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INSTALLING XP - SHOULD I PARTITION?

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September 1, 2005 12:09:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Ok, finally installing XP Pro on new system box. Have a 200g SATA drive.
Setup is asking me if I want to partition. Should I partition? If so, what
size, etc?

Thanks in advance for all/any help.

--
DeeDee

More about : installing partition

September 1, 2005 12:09:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Put 20 gigs for the C drive where XP and all your programs will be loaded
and the rest for your D partition.

Alias

"DeeDee" <dlyle@writeme.com> wrote

> Ok, finally installing XP Pro on new system box. Have a 200g SATA drive.
> Setup is asking me if I want to partition. Should I partition? If so,
> what
> size, etc?
>
> Thanks in advance for all/any help.
>
> --
> DeeDee
>
>
September 1, 2005 12:09:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"DeeDee" <dlyle@writeme.com> wrote in message
news:uztaIQhrFHA.2996@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl
> Ok, finally installing XP Pro on new system box. Have a 200g SATA
> drive. Setup is asking me if I want to partition. Should I
> partition? If so, what size, etc?
>
> Thanks in advance for all/any help.

It can be a good idea to partition - one partition for the OS/Applications
and one for data. That way if you need to re-format and re-install your data
remains untouched. Depending on what you use on a daily basis, perhaps about
20GB for the OS/Applications and the rest for data?
Related resources
Anonymous
September 1, 2005 12:09:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hi,

Yes, you have to create at least one partition and format it for
installation. What size? That's up to you. You can use all the drive and
have one big C: if you like, or you can separate it into multiple smaller
volumes. I use the former for many client setups, as they don't want to have
to navigate to various drives for saving and installation and prefer to just
accept default placement. Personally, I use multiple volumes so that stored
information is not affected by formatting and (re)installing different OS's,
and can also be shared by such.

--
Best of Luck,

Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
Windows help - www.rickrogers.org

"DeeDee" <dlyle@writeme.com> wrote in message
news:uztaIQhrFHA.2996@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Ok, finally installing XP Pro on new system box. Have a 200g SATA drive.
> Setup is asking me if I want to partition. Should I partition? If so,
> what
> size, etc?
>
> Thanks in advance for all/any help.
>
> --
> DeeDee
>
>
Anonymous
September 1, 2005 12:09:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In article <uztaIQhrFHA.2996@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>, dlyle@writeme.com
says...
> Ok, finally installing XP Pro on new system box. Have a 200g SATA drive.
> Setup is asking me if I want to partition. Should I partition? If so, what
> size, etc?
>
> Thanks in advance for all/any help.

Do a simple partition for the OS (about 16 to 32GB) so that you can
install Windows and your applications that you forget to install on the
second partition, then do the rest of the drive as the remainder.

If you trash the OS you can still get your data - just don't use File
Encryption.

--

spam999free@rrohio.com
remove 999 in order to email me
September 1, 2005 12:09:56 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
news:#hqxwThrFHA.2072@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl
> Put 20 gigs for the C drive

Great minds think alike? :-)
Anonymous
September 1, 2005 12:09:56 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 06:32:06 -0400, "Rick \"Nutcase\" Rogers"
<rick@mvps.org> wrote:

>Yes, you have to create at least one partition and format it for
>installation. What size? That's up to you. You can use all the drive and
>have one big C: if you like, or you can separate it into multiple smaller
>volumes. I use the former for many client setups, as they don't want to have
>to navigate to various drives for saving and installation and prefer to just
>accept default placement. Personally, I use multiple volumes so that stored
>information is not affected by formatting and (re)installing different OS's,
>and can also be shared by such.

Other benefits to multiple partitions:

-- defrag goes faster

-- finer-grained control over backups

Correct me on this next one if I'm wrong -- one common bit of advice
is to create a separate partition for the Windows swap file so that
it doesn't get fragmented, but on most systems this doesn't actually
give a noticeable performance advantage.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
"What in heaven's name brought you to Casablanca?"
"My health. I came to Casablanca for the waters."
"The waters? What waters? We're in the desert."
"I was misinformed."
September 1, 2005 12:09:57 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Gordon" <gordon@gbpcomputing.co.uk.invalid> wrote

> "Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote

>> Put 20 gigs for the C drive
>
> Great minds think alike? :-)

Heh.

