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Nostalgia...AMD K6-2 question

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  • CPUs
  • Heatsinks
  • Fan
  • AMD
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September 4, 2003 2:11:02 PM

Does anyone remember if the AMD k6-2 500 cpu can work without a fan and heat sink. I believe I read that some time ago. Problem...I shipped a beginner computer to a senior citizen friend of mine, who lives in Florida. It had a AMD k6-2 500mhz cpu, clocked at 550mhz, along with an attach fan and heatsink installed. During the shipping the fan/heatsink plastic mounting catches broke off and the fan/heatsink can no longer be attached. My senior friend is currently trying to straighten out the cpu pins (which I don't know if he will be able to)and if he does...I am going to instruct him to clean the cpu and reseat the cpu without the fan/heatsink. He will be overclocked to 550mhz and I don't think that I will be able to instruct him how to clock down the cpu. Again, can this overclocked cpu work without the fan/heatsink on a 503+ fic mainboard?

Also,...for the record... if the cpu pins are to damaged...I located a vendor from where I can ship a new one to him...but he will still be without fan/heatsink.

More about : nostalgia amd question

September 4, 2003 2:14:56 PM

No way. They were hot little suckers, you'll definitely need some form of cooling for that CPU.

:eek:  My CPU runs so hot it creates a quark-gluon plasma :eek: 
September 4, 2003 3:36:51 PM

I appreciate your input...and I guess we will have to install with a fan and heatsink. I asked him about the plastic cpu mounting latches being intact...he told me he saw two on opposite side of the cpu mounting base (on the mobo). If this is so, and along with the picture I see in the fic va 503+ manual,...it appears that the fan/heatsink mounting brackets are intact. I don't believe I am seeing the traditional 3 mounting brackets (found on current mobos) in the picture in the fic 503+ manual. What I am seeing appears to be two brackets each on opposite sides (as well as opposite diagonally) of the cpu mounting base. Can anyone confirm that this is correct. If this is so...he may be able to reseat the fan/heatsink; correctly.
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September 4, 2003 3:57:01 PM

Just get some thermal epoxy and permanently attach the heatsink to the CPU. Problem solved! :o 

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September 4, 2003 4:04:18 PM

EXCELLENT!!!! Never though of it!!! Where can one purchase thermal epoxy? Can it be found in radio shack or an electronics store? Also, what are the chances of him straightening out the pins? He has been working on it...and is used to doing microscopic work under a magnifying glass. Is it a waste of time... or should I just order the new cpu and ship it to him.
September 4, 2003 6:01:18 PM

I would say anywhere you can get Arctic Silver? I know Arctic makes it. I've heard of people using it. Sorry to be so vague.

I did find it <A HREF="http://www.newegg.com/app/viewproduct.asp?DEPA=1&submit..." target="_new"> here </A>though. 3rd. one down on the page.

Hope that helps.

Well, I didn't think that was gonna happen!!!
September 4, 2003 6:26:33 PM

Make sure you will be able to operate the lever of the ZIF socket before you epoxy the heatsink to the CPU. Otherwise you won't be able to take the CPU out or even worse, you won't be able to install it.

There is some play in the holes of the socket so your friend might be able to straighten the pins adequately. Though, if they are badly bent they will probably snap off.

<b>56K, slow and steady does not win the race on internet!</b>
September 4, 2003 6:40:03 PM

Thanks, I checked out your link. Seems we won't need it...thank goodness, the mounting brackets are intact! I had(have) this senior citizen, computer newbie, in the case...checking for damage and loose connections (long-distance over the phone). I am proud to say that this man who doesn't even know how to completely control a mouse yet...has identified and checked out all inside components and connections, reconnected the reset wire (for the front of the case) and is in the process of attempting to straighten out the cpu pins. He will reinstall the cpu (whether this one or new) and fan, and then proceed to his first boot... I just wanted to share this. I guess no one should under-estimate what our seniors are capable of. This guy is 78 yrs old, computer illiterate, but possibly our new competition...lol. Thank you and everyone again for your help!

