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HP Computers

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October 18, 2003 6:16:57 PM

Do Hp make good computers? I tried talking my dad into building one but he didn't want to so I checked around and found that HP made the best computer for around $1000. Is the quality of thier components any good?

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Vortex on 10/18/03 02:25 PM.</EM></FONT></P>

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October 18, 2003 6:27:23 PM

i work for a pc repair shop and we have to fix more damn hp's then anything. not only that but they are a bitch to work on because of the case design.
October 18, 2003 6:29:57 PM

If you have to buy a premade, get a Dell. Although, Wal-Mart has a fairly decen budget system from Compaq for about $499 including monitor. It's based on an Athlon 2400.
-Brett
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October 19, 2003 2:10:16 AM

Ide say keep tryin on your dad, get him on the comp you have now and make him start readin through these forums. He'll realize how easy and cheaper it is and then it shouldnt be hard to convince him.

AMD Barton 2500+ @ 3200+ speeds
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October 19, 2003 3:30:37 AM

I've tried like a hundred times but he won't do it he knows it would be cheaper but he dosen't want to have to mess with all the hassle in installing the software ya know all the drivers and stuff for it.

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Vortex on 10/18/03 11:31 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
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October 19, 2003 3:41:43 AM

Dell is the most problem free, but uses proprietary parts.

If you know EXACTLY what you're doing, you can order a Gateway custom built with a standard ATX board, a decent AGP video card, etc.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
October 19, 2003 8:36:42 AM

Quote:
Dell is the most problem free, but uses proprietary parts.


Maybe where you live. :tongue:

I hate almost ANY pre-fab PC. There are only a few notable exceptions: Alienware, Voodoo, and Falcon Northwest. To me, PCs aren't something that's meant to be mass-produced.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
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October 19, 2003 9:34:57 AM

They can be hell to work on, but are the least failure prone OEM IMO.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
October 21, 2003 3:58:26 AM

i agree with you zoron, he should build his dad the puter and load it up, create a custom restore disc and his dad would have the same restore benifit as a pre-built. did it for my dad and now i dont have to have it shipped to me when he messes it up.

Fat, Drunk, and Stupid is no way to go through life Son.
October 21, 2003 9:37:59 PM

Thanks for all the info but I won't need it anymore because I won't be building till next year now but thanks anyways to learn that about HP. They may not make good computers but they make great printers!!!
October 22, 2003 2:23:58 PM

The place I work awarded a 2 billion$+ computer contract to hp/compaq. After working on countless (I've probally personally laid hands on a few thousand in the last couple years) hp/compaq machines, I can honestly say, I can only recommend that everyone avoid them at all costs. They're crap. I support around 1500 of the give or take, and I'd say we have to call compaq out for warrenty support at least 5-6 times a week minimum and that's a bit unrealistically low (but we'll figure it at that 52x5=250 breakdowns / year for 1500 pc... and we just replaced them all this year... so you figure that's 1 in 6 pc's break in the first year.)

Go dell... you pay a touch more but it's not a total pos.

Edit: Oh yes, they do make a mighty fine printer though.

Shadus<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by shadus on 10/22/03 10:27 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
October 22, 2003 8:29:05 PM

Quote:
They can be hell to work on, but are the least failure prone OEM IMO.


Actually... I'm glad that's NOT true in my area. It seems we get called out on average twice a week to fix a Dell machine. Granted, we cover a fairly large area... but from what I've seen Dells fail at least as often as anything else; if not more.

I won't even get into mis-diagnosis and incorrect parts. At least with a Compaq or HP I was able to order the exact part I needed. With Dell, the part is ordered for you and there is no way of getting another part until you go onsite and prove that the incorrect part was sent. Meanwhile, the customer is looking at 4 days downtime.

I'm not trying to bash Dell... but they're no better than anyone else IMO. I get paid to fix them, so for me it's great that they fail as often as they do.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
October 22, 2003 10:54:03 PM

I would be interested in learning how to make that custom recovery disk thing. I built a comp for my aunt who lives 2 hours away, and if she F's it up, I'm gonna have to take entire day to go and check it out.

Women--can't live with them, can't have heterosexual same-species intercourse without them.
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October 22, 2003 11:15:20 PM

I'm a refurbisher and I've never had a quality problem with any of the Dell's I've bought used and sold.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
October 23, 2003 12:47:56 AM

the way i did it for my dad was with my hp burner at the time, it came with adaptec cd creator software that would back-up your entire hard drive to cd-r or cd-rw my dads took 4 discs, but it depends the system. i imagine there is software out there that will work with any cd burner to make a custom restore disc set.

Fat, Drunk, and Stupid is no way to go through life Son.
October 23, 2003 4:10:17 PM

I think symantec makes it, try finding "ghost" it's for making an image of a system basically.

