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Wanting to use an audio switch but unsure of procedure

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July 8, 2011 2:04:04 PM

Basically, I have always had a 4.1 surround sound system connected to my TV's output via a 3.5mm jack that from the stereo system. What I am wanting to do now is provide my PC, which is located about 10 feet away, with the same surround sound so I can play video games on my TV, listen to music, etc. I connect the TV and Desktop via HDMI to carry the sound to the TV, then it comes out the 3.5mm output.

For the last few weeks I've just been taking the 3.5mm jack from the TV and plugging it into the Desktop, but that requires moving one speaker out of the proper zone, and just a hassle. I have seen switches for AV, and a couple 3.5mm inputs/outputs, but I am unsure how I need to go about this.

Does anyone have any suggestions for some kind of switch that has a constant audio output, and switchable inputs?
Something along these lines:

http://www.amazon.com/Manhattan-Speaker-Headset-Audio-S...

The problem with this one, I think, is that it is for a speaker and headset. Would there be a way to have both my 3.5mm inputs switchable, while keeping the speaker's 3.5mm as constant? Or maybe another device? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated :) 
July 9, 2011 3:23:58 AM

your television has seperate outputs for the front and rear speakers?
i dont see how you would be getting surround sound without it.

you said you have the HDMI going from the computer to the television.
if that has worked in the past, what is wrong now?
does the audio not go to the television when there isnt any video being sent to the television?
i could see that being a problem.

those a/b switches could be simply flipped around.. making the input the output.
which one you pick is up to you.

when you use the switch backwards..
you would have the television outputs on A or B .. the desktop output on the other one.. and keep the speakers connected to the 'input' of the A/B switcher.

obviously..
if you have one 3.5mm connection for the front speakers, and another 3.5mm connection for the rear speakers.. you are going to need two A/B selectors.


the only problem i can seem to come up with is something i have already mentioned here on the forums in the past.
if the A/B switch has outputs that are designed for a specific range of resistance, flipping it around might introduce a totally different resistance.
things dont sound very good when it is all connected, that means the A/B switch is causing problems.

inputs are like 10,000 - 20,000 ohms usually.
outputs are much lower.. like 100 - 500 ohms

maybe it proves easier to build your own switch.. or keep searching for one that can do input resistances just as good as output resistances.

if the metal is only good for one range of resistances, you would think the metal would be cheaper to buy.
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July 25, 2011 2:09:33 PM

Thanks so much for the input guys. Perhaps it'd be easier if I listed the setup I have, as I'm not very audio-savy (as if that were not apparent already...). Rather than BS it, I will post what I know, with any blurry areas made more apparent.

I have a Logitech X-530 5.1 surround sound system that connects the white and red connectors to an adapter that turns into a 1/8" 3.5mm output connector. I have this connected a 25ft extension that I switch between my TV (Sony Bravia KDL-40XBR4) and my PC. I connect it into the light green output. For the life of me I can't find a picture of the connections for my version of the EVGA X58 motherboard, but here's an example:



It is the right-most center audio channel connection.

I use the corresponding output on the TV, though I cannot find a picture of it immediately (I use the side connection, not the back).

I would end up needing to connect the two output connections to a switch which would have an output that connects to the 3.5mm connector from the stereo, unless I could use the white/red (L/R I assume) connectors for better performance. That is, unless I am misunderstanding how this works.



Quote:
your television has seperate outputs for the front and rear speakers?
i dont see how you would be getting surround sound without it.


I am using an adapter that changes it to a single 1/8" connection. I could try just using the L/R connections, but then I don't see how to connect it straight to the PC, especially since I need an extension cable to do so.

Quote:

you said you have the HDMI going from the computer to the television.
if that has worked in the past, what is wrong now?
does the audio not go to the television when there isnt any video being sent to the television?
i could see that being a problem.


This has puzzled me as well, but mostly likely due to my own regretted ignorance. I connect my HDMI from my computer to my TV occasionally, but when I do this, I cannot seem to use the TV's audio output connection for the stereo. Instead, I end up having to plug the stereo into the PC's audio. It does not make sense to me, since I know that HDMI carries audio as well video, and this works when I hook my 360 or PS3 to my TV via HDMI. When I use either of them, I can connect my stereo to the TV, and it outputs fine. So, why would one HDMI connection carry audio, but not another? Unless I have to disable the output of my motherboard's audio in order to use my GPU's HDMI output as a means to also output sound? Or perhaps it is due to it being a GPU, and not utilizing the onboard sound of my motherboard... another area that I am unsure of. Regardless, if I could find a way to utilize a switch, then either source would suffice, as long as I had the correct video on the correct display (My monitor vs my TV).
obviously..

Quote:


if you have one 3.5mm connection for the front speakers, and another 3.5mm connection for the rear speakers.. you are going to need two A/B selectors.



Could you be more specific on this point? I googled A/B selector, but am still unsure of how it would be implemented, or how it would require two A/B selectors. It is not easily clicking with me for some reason.

Quote:

the only problem i can seem to come up with is something i have already mentioned here on the forums in the past.
if the A/B switch has outputs that are designed for a specific range of resistance, flipping it around might introduce a totally different resistance.
things dont sound very good when it is all connected, that means the A/B switch is causing problems.

inputs are like 10,000 - 20,000 ohms usually.
outputs are much lower.. like 100 - 500 ohms

maybe it proves easier to build your own switch.. or keep searching for one that can do input resistances just as good as output resistances.

if the metal is only good for one range of resistances, you would think the metal would be cheaper to buy.


I have not obtained a switch yet, but am making sure I do the appropriate homework before I make any purchases. Thanks so much for your input!
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July 26, 2011 3:27:04 AM

you said the logitech system is 5.1

that means there are THREE 3.5mm connections needed.

red and white is standard for left/right.
it doesnt even begin to specify front or back.

there has been posts about a/b switches for this very thing.
if you use the giant search function on top of the page (look by the address bar, below it, in the middle of the page)

if you are at the forum website.. that search bar will let you search the forum.
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