<font color=red> "A PC in every room...conserves heating oil". </font color=red> :wink:
September 4, 2003 7:19:39 PM

Hey man that's great. Good story. I believe the old guy will get it. If not he'll know how to build a computer before he fires it up. Pretty neat thing really.

Well, I didn't think that was gonna happen!!!
September 4, 2003 8:24:21 PM

most all socket 370/A heatsinks will fit a socket 7's mounting brackets...


Proud owner of DOS 3.3 :smile:
a b à CPUs
September 5, 2003 2:55:41 AM

I use JB-Weld for attaching heatsinks, it's a decent quality conductor, good enough for attaching RAM sinks and GPU sinks, so it's better than a CPU actually requires. But it has to be applied very thinly, and squeezed to remove all exess. It's available in most auto parts stores, Wal-Mart, etc. It's an iron powder filled epoxy.

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<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
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September 5, 2003 2:58:16 AM

JB-Weld is so good that the added expense and time to order AS epoxy is usually unjustified. I've used it on video cards, chipsets, CPU's, etc. As well as engine blocks!

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
September 5, 2003 4:16:17 AM

good stuff...used it to fix a cracked radiator...it lasted a year!

Not to sure about its thermal properties but it should be decent...as it is basically metal and epoxy...


Proud owner of DOS 3.3 :smile:
September 5, 2003 7:31:10 AM

Never thought about JB Weld, but your right. I've used JB Weld in many ways. You can tap the stuff after it's set up. It will hold torque as well. Amazing stuff really. Should of thought about it though.

I've got a friend of mine that used regular bearing grease to mount his P3. He didn't have any Arctic Silver when his chip came in & he wanted to get it in. So he went out in the garage & grabbed a finger full of bearing grease. The CPU ran at least 2 years. Ran that way until he got his P4. LOL

Well, I didn't think that was gonna happen!!!
a b à CPUs
September 5, 2003 8:14:35 AM

Automotive wheel bearing grease often has insulating fibers. Standard general purpose grease, aka bearing grease, as used in other applications (such as for your tie rod ends, bicycle bearings, etc) is great for this. It's around $3 a tub, a tub can do at least 1000 processors, it's metal based and has a high melting point so it won't run, I even use it on my P4 2.4B!

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
September 5, 2003 3:43:35 PM

You never cease to amaze me Crashman...I've been looking high and low trying to find that thermal adhesive tape that my ram sinks were attached with (they fell off). No longer!!! I'm going to use JB weld...thanks for the tip!!!

Also a coward...pass the nachos
September 5, 2003 3:45:34 PM

Quote:
I just wanted to share this. I guess no one should under-estimate what our seniors are capable of. This guy is 78 yrs old, computer illiterate, but possibly our new competition...lol. Thank you and everyone again for your help!

We'll probably see him on here next week asking "How do I voltage mod my K6-2" Well...maybe not, but congrats on walking him through the process. Doing things over the phone can be frustrating, and doubly so when the other person has limited knowledge. Hope everything goes well...

Also a coward...pass the nachos
September 5, 2003 4:19:38 PM

I laughed at the guy & told him he was going to burn the thing up. Well had the last laugh. It didn't burn up & he used it that way for at least 2 years.

Well, I didn't think that was gonna happen!!!
a b à CPUs
September 5, 2003 8:06:16 PM

Yes, just excercise normal precautions:

1) The stuff is very thick, and only a good conductor of heat, so make sure you spread it very thin

2) Use as much pressure as you can, short of breaking things, to squeeze the air pockets out.

3) It's easy to make a mess with the stuff. Don't.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
September 5, 2003 8:16:33 PM

Thanks again...don't worry though, I'm an expert user of JB Weld. YOu see, I own a Volkswagen...its almost as essential as gasoline

Also a coward...pass the nachos
September 5, 2003 8:36:20 PM

lmao...epoxy is better than JB weld for radiators (epoxy is less brittle and withstands expansion with heat better)...just wanted to put that out there if anyone is into half ass radiator repair...


