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PC crashes (and restarts) randomly

Last response: in Windows 7
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November 8, 2012 4:44:38 PM

Hello,
First of all thanks for the awesome community and site!

I just came back after a few days out, and for some reason my PC cashed several times today.
So my PC will restart (more like crash) after I log-in, it is random, it can crash in a few seconds or a few minutes.

Last time I used my PC, the "5,6,7" keyboard buttons didn't work (Logitech G15), maybe that could help.
( I usually shutdown my PC every time I go to sleep or go out).

I know that the computer crashes because, when I boot I get a screen telling me windows did not shut down correctly and I can use windows normally or with safe mode.

PC specs:
Windows 7 32 bit
nVidia 260 GTX
4 g"b ddr2 ram
Intel E8500 Duo 3.16 GHz
Antivirus:
Avast free + malwarebytes free

I've tried to find solutions for the problem and even:
- Tried to open case, and tighten cables.
- Cool the system down by opening it and leaving it to rest
But I had no luck yet, so I came here.

Help would be highly appreciated :) 
a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2012 5:11:34 PM

Hi, If you have a spare power supply or can borrow one, connect it and test.
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November 8, 2012 5:16:11 PM

alexoiu said:
Hi, If you have a spare power supply or can borrow one, connect it and test.


How do I move it (without breaking anything)? and what should I check before?
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a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2012 5:19:41 PM

Acording to your spec's you have an old computer and it's not surprising that your starting to have problems as you know things don't last forever.
My guess is that the power supply is starting to go (you didn't list it ) and with the other older parts in your computer you will have to make a decision to be replacing parts or upgrade. As you may know that once you start replacing parts it can be an endless string of changing components as they fail. It may be a long process and the remaining parts may even last a while longer but eventually it's going to be replacing the different parts.
So the choice is yours of course and without knowing more my guess at this point is the power supply. You can pick up a decent one for around $50 new.
In the mean time have you upated all drivers and Windows updates ?
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a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2012 5:19:59 PM

How do you move the power supply? What's the motherboard or the PC model? You disconnect the power cables and connect the other ones. You don't have to install it in the case if you just test. I would firstly try a different power supply.
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November 8, 2012 5:34:05 PM

inzone said:
Acording to your spec's you have an old computer and it's not surprising that your starting to have problems as you know things don't last forever.
My guess is that the power supply is starting to go (you didn't list it ) and with the other older parts in your computer you will have to make a decision to be replacing parts or upgrade. As you may know that once you start replacing parts it can be an endless string of changing components as they fail. It may be a long process and the remaining parts may even last a while longer but eventually it's going to be replacing the different parts.
So the choice is yours of course and without knowing more my guess at this point is the power supply. You can pick up a decent one for around $50 new.
In the mean time have you upated all drivers and Windows updates ?


Yes, I've updated all of my drivers.
And I've checked for viruses.

By the way, could the problem originate from the power-outlet being connected to a power "separator"?
And where can I get all of my system specs from? (like power supply and motherboard)
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a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2012 5:37:03 PM

Can you explain what this power seperator is and what you mean by the term as your using it ?
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a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2012 5:59:46 PM

Ok , a power strip is a prefered thing to b using with a computer as a means of protection from power surges. So an actual power srtip surge protector would be better. So no we're back to the power supply possibly being defective or failing.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2012 6:06:32 PM

Check your motherboard for bulging or leaking capacitors. Google "bad capacitors" for lots of images of what they look like. This may have happened inside your PSU as well, but would be harder to spot; unless you are a skilled electronics technician, do NOT open the cover of your PSU as there are potentially lethal voltages in there, even after it has been turned off.
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November 8, 2012 6:09:56 PM

I guess i'll take my PC to the technical support store near my house, thanks anyways.
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November 8, 2012 6:25:22 PM

If you are not confident to try fixing it by yourself, the best thing to do is to ask the technical support store near your house.

Ask him to test your system with one of his power supplies.

If the problem is the power supply, then you need to get another one -- your system needs 500W with 6-pin x2 supplementary power connectors.

For your reference something like CORSAIR Builder Series CX500 500W http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2012 9:44:05 PM

No, not the Corsair Builder V2. The original Builder was made by Seasonic, and was good. The V2 and later ones are built by CWT. Dissection has shown that they use inferior Samxon capacitors from a line known to experience early failure. Links provided on request. They'll review well (and have), but may not hold up. Since I would not buy one myself, I cannot ethically recommend that someone else buy one. The Antec VP series or FSP Raider series, if available where you are, are nice, budget selections. The VP is not 80+ certified, but only because it lacks active PFC (it has a little voltage switch, which usually, but not in this case, means to avoid it), but it is efficient enough for 80+.
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April 29, 2013 6:42:10 PM

This is an old post, but I'm having a very similar problem to the guy above. I took my PC to a great shop where they stress tested the hell out of it for 2 days and couldn't get the thing to crash (CPU/GPU/Hard drive/power supply/memory). I bring the computer home today, and it crashes in the first five minutes of having it on. Trying to nail down all the common denominators, I realized it's been plugged into the same fancy power strip all this time, even when the computer moved rooms. I have it plugged into the wall now, and it hasn't crashed. So I'm pretty sure it's actually the power strip that's at fault here, nothing to do with the computer. The guy above probably figured things out by now, but I'm just sharing in case it's useful for some soul out there experiencing inexplicable random crashes and restarts!
Cheers!


agam360 said:
Hello,
First of all thanks for the awesome community and site!

I just came back after a few days out, and for some reason my PC cashed several times today.
So my PC will restart (more like crash) after I log-in, it is random, it can crash in a few seconds or a few minutes.

Last time I used my PC, the "5,6,7" keyboard buttons didn't work (Logitech G15), maybe that could help.
( I usually shutdown my PC every time I go to sleep or go out).

I know that the computer crashes because, when I boot I get a screen telling me windows did not shut down correctly and I can use windows normally or with safe mode.

PC specs:
Windows 7 32 bit
nVidia 260 GTX
4 g"b ddr2 ram
Intel E8500 Duo 3.16 GHz
Antivirus:
Avast free + malwarebytes free

I've tried to find solutions for the problem and even:
- Tried to open case, and tighten cables.
- Cool the system down by opening it and leaving it to rest
But I had no luck yet, so I came here.

Help would be highly appreciated :) 


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!