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Has any home user been able to network 2 pc and access their HD's

Last response: in Windows 7
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November 9, 2012 4:09:19 PM

Has any home user been able to network 2 win 7 pc's and access their HD's.

If so. Pls do not reply yes. Rather tell me what steps to take to make it happen.

Pls dont ask what problems i have with this since it seems that the answers then center around those problems which does not resolve my issue.

What i have is a clean install of win 7 SP1 on both machines. Not changed any default settings.

So thats why i want a step by step "tutorial"(for lack of a better word). In others words how did u do it.

And if anyone know of a guide or a website where i can find this information that would also be welcome.

If this is regarded as a double post the pls forgive as i am very desperate to solve the problem.

Not using a router and the cable works fine between other pc's. But I do have a router and either way router or cable i was not successful. To link the two pc's.

PLS PLS Help

Thank u


CyberFoxZA
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November 9, 2012 5:36:18 PM

Don't bother with homegroup, sometimes it works, most of the time it doesn't.

On both machines, create an admin acct with same username and password. These machines have to be on same subnet, 192.168.x.x
Then use the UNC path to access the hdd on 1 or the other. Make sure you set NTFS permissions correctly so that you can view/delete/modify if needed.
Make sure firewall is modified to permit the connection. You can also just turn off the firewall completely to do away with firewall settings.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 9, 2012 6:09:27 PM

Hi :) 

You DO realise that 7 has help file as part of it, with a large section on networking and Homegroups...

All the best Brett :) 
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a b $ Windows 7
November 9, 2012 6:09:56 PM

squirrelonfire said:
Don't bother with homegroup, sometimes it works, most of the time it doesn't.

On both machines, create an admin acct with same username and password. These machines have to be on same subnet, 192.168.x.x
Then use the UNC path to access the hdd on 1 or the other. Make sure you set NTFS permissions correctly so that you can view/delete/modify if needed.
Make sure firewall is modified to permit the connection. You can also just turn off the firewall completely to do away with firewall settings.



Hi :) 

Please do NOT tell people to "do away" with their firewall...that's a VERY good way to get Trojans...

All the best Brett :) 
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November 9, 2012 6:15:59 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

Please do NOT tell people to "do away" with their firewall...that's a VERY good way to get Trojans...

All the best Brett :) 



why?its not like the windows firewall accually works the way it should.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 9, 2012 6:36:19 PM

ericlw said:
why?its not like the windows firewall accually works the way it should.


Hi :) 

You didnt mention WINDOWS firewall...you just said firewall.....

Although I agree that Windows Firewall is Chocolate teapot time, there are a lot of people who read this forum who could have taken your statement to mean ANY firewall...

All the best Brett :) 
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November 9, 2012 7:40:16 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

Please do NOT tell people to "do away" with their firewall...that's a VERY good way to get Trojans...

All the best Brett :) 


Hmm interesting, how does that work exactly?
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a b $ Windows 7
November 9, 2012 8:01:27 PM

tr2012 said:
Hmm interesting, how does that work exactly?


Hi :) 

If that's a serious question, just Google Trojans and Firewalls...

All the best Brett :) 
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November 9, 2012 8:10:17 PM

@CyberFox:

Let's take this a step at a time.

First, we need to make sure that the network between the two computers is working. If you connect their Ethernet ports directly using a standard Ethernet cable, it won't necessarily work unless both connectors support 1 Gbps (which indirectly means that they detect whether the cable is straight or crossover, and configure themselves accordingly). So the fact that the cable works for other computers doesn't necessarily mean it will for those two. Most newer hardware is 1 Gbps, but older hardware likely is not. If you plug both computers into "downlink" (as opposed to the single "uplink", which won't help you) ports on a router and use straight (and not crossover) Ethernet cables, you at least alleviate this problem. It will also enable you to test the network connectivity of each to the router - and in so doing, the ability of the network to support the connection from one to the other.

So: straight Ethernet cables from each to the router. Then, open a command line on each computer and type in "ipconfig /all" and then hit the Enter key. It will look something like this:
C:\users\your username>ipconfig /all

Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . etc.
Look for the lines that read "IPv4 Address" and "Default Gateway". The first is the IP address of that computer. The second is the IP address of your router. If you don't see those lines, then your network connections are not working. Try a full shutdown and start-up in case your network adapter cached a bad IP address.

Typically, the IP address will look something like 192.168.1.???, where ??? is a number between 2 and 254. Sometimes, the third number 1 will be different. Bu if you see 169.254.???.???, then your network adapter on your computer is not successfully connecting to your router and getting an IP address.

