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Windows licence with Dell

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Anonymous
May 7, 2004 2:33:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

What kind of licencing of Windows OS (XP Home Edition or XP Pro etc)
comes with Dell desktops? I am a linux user, and don't know much about
this. But a friend of mine want to know. Specifically, does he get the
rights to the Windows OS that came with the Dell desktop if he buys the
desktop from somebody? The guy also wants to set up his home networking
(that is where I come in actually). Does XP Home edition have all the
necessary features so as to use the desktop to connect to high speed
internet and let other internal home computers connect to the internet
through that (in other words, to use it as a router)?

Thanks,
->HS
--
(Remove all underscores,if any, from my email address to get the correct
one. Apologies for the inconvenience but this is to reduce spam.)

More about : windows licence dell

Anonymous
May 7, 2004 2:47:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"H. S." <g_reate_xcalibur@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:E2zmc.6345$Ee6.4056@charlie.risq.qc.ca...
>
> What kind of licencing of Windows OS (XP Home Edition or XP Pro etc)
> comes with Dell desktops?

XP Home is standard; Pro is an option


I am a linux user, and don't know much about
> this. But a friend of mine want to know. Specifically, does he get the
> rights to the Windows OS that came with the Dell desktop if he buys the
> desktop from somebody?

The license for the OS is supposed to remain with the machine -- HOWEVER, it
depends on the terms of sale - it is possible to buy a Dell system with no
operating system if you're a corporate client covered by a site license from
Microsoft, so the answer is, it depends - check with the seller.

The guy also wants to set up his home networking
> (that is where I come in actually). Does XP Home edition have all the
> necessary features so as to use the desktop to connect to high speed
> internet and let other internal home computers connect to the internet
> through that (in other words, to use it as a router)?

Yes, it does.
XP Home allows five simultaneous connections -- Pro allows for 10, if that's
an issue.
Anonymous
May 7, 2004 3:21:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Edward J. Neth wrote:


>
> The license for the OS is supposed to remain with the machine -- HOWEVER, it
> depends on the terms of sale - it is possible to buy a Dell system with no
> operating system if you're a corporate client covered by a site license from
> Microsoft, so the answer is, it depends - check with the seller.

The seller is a student who had bought the desktop with WinXP Home
Edition last year. Along with the desktop came a WinXP CD (navy blue in
color IIRC) with some licence that has OEM in it or something. Pardon my
ignorance, I am currently in my university and can't call my pal to know
what the CD says exactly. But I do remember something on the WinXP Home
Edition CD saying "to be sold with a Dell computer only" or some words
to that effect. I have also suggested him to call Dell and ask for
transfering the ownership (just in case).


> The guy also wants to set up his home networking
>
>>(that is where I come in actually). Does XP Home edition have all the
>>necessary features so as to use the desktop to connect to high speed
>>internet and let other internal home computers connect to the internet
>>through that (in other words, to use it as a router)?
>
>
> Yes, it does.
> XP Home allows five simultaneous connections -- Pro allows for 10, if that's
> an issue.

If that is case, 5 is plently for him :) 

Thanks for the information.
regards,
->HS


--
(Remove all underscores,if any, from my email address to get the correct
one. Apologies for the inconvenience but this is to reduce spam.)
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Anonymous
May 7, 2004 5:10:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"H. S." <g_reate_xcalibur@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Edward J. Neth wrote:

>> The license for the OS is supposed to remain with the machine -- HOWEVER, it
>> depends on the terms of sale - it is possible to buy a Dell system with no
>> operating system if you're a corporate client covered by a site license from
>> Microsoft, so the answer is, it depends - check with the seller.

>The seller is a student who had bought the desktop with WinXP Home
>Edition last year. Along with the desktop came a WinXP CD (navy blue in
>color IIRC) with some licence that has OEM in it or something. Pardon my
>ignorance, I am currently in my university and can't call my pal to know
>what the CD says exactly. But I do remember something on the WinXP Home
>Edition CD saying "to be sold with a Dell computer only" or some words
>to that effect. I have also suggested him to call Dell and ask for
>transfering the ownership (just in case).