Shadus
October 23, 2003 7:09:33 PM

I know this post is late. But I can't resist flaming HP. My brother and father have HPs- in trying help them repair and/or upgrade I found the hardware components to be below par. The bios are truncated severly reducing flexibility. the mobo is encrypted so that the OS won't work unless that mobo is used. This severly restricts upgrade (e.g., no way to upgrade mobo cuz HDD won't now work). You don't own the OS software, so you can't get a copy. There was zip for documentation on system specs. On and On and On, nothing but trouble with weak components and HP roadblocks to prevent one from solveing problems. It seems clear that they don't want the customer working on their computer, get a virus or a problem? Too bad, just buy another machine from us so we can more money on our disposable product.

btw, I know they offer reconfiguration discs - but they weren't included with machines at purchase. You have to just know about them, call, order, pay and wait until shipped to you. It's like they don't really want anyone to have the disc, but have to make it available so they can't be sued in class action. IMHO

XP 2000+
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512MB PC2700
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Win98SE
October 23, 2003 7:46:48 PM

Quote:
the mobo is encrypted so that the OS won't work unless that mobo is used.


Has nothing to do with the motherboard being encrypted. The restore CD looks for a BIOS string in the DMI that refers to the manufacturer of the PC. If it reads anything other than what it was designed for, it doesn't install. M$ came up with this scheme to help prevent people pirating OEM copies of their OS.

Quote:
You don't own the OS software, so you can't get a copy.


Actually, you do OWN a copy of the OS, since you own the computer. If M$ won't provide you with a legal copy (you just give them your valid CD key), then you should be able to get a copy from your local computer shop. All they need to see is that license sticker on your case.

Quote:
It seems clear that they don't want the customer working on their computer, get a virus or a problem? Too bad, just buy another machine from us so we can more money on our disposable product.


You'll find that most OEMs offer very little in the way of free software support. Really though... if you do get a virus, how is HP responsible for that? In this day and age it is the customer's responsibility to ensure they are sufficiently safeguarded against viruses. Now, if you could prove that the virus infected your machine as a direct result of a manufacturing flaw, you might have a case. Don't blame HP, blame M$ for it's lack of security.

I'm not defending HP. I'm merely pointing out that even if you do own one, you have options. All you have to do is exercise them. It may be a pain in the a$$... but then computers can be at the best of times.


<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
October 23, 2003 11:14:38 PM

You can get Norton Ghost with Norton's Systemworks - a great bundle in my opinion. I used Ghost all the time at my internship this summer. Once the image of your partition was made it takes around ten to fifteen minutes to restore the computer. Plus I think when they make an image of your harddrive, they compress it. The version of Ghost I used also allowed you to save the image to a different partition and restore it from there - no recovery CD required. Anyways, my thoughts on matter, take it with a grain of salt.

<font color=blue><b>Purchase object A, install object A, curse object A, repeat...</b></font color=blue>
October 24, 2003 6:51:23 AM

You know you can still get a computer made up at your local small buisness computer store. They will load all the apps you want if you give them the cds etc, they will install windows and all drivers and probably at no great expense. You will also get a warrenty and probably friendly service with a smile. You will get good over the phone help too. My advice is find a good store that has been in buisness for a while and has reasonable prices. I found one that charged an extra $20 to build the system i had choosen. Give the big companies the flick they have to many middle men and thus charge an absolute fortune.

If he doesn't die, he'll get help!!!
October 24, 2003 8:40:31 PM

In reply to: "Has nothing to do with the motherboard being encrypted. The restore CD looks for a BIOS string in the DMI that refers to the manufacturer of the PC. If it reads anything other than what it was designed for, it doesn't install. M$ came up with this scheme to help prevent people pirating OEM copies of their OS."

I'm likely getting the terms wrong as I am somewhat of a nOOb. Perhaps what you say and what I read are the same thing only I don't recognize it (e.g., DMI string = chip) I got my info from the HP forum, below is a portion of what I saw there:

"The OEM MB has a chip with the correct information to unlock the recovery CDs. To run the HP recovery CDs, HP needs to tattoo the new MB ("ain't gonna happen")."

I'm not slick enough to post a link, but you could copy and paste this to get to the forum, if interested. :) 

http://forums1.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/bizsupport/pa...

My real point is you can't upgrade/replace mobo :(  I think that sucks!

If you read the (skimpy) documentation that comes w/the HP you will find that you Do Not Own the o/s. Merely lease it. Windows will Not give you another/disc. Been thru that w/them. You do not get a cd key code. You do not get a cd. I will accept that a local shop may give you a copy if you bring in your box (I did not try that-I guess I was too pessimistic to think somebody would give me, a noncustomer, somthing for free ).