If you know how to administer the router, then you can then try launching a browser and going to the admin page of the router. This is typically something like this:

http://192.168.1.1

where you substitute the underlined text with the value that appeared next to the "Default Gateway" information outlined above. If you get to the router's login page on both computers, then they should at least be able to send packets to each other.

It is not worth proceeding until you have accomplished this first step, because you cannot know whether the cause is the network connection or a firewall or something else.

(more)
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November 9, 2012 8:20:34 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

If that's a serious question, just Google Trojans and Firewalls...

All the best Brett :) 


The reason I asked is I don't really see what relevance a firewall has with the transmission of a trojan, given that Trojans do not have any replication mechanism of their own, they need to be dropped by some other form of transmission, by a worm or via http, email attachment etc. If you get stung by a trojan via a drive-by download from a compromised website or some other infection vector a basic NAT/SPI firewall won't help you unless it has some AV scanning of its own, something like a Fortigate or AV enabled Juniper. Network worms on the other hand will get dropped.
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November 9, 2012 8:30:31 PM

ericlw said:
why?its not like the windows firewall accually works the way it should.


The firewall in Windows 7 is multi-zoned, that is to say that it has different policies for different network locations, the default policies on the Home(Private) zone are far more relaxed than those of the Public zone. If both firewalls are configured in the Home(Private) zone then common network traffic will be allowed unhindered, there of course may come a time when you may need to add policies to the home zone if you install something that communicates on some weird and wonderful port. You should of course not select this zone if you're connecting directly to the internet rather than through a NAT box.
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Best solution

November 9, 2012 8:31:18 PM

When Windows 7 detects a new network connection, it asks you what type of network it is. Since you are presumably using both of these computers at home and not connecting "directly" (without the use of a firewall and other protective devices) to the internet, AND you intend to share files between the two computers, you should choose the "Home" option, instead of the "business" or "public" options. Public is the most restrictive. And business is probably not right for you given the absence of a domain server.

Once you choose "home", Windows 7 automatically configures the firewall to allow certain ports, programs and protocols to pass through the firewall either inbound, outbound, or both. This will help you because it will make it easier for the two computers to "see" each other.

Next, go to Control Panel (in the Start Menu), and locate and click on "HomeGroup" (you may need to click on Network and Internet first). You can try to configure a homegroup if you like. You should also click the Change advanced sharing settings... link near the bottom. This will bring you to a page that shows "Home or Work" and "Public". Click the expander button (looks like a v inside a circle) on the right next to Home or Work (remember, you told Windows that this particular network connection was a Home connection; that associates to this). Make sure that Turn on network discovery, Turn on file and printer sharing, and Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can read and write files in the Public folders are selected in the radio buttons (circles to the left of the text should have blue dots in them. If not, click those circles)

If you had to modify any of those advanced sharing settings, then remember to click Save changes at the bottom of the page (scroll down if you don't see it). You may see a pop-up asking for permissions. Since you asked for this change, click "OK" or "Yes" or whatever tells Windows that the change is ok.

Now open up Explorer. If all is well, you should be able to see the names of your two computers when you click on the Network item in the list on the left. Select one of the computers, and you should see its Public folder.

If you've gotten this far, then you are nearly there. You may need to make changes to security to specify whether network connections have "read-only" or "read-write" access to the Public folder. Windows includes help about how to check security and privileges on shared folders, which you can read about by clicking F1 and typing in "shared folders" in the search text box at the top.

If you get kinda part-way, post back here and let us know what you see. We can probably guide you through the rest at that point. There are so many variables in this that there is no way to make a "step-by-step" guide, because at each step there exists the potential for questions that lead to branches in the resulting suggestions. You don't end up with a linear guide, but rather a decision tree that gets enormous by the time you're all done.

One other thing: SECURITY. Others have touched on this as well. Do NOT connect your computers directly to an internet connection (such as what comes out of the cable modem or DSL modem provided by your ISP. That's just asking for trouble. Use a router configured as a gateway, and at least a major portion of your risk will be averted. Any computer connected to the internet is at risk - even those behind firewalls, with security software installed. Know the risks and how to mitigate them before you do that.
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November 10, 2012 6:44:14 AM


First of all thnx people for all the replies.

SOLVED

To Teramedia ur answer is so comprehensive and covers basicaly everything. Thank u so much for taking the effort of typing such a lengthy reply - u r my hero. And therefore u get my best answer vote x1000 if i could.

Further more u'r reply should be made sticky since through all my searches on the internet i've noticed lots a people having similar problems and none of the answers solved their problems, all answers i found was more confusing and partial related to my problem - so again this is the best answer and to the point. Thank you.

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November 10, 2012 6:44:19 AM

Best answer selected by CyberFoxZA.
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