What causes outdoor speaker distortion?

we have a brand new 7/11 Integra DTR-40.3 receiver. We are using 2 pair of existing outdoor speakers (Boston Acoustic Voyage) 2 year old speakers. We are having distortion in these speakers. Do we need to upgrade speakers? or other suggestions?
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More about what outdoor speaker distortion
  1. one needs to know the wattages that the outdoor speakers can handle, as well as what ohms the speakers are.

    compare that with the specifications of the receiver.
    if they are about the same..
    maybe try moving the receiver closer to the speaker and see if that makes any difference with the new speaker wire.

    maybe the wire length is too long and causing the receiver to distort.
    or
    maybe the signal at the speaker end of the cord is distorted from excessive distortion caused by the speaker cord.
    or
    maybe the wrong type of cord was used for the wiring of the speaker.

    you might be damaging your new receiver if there is something wrong.
    better to be safe than sorry.
  2. Quote:
    we have a brand new 7/11 Integra DTR-40.3 receiver. We are using 2 pair of existing outdoor speakers (Boston Acoustic Voyage) 2 year old speakers. We are having distortion in these speakers. Do we need to upgrade speakers? or other suggestions?


    Its likely not speakers. Distortion can occur from a billion things, even your environment. If your speakers are being overloaded with to much power, or if the woofers are torn, it can happen as well as many other things.
  3. if the speakers have some age and have been out in the elements for a while i would check to make sure the drivers are intact and the cases have no physical damage and also make sure nothing has tried to make a home in these speakers . some debris on a speaker cone while playing can make a bunch of noise and so can a damaged cabinet if nothing else is found to be wrong i would try testing the speakers with another receiver or even a short length of wire . if you find the wire to a problem go with a larger gauge
  4. a bigger gauge wire would be my first thought.
    but
    i would also try a smaller gauge wire.
  5. i wouldn't try a smaller gauge wire . there is absolutely no electronic penalty for over sized wire to connect a speaker to a amplifier. the larger gauge the better .
  6. says you or the industry?


    you dont try a smaller gauge wire.. you havent done the best you can .
  7. anwaypasible said:
    says you or the industry?


    you dont try a smaller gauge wire.. you havent done the best you can .


    Maybe I'm missing something, but how can a smaller gauge wire be better? Larger guage typically has more insulation from interference and has less loss of power of a longer distance...
  8. voltage runs on thin cords.
    amperage runs on thick cords.

    dont believe me and have a look at the circuit traces for reference.
    size is supposed to be a matter of heat before the wire melts and the windings unwind.

    to say a thicker cable can transfer very small voltages is magical.
    i am not the dyslexic person here.

    thick wires trim the treble.
    thin wires trim the bass.


    exactly how i cannot say because i dont make my own wire.
    but
    i do know the small voltages can get confused on their way to the end of the wire.
    things like accumulation or simply running into too much resistance are 'statement reasons'


    the more magic the cable industry puts into the speaker wire.. the thicker and thicker the wire has to be before the treble starts to get trimmed.
    but
    things like oscillation can occur within the wire because of the metal's properties.
    before a full oscillation occurs.. the soundwave is changed, and that is known as distortion.
    when the full oscillation doesnt occur, you would basically be sending a DC signal to the speaker .. or simply adding DC to the output.
    it sounds flat and dull, lacking volume.. yet heating up the voice coil just the same until you turn up the amplifier to try and raise the output level of the speaker and the voice coil blows.
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