But why put up w/this crap? The two people in my family that bought HP were disapointed to find out about these things and resulting difficulties in trying to repair or upgrade the thing. I bring these things up in forums so others won't get an unpleasent surprise too.

XP 2000+
MSI KT3 ULTRA-2 KT333
Maxtor 60GB ATA 133 7200RPM
512MB PC2700
ABIT G4 Ti4200 OTES 64MB
Win98SE
October 24, 2003 8:47:31 PM

You do have a CD key. If you don't, then HP is in violation of their agreement with M$. Every OEM computer sold MUST have an OEM license sticker from M$ attached to the case. This is proof that you have a legal copy of a M$ operating system installed. Of course, if your computer didn't come with Windows, it wouldn't have one of those stickers.

It's apparent to me that HP will say whatever they need to say to excuse them not providing the customers with CDs right out of the box... instead making them pay for them. That license sticker says YOU own a legal copy of Windows... as you own the computer it's installed on. It chaps me to no end that most big OEMs refuse to provide you with software you have a legal right to.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
October 24, 2003 9:56:32 PM

They dont give you the full Windows cd do you cant transfer the license to another computer. You may have a cd key but technically you dont OWN the software. If you trash the computer and get a different one (eg build your own), you cant transfer the old OS to the new computer. Why?! You dont have a legal copy (CD) of the software. So what do you own? A sticker with a code on it that lets you use "your paid for" copy of Windows only on the origional computer.
Thats why there have been lawsuits over the restore cd, backup images only on hard drive, and such. Yes I think its bullsh!t, and I work for a company that builds the HP computers.
Yes thats right, HP does not build their own computers anymore. Its contracted out to a company that I wont name. But if you guessed Foxconn you may be right. OOPS.
October 26, 2003 1:20:57 AM

That's interesting that you mentioned Foxconn. I am a Houstonian living in Florida (and missing home). A friend of mine worked for Foxconn building Compaq computers (now HP), and he said that Compaq did a lot of finger pointing at Foxconn over components being put on wrong or something, but Foxconn proved that they were only going by what Compaq provided.

I worked at Compaq as a contractor and saw what goes on inside there. I won't get myself into legal trouble by saying too much of what I saw there, but I will say that they don't care about their customers, IMHO, and they even laughed at a customer that was concerned about a virus, calling him stupid. One supervisor I worked with told me that his opinion is that Compaq (now HP) HAS to make disposable PC's in order to be competitive. Also, I was let go (a.k.a. laid off [so they tell me]) because I found a flaw in a piece of software that had already been shipped. Guess what? I was in QA! I was supposed to find flaws!

My opinion after 20 years messing with computers: always buy a clone for home. Name brands are nice for businesses interested in making images of hard drives. I don't buy the argument of "Well, I get a free operating system and free software with a name brand". A lot of the thrown in software is trialware. You get more flexibility in a clone machine. 2.2 Ghz on one board is faster than 2.2 Ghz on another board. Brand of motherboard, video card, etc. matters. My brother argues that my Dad is just fine with his name brand at his age, and I would have to agree that Dad has had no major problems, but I still can't see buying a name brand for the home of any intelligent person, and my Dad is very intelligent. He's slowly getting into more and more things, and he's starting to feel the limitations of his name brand.

Sorry to go on and on, but I haven't posted to anything in about 5 or 6 years.
October 26, 2003 6:13:17 AM

Quote:
They dont give you the full Windows cd do you cant transfer the license to another computer. You may have a cd key but technically you dont OWN the software. If you trash the computer and get a different one (eg build your own), you cant transfer the old OS to the new computer. Why?! You dont have a legal copy (CD) of the software. So what do you own? A sticker with a code on it that lets you use "your paid for" copy of Windows only on the origional computer.


I understand the point. Technically, you're supposed to sell OEM copies of software with the original computer they were purchased with... and not transfer the software to a different computer. This reminds me exactly why I hate M$ licensing schemes.

Foxconn... interesting you should mention that. I've seen the Foxconn name on Compaq computers for years and never really thought anything of it.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
October 26, 2003 7:42:07 AM

If MS screwed you, go screw MS. It's not that hard to download a less than legal copy of windows.

<font color=blue>
The farce is ended; draw the curtain </font color=blue>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 15, 2009 8:51:46 PM

So far, most of what y'all said is way above my pay grade.

I am a Grandmother who's grandson brought my archaic computer into the shop he worked in and rebuilt it about two years ago. He's now working in Texas and not available to help me with my latest problem. My sound is gone. Just ......zip....gone. I probably need a new sound card, and he told me he left the HP license agreement installed, but I have NO idea how to go about getting a sound card. Do you think I should just get a new computer?

!