 40" and the new one is 46" so perhaps that has something to do with it too. I also noticed last night that there was significant blur when watching one football game (on USA), but no blur when watching a different game on a different channel (NBC). So it appears that the broadcast effects the blur as well. Do you have any input as to the cause of this?
a b x TV
September 24, 2012 4:37:44 PM

Major networks use extremely expensive Encoding Systems/Cameras/Networks to deliver the absolute best signal possible. If you see a game broadcast on CBS, NBC, ABC, FOX, they will be absolutely gorgeous. USA has nowhere near the budget on gear that the big 4 has. It also depends on your signal providor (Cable, Dish, etc).
September 24, 2012 4:44:56 PM

Ok, that makes sense. But I'm still a bit confused--I understand both TVs take a 60 Hz input, but are you saying the UN46EH5300 has a 120 Hz screen refresh rate and the UN46EH6000 has a 240 Hz refresh rate? Because they are not advertised as such:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-ali...
September 28, 2012 2:32:55 AM

My Samsung UN46EH6000 LED TV (120 Hz refresh rate) came yesterday and I hooked it up. Compared to the 60 Hz UN46EH5300, I am happier with this set, but still not completely satisfied. I am trying to overlook the subtle amount of motion blur, but it is irritating me more and more as I watch. It's not just on certain channels, its all channels, and the standard definition channels look even worse than before because I went from a 40" LCD to a 46" LCD. Perhaps I should back down to a 42". Not sure what I"m going to do at this point. I've experimented with all the Auto Motion Plus settings and the blur is still there. My 40" Samsung (UN40B640) didn't have any blur whatsoever, and it was also 120 Hz with auto motion plus, so I'm thinking it has to be because the new TV is so much larger. The maximum viewing distance is only about 13 feet and 40" was sufficient--the new TV was kind of an impulse buy. I may just return it altogether and reconnect the old one. Any advice?
!