OEM is a term common in manufacturing. Dell buys stuff from the
maker [at OEM discounts], incorporates it into their computers,
and sells them to customers. The WinXP supplied is subject to
the terms of Dells OEM agreement with MS, in this case, it is
that the copy of WinXP belongs to the computer, and should stay
with it.

And yes, your friend should make sure that the original owner
works with him to get the transfer of ownership "registered" with
Dell. It can avoid problems down the line.

>>> The guy also wants to set up his home networking
>>>(that is where I come in actually). Does XP Home edition have all the
>>>necessary features so as to use the desktop to connect to high speed
>>>internet and let other internal home computers connect to the internet
>>>through that (in other words, to use it as a router)?

>> Yes, it does.
>> XP Home allows five simultaneous connections -- Pro allows for 10, if that's
>> an issue.

>If that is case, 5 is plently for him :) 

Until you said college student, my first was going to be to get a
Cable/DSL router from Linksys, SMC, etc. Good ones for home
networks are going for ~$60-$70 or so [last time I looked] at
places like outpost.com, etc. Simplifies life considerably, I've
found. But if the budget is tight, Windows XP does have built-in
internet connection sharing, and using that and a few NIC cards,
he could probably set up a small network for less than the price
of the Cable/DSL router. http://praticallynetworked.com is a
good resource for home networkers.


>
>Thanks for the information.
>regards,
>->HS

--
OJ III
[Email sent to Yahoo address is burned before reading.
Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
Anonymous
May 7, 2004 5:48:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

As far as Microsoft is concerned, there is no need to transfer
anything.
Normally OEM is permanently tied to the original computer and can not
be transferred regardless the condition of the original computer.

Read the EULA for details:
Start/Run
Type "winver" ENTER
Click "End-User..."

--
Jupiter Jones
http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


"H. S." <g_reate_xcalibur@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:mMzmc.6347$Ee6.5933@charlie.risq.qc.ca...
> Edward J. Neth wrote:
>
>
> >
> > The license for the OS is supposed to remain with the machine --
HOWEVER, it
> > depends on the terms of sale - it is possible to buy a Dell system
with no
> > operating system if you're a corporate client covered by a site
license from
> > Microsoft, so the answer is, it depends - check with the seller.
>
> The seller is a student who had bought the desktop with WinXP Home
> Edition last year. Along with the desktop came a WinXP CD (navy blue
in
> color IIRC) with some licence that has OEM in it or something.
Pardon my
> ignorance, I am currently in my university and can't call my pal to
know
> what the CD says exactly. But I do remember something on the WinXP
Home
> Edition CD saying "to be sold with a Dell computer only" or some
words
> to that effect. I have also suggested him to call Dell and ask for
> transfering the ownership (just in case).
>
>
> > The guy also wants to set up his home networking
> >
> >>(that is where I come in actually). Does XP Home edition have all
the
> >>necessary features so as to use the desktop to connect to high
speed
> >>internet and let other internal home computers connect to the
internet
> >>through that (in other words, to use it as a router)?
> >
> >
> > Yes, it does.
> > XP Home allows five simultaneous connections -- Pro allows for 10,
if that's
> > an issue.
>
> If that is case, 5 is plently for him :) 
>
> Thanks for the information.
> regards,
> ->HS
>
>
> --
> (Remove all underscores,if any, from my email address to get the
correct
> one. Apologies for the inconvenience but this is to reduce spam.)
Anonymous
May 7, 2004 6:31:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Thanks a ton for the useful information. I will keep that router thing
in mind though.

regards,
sincerely,
->HS

--
(Please remove all underscores from my email address to get the correct
one. Apologies for the inconvenience, but this is to reduce spam.)
!