Proud owner of DOS 3.3 :smile:
September 5, 2003 8:37:40 PM

No radiators on a volkswagen dude...they weren't into water cooling....hmmm, I wonder if I could modify a peltier to cool my bug?

Also a coward...pass the nachos
a b à CPUs
September 5, 2003 10:32:15 PM

Solder is best for repairing radiators.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
September 5, 2003 11:04:28 PM

As in pipe solder? Hmm...

But it was the top that was cracked...not one of the copper pipes...


Proud owner of DOS 3.3 :smile:
a b à CPUs
September 6, 2003 12:06:54 AM

You mean the top of the tank? Tanks can be made of copper, brass, aluminum, plastic. Solder is good for copper or brass. Solder, as in a combination of tin and lead (sometimes silver is used in the electronics industry as well).

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
September 6, 2003 4:48:19 AM

yes the top...near the overflow valve...actually right near its neck...it was aluminum i beleive


Proud owner of DOS 3.3 :smile:
a b à CPUs
September 6, 2003 7:01:18 AM

You weld Aluminium.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
September 6, 2003 12:51:33 PM

I can weld aluminum, as a matter of fact. I can weld it with Heliarc & Wire Feed. Started out welding 6" aluminum I beams that were cut a 45 deg.s for road signs in Indiana. It welds almost as easy as steel except for 1 thing. You can't see the heat in aluminum when your running your puddle & crater. Can't see what's liquid / molten in the crater. If you don't have the right heat & speed set for the gun, all of a sudden it will drip, thus leaving a hole that you need to fill back up.

Did some ship welding in New Port News VA as well. Now that was welding. 6" plate with a bevel cut in it 3 or 4 decks down in the ship. You have bottled gas with burners going underneath the seam your welding so the weld doesn't end up brittle. Set there on a 5 gal. bucket running a bead, clean it & run another to the top of the plate. Do about 8 to 10 inches in a 8 hour shift & use better than 50 lbs. of rod. After your finished for the day the inspectors come on & x-ray the weld you put in. If it's bad they grinding it out & you get to weld the same place the next day. Couldn't take that job though. to hot, to far down in the bowels of the ship & no air it seemed to me.

Well, I didn't think that was gonna happen!!!
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September 6, 2003 5:35:11 PM

I've never done TIG. I can MIG aluminum, but I'd need practice with TIG. I'm really good at gas welding other metals so TIG should be hard to learn.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
September 7, 2003 1:13:58 PM

It's not that hard to do. You'll get it with some practice. The biggest thing I can tell you is watch the puddle & crater like a hawk. Keep your tip moving a constant speed. That's about all there is to it. Oh & get a finer adjustment on the welder for heat & speed of the wire.

Darn aluminum is expensive to practice on. When I started they had such a big contract on those road signs so I did it for several months. Had I had to get my own aluminum to practice on, I would have never been able to learn.

Well, I didn't think that was gonna happen!!!
a b à CPUs
September 7, 2003 8:39:02 PM

Buy aluminum scrap by the pound for whatever your scrapyard pays, and sell it for the same amount. The only large expense is the wire (MIG) or rod (TIG).

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
September 8, 2003 8:52:47 AM