I have mine at 15 and wish I had put it at 20.

Alias
Anonymous
September 1, 2005 12:09:57 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Hi,

A separate partition on the same drive for the virtual memory is
ill-advised, as that increases head movement and may shorten the life of the
drive if paging is frequent.

--
Best of Luck,

Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
Windows help - www.rickrogers.org

"Stan Brown" <the_stan_brown@fastmail.fm> wrote in message
news:97nbh15sf36j41usdpmmnun4q0ta1iccmn@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 06:32:06 -0400, "Rick \"Nutcase\" Rogers"
> <rick@mvps.org> wrote:
>
>>Yes, you have to create at least one partition and format it for
>>installation. What size? That's up to you. You can use all the drive and
>>have one big C: if you like, or you can separate it into multiple smaller
>>volumes. I use the former for many client setups, as they don't want to
>>have
>>to navigate to various drives for saving and installation and prefer to
>>just
>>accept default placement. Personally, I use multiple volumes so that
>>stored
>>information is not affected by formatting and (re)installing different
>>OS's,
>>and can also be shared by such.
>
> Other benefits to multiple partitions:
>
> -- defrag goes faster
>
> -- finer-grained control over backups
>
> Correct me on this next one if I'm wrong -- one common bit of advice
> is to create a separate partition for the Windows swap file so that
> it doesn't get fragmented, but on most systems this doesn't actually
> give a noticeable performance advantage.
>
> --
> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> http://OakRoadSystems.com/
> "What in heaven's name brought you to Casablanca?"
> "My health. I came to Casablanca for the waters."
> "The waters? What waters? We're in the desert."
> "I was misinformed."
September 1, 2005 1:45:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Ok, so I have read the excellent article "Planning your partitions". And,
using his sample for his 80g + 20g - I only have the 1 large drive though,
would this be right or are some partitions too big - am I better off to
leave a larger "Future Expansion" partition.

C: Primary partion (active): 10gb Windows XP Pro
D: Swap File/page file: 500mg ???is this in the right spot for
one disk setup
E: Data 10gb (My Docs/IE Favs OE data
store)
F: Programs 10gb
G: Downloaded Programs 10gb
H: Disposable Temp Files 500mg
I: Downloads Prog CD's 10gb
J: Balance remaining space 110gb
K: Backups 30gb

Are the 10gb sizes too big, should I go smaller as per his specific sample?

Thanks again, any assistance greatly appreciated.

--
DeeDee


> Ok, finally installing XP Pro on new system box. Have a 200g SATA drive.
> Setup is asking me if I want to partition. Should I partition? If so,
what
> size, etc?
>
> Thanks in advance for all/any help.
>
> --
> DeeDee
>
>
September 1, 2005 1:45:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

You only need two partitions. One for C and one for D. Put all the programs,
swap file, OS, etc. on C and your data on D. Having multiple partitions is
silly.

Alias

"DeeDee" <dlyle@writeme.com> wrote

> Ok, so I have read the excellent article "Planning your partitions". And,
> using his sample for his 80g + 20g - I only have the 1 large drive though,
> would this be right or are some partitions too big - am I better off to
> leave a larger "Future Expansion" partition.
>
> C: Primary partion (active): 10gb Windows XP Pro
> D: Swap File/page file: 500mg ???is this in the right spot
> for
> one disk setup
> E: Data 10gb (My Docs/IE Favs OE
> data
> store)
> F: Programs 10gb
> G: Downloaded Programs 10gb
> H: Disposable Temp Files 500mg
> I: Downloads Prog CD's 10gb
> J: Balance remaining space 110gb
> K: Backups 30gb
>
> Are the 10gb sizes too big, should I go smaller as per his specific
> sample?
>
> Thanks again, any assistance greatly appreciated.
>
> --
> DeeDee
>
>
>> Ok, finally installing XP Pro on new system box. Have a 200g SATA
>> drive.
>> Setup is asking me if I want to partition. Should I partition? If so,
> what
>> size, etc?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for all/any help.
>>
>> --
>> DeeDee
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
September 1, 2005 1:45:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

In news:u9ChVFirFHA.304@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl,
DeeDee <dlyle@writeme.com> typed:

> Ok, so I have read the excellent article "Planning your
> partitions".
> And, using his sample for his 80g + 20g - I only have the 1
> large
> drive though, would this be right or are some partitions too
> big - am
> I better off to leave a larger "Future Expansion" partition.


This is far too many partitions. What you're planning will be
counterproductive. See below.



> C: Primary partion (active): 10gb Windows XP Pro


I'd make it bigger


> D: Swap File/page file: 500mg ???is this in the
> right
> spot for one disk setup


No. This is not a good idea, and can hurt your performance. What
this does is move the page file to a location on the hard drive
distant from the other frequently-used data on the drive. The
result is that every time Windows needs to use the page file, the
time to get to it and back from it is increased.
Putting the swap file on a second *physical* drive is a good
idea, since it decreases head movement, but not to a second
partition on a single drive. A good rule of thumb is that the
page file should be on the most-used partition of the least-used
physical drive. For almost everyone with a single physical drive,
that's C:.



> E: Data 10gb (My Docs/IE
> Favs
> OE data store)

> F: Programs 10gb


There's no advantage to separating programs from data.


> G: Downloaded Programs 10gb


Again, no advantage to separating this.


> H: Disposable Temp Files 500mg


Again, no advantage to separating this.


> I: Downloads Prog CD's 10gb


Again, no advantage to separating this.


> J: Balance remaining space 110gb


Why do you want this in a partition of its own?


> K: Backups 30gb


I don't recommend backup to a second non-removable hard drive
because it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
original and backup to many of the most common dangers: severe
power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even
theft of the computer.



In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of
those generations should be stored off-site.

My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a
sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary drive.



Every time you separate two type of files into separate
partitions, you run the risk that you will run out of space on
one partition which still having lots left on the other. You then
need third-party software to change the partition structure, or
else you can violate your own organizational rules by putting a
file where there's room for it instead of where it logically
belongs. If you do that (and most people do), the net result of
overpartitioning is, paradoxically, *less* organization.



I haven't seen anything in any of what you've posted that would
suggest that you would benefit by having more than two
partitions--probably a C: of 20-30GB for Windows, and the rest in
a a second partition.


--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
September 1, 2005 2:50:46 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Thanks for your prompt response. I've gone 20/180 and am formatting now.
--
DeeDee

"Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
news:eXK3KRirFHA.2008@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> You only need two partitions. One for C and one for D. Put all the
programs,
> swap file, OS, etc. on C and your data on D. Having multiple partitions is
> silly.
>
> Alias
>
> "DeeDee" <dlyle@writeme.com> wrote
>
> > Ok, so I have read the excellent article "Planning your partitions".
And,
> > using his sample for his 80g + 20g - I only have the 1 large drive
though,
> > would this be right or are some partitions too big - am I better off to
> > leave a larger "Future Expansion" partition.
> >
> > C: Primary partion (active): 10gb Windows XP Pro
> > D: Swap File/page file: 500mg ???is this in the right spot
> > for
> > one disk setup
> > E: Data 10gb (My Docs/IE Favs OE
> > data
> > store)
> > F: Programs 10gb
> > G: Downloaded Programs 10gb
> > H: Disposable Temp Files 500mg
> > I: Downloads Prog CD's 10gb
> > J: Balance remaining space 110gb
> > K: Backups 30gb
> >
> > Are the 10gb sizes too big, should I go smaller as per his specific
> > sample?
> >
> > Thanks again, any assistance greatly appreciated.
> >
> > --
> > DeeDee
> >
> >
> >> Ok, finally installing XP Pro on new system box. Have a 200g SATA
> >> drive.
> >> Setup is asking me if I want to partition. Should I partition? If so,
> > what
> >> size, etc?
> >>
> >> Thanks in advance for all/any help.
> >>
> >> --
> >> DeeDee
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
September 1, 2005 4:52:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

On Wed, 31 Aug 2005 20:09:54 +1000, "DeeDee" <dlyle@writeme.com>
wrote:

>Ok, finally installing XP Pro on new system box. Have a 200g SATA drive.
>Setup is asking me if I want to partition. Should I partition? If so, what
>size, etc?
>
>Thanks in advance for all/any help.

Some people like partitions, others like one huge C: drive. It's
simply a personal preference--you don't have to do it.
--
Top 10 Conservative Idiots:
http://www.democraticunderground.com/top10/
!