Update: Wow thread grew...lots of good info. Will take it in later. Wanted to say that my senior friend was successful with pin straightening. Took about half a day. The fan/heatsink brackets were intact. He called me back to report and already had the cpu, fan/heatsink installed! I proceeded to walk him through his first boot. I was concerned because I had him hit the reset button on the monitor the first night. He didn't post/scan on the monitor. We thought it might have been the refurbed monitor. Also, he has a keyboard adapter that tended to be loose and I originally thought that this would be his only problem. Anyway, he plugged everything in and it came up disc(40) and no keyboard errors! He took a day to rest from it. He than called me back...ready for action. I walked him through reconnecting the floppy ribbon and again, checking that all connections were tight. We hung up and he called me back when he was ready to boot. He reported WIN 98 screen...SUCCESS! All that was left was to re-adjust the video drivers and monitor settings. I thought finding the drivers (the device adjustment) and explaining the monitor controls would be impossible. Didn't take as long as I expected. The worse part was that when he went to center the desktop in the screen...with the 4 arrows (in the video driver device setting)...he couldn't manage to make it move. It turned out that he was trying to drag the arrows instead of clicking on them. He still hasn't learned to master the mouse, yet. LOL...amazing! Anyway, I've installed puzzles and other simple games, along with shortcuts for other office applications on the desktop for mouse exercise. I also put his maintainence shortcuts on the desktop. I wrote him detailed instructions for navigation and when he advances a bit we'll connect to the net. I am so happy, even though we were far apart, we were able to get it working. My friend stays in good physical shape, is active and watches his diet. Still great to run around with. I wanted him to have the comp to help him avoid any possible old age dementia. We've been friends for 30+ years and I worry about anything happening to him. And finally, I must confess...as a younger woman...he got me started on and taught me mechanics. Oh! I thought Crashman's grease would be useful...he would only need it for one cpu...the rest will work as a skin emoillent..LOL!
Again ...thanks members (and "yes rcpilot" I find it's a good story too. I have been viewing my friends aging all wrong...he's been easier to work with than many of the younger folks I helped) He knows that I am posting his tech. ability at an online tech. site and enjoys the posts and replies (to those posts) that I relay to him. (Smile)...Ego intact!




<font color=red> "A PC in every room...conserves heating oil". </font color=red> :wink:
September 8, 2003 1:11:15 PM

Crashman, you have one thrifty mind. I wouldn't have thought of that myself, but your absolutely right. I've gotten some thrifty tips from you over my time here. You never cease to amaze me, that's for sure.

Well, I didn't think that was gonna happen!!!
September 8, 2003 1:22:09 PM

That's way cool for sure. I knew that he would get it going. Never count anybody out because of their age. He now knows more than probably 50% of people that own computers, maybe more. I'm sure using it will enhance his life.

I'm currently teaching my Mother that is 71 how to use a computer. She has had trouble with using the mouse also. She's getting over that a bit now. Now, I've got to take her to the next step. She has a computer embroidery machine. I'm teaching her how to download patterns off the web & then put them on a floppy to run in her sewing machine. She's getting on to it pretty well. The computer has enhanced her life, that's for sure.

Well, I didn't think that was gonna happen!!!
a b à CPUs
September 8, 2003 9:55:58 PM

One of my friends was a glassier, they produced a lot of aluminum scrap building custom frames. I'm sure people who didn't know a scrap producer could find one if they looked hard enough. And there's scrap buyers in most cities.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
September 13, 2003 5:05:13 AM

Sorry I havn't posted back sooner. Had some things to take care of and than started messing with REDHAT. I was glad to hear your mom is also learning. I will share that with my friend. I believe that mouse control will be the hardest part for both of them. A computer embroidery machine! Wow! Now there's an interesting project. Bet she learns fast. My guy likes fishing. I gave him that neat fish tank screensaver. He already learned how to use it and change the fish...without even looking at the instructions I sent for it. Anyway, it looks like they are both on their way. Wait till they see the folks they can meet online. I think that's one of the best things the computer gives them. Again, thanks for your help and thanks for adding your mom's story.

<font color=red> "A PC in every room...conserves heating oil". </font color=red> :wink:
September 13, 2003 5:24:24 AM

Grub...I apologize...when reading and replying I failed to reply and thank you for your jokes and support. But now that I think of it maybe I should sign him up for a membership and get him a honorary high membership rating...say "OLD HAND"...LOL. I think he's earned it. :wink:

<font color=red> "A PC in every room...conserves heating oil". </font color=red> :wink:
September 13, 2003 5:26:31 AM

Thank you also, Wing. You saved us a cpu and some bucks. :smile:


<font color=red> "A PC in every room...conserves heating oil". </font color=red> :wink:
!