Bios

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I know the bios isn't hardware but I'm sure some of you out there will
be able to advise.
Should I bother to upgrade my bios or will it just give me problems?
I'm using a G1 Optiplex and have bios rev A03 - I believe the current
is A09 or A10. Also if I should upgrade it do I need to upgrade to 4
then 5 and so on or do I just get the latest?
Many Thanks
Kia

==============
Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
27 answers Last reply
More about bios
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Kia_Breizzze" <lakassa21@yahoo.co-dot-uk.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:40a29654$1_4@news.athenanews.com...
    >I know the bios isn't hardware but I'm sure some of you out there will
    > be able to advise.
    > Should I bother to upgrade my bios or will it just give me problems?
    > I'm using a G1 Optiplex and have bios rev A03 - I believe the current
    > is A09 or A10. Also if I should upgrade it do I need to upgrade to 4
    > then 5 and so on or do I just get the latest?
    > Many Thanks
    > Kia
    >
    > ==============
    > Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware
    > troubleshooting newsgroups.

    "Why?".

    No need to flash unless you intend to fix a current problem or anticipate a
    problem with some upgrade.


    Stew
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    You should upgrade your BIOS before you add new hardware and before you
    upgrade your operating system. Other than that, there is no need.
    Nonetheless, there are people who like to upgrade their BIOS regardless.

    Whenever you upgrade a BIOS, you use the latest version, i.e., no need to do
    them one at a time.

    You have to be careful when upgrading your BIOS, because if something goes
    wrong, your computer won't boot. That said, as long as you follow the
    instructions carefully, have a UPS in good working order, and don't do it
    during a thunderstorm, you won't have any trouble.

    Rocky

    "Kia_Breizzze" <lakassa21@yahoo.co-dot-uk.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:40a29654$1_4@news.athenanews.com...
    > I know the bios isn't hardware but I'm sure some of you out there will
    > be able to advise.
    > Should I bother to upgrade my bios or will it just give me problems?
    > I'm using a G1 Optiplex and have bios rev A03 - I believe the current
    > is A09 or A10. Also if I should upgrade it do I need to upgrade to 4
    > then 5 and so on or do I just get the latest?
    > Many Thanks
    > Kia
    >
    > ==============
    > Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware
    troubleshooting newsgroups.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I agree with Stew, especially if your Dell is NOT attached to a UPS. Not
    worth the risk, albeit slight, that a power surge or outage might hit in the
    middle of the flash, which could turn your PC into a boat anchor or
    doorstop.
    HH

    "S.Lewis" <stew1960@mail.com> wrote in message
    news:s_woc.3762$z41.1650@bignews1.bellsouth.net...
    >
    > "Kia_Breizzze" <lakassa21@yahoo.co-dot-uk.no-spam.invalid> wrote in
    message
    > news:40a29654$1_4@news.athenanews.com...
    > >I know the bios isn't hardware but I'm sure some of you out there will
    > > be able to advise.
    > > Should I bother to upgrade my bios or will it just give me problems?
    > > I'm using a G1 Optiplex and have bios rev A03 - I believe the current
    > > is A09 or A10. Also if I should upgrade it do I need to upgrade to 4
    > > then 5 and so on or do I just get the latest?
    > > Many Thanks
    > > Kia
    > >
    > > ==============
    > > Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware
    > > troubleshooting newsgroups.
    >
    > "Why?".
    >
    > No need to flash unless you intend to fix a current problem or anticipate
    a
    > problem with some upgrade.
    >
    >
    > Stew
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    The OP is very far behind on BIOS updates. One risk he runs is that it
    might add an unknown if he does have problems. Also if he calls for support
    and he's that far behind, they might just tell him to update anyways.

    BIOS flashes take what? 30 seconds? A UPS is nice to have but not
    necessary IMO. Just don't do it on Friday the 13th and do your research
    AHEAD of time (ie. saving the old BIOS or having a recovery plan if
    something DOES happen). And try not to use any BIOS flash utilities that
    aren't floppy based.

    YMMV


    "HH" <hahunt42@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:XkBoc.57$al.27@fe25.usenetserver.com...
    > I agree with Stew, especially if your Dell is NOT attached to a UPS. Not
    > worth the risk, albeit slight, that a power surge or outage might hit in
    the
    > middle of the flash, which could turn your PC into a boat anchor or
    > doorstop.
    > HH
    >
    > "S.Lewis" <stew1960@mail.com> wrote in message
    > news:s_woc.3762$z41.1650@bignews1.bellsouth.net...
    > >
    > > "Kia_Breizzze" <lakassa21@yahoo.co-dot-uk.no-spam.invalid> wrote in
    > message
    > > news:40a29654$1_4@news.athenanews.com...
    > > >I know the bios isn't hardware but I'm sure some of you out there will
    > > > be able to advise.
    > > > Should I bother to upgrade my bios or will it just give me problems?
    > > > I'm using a G1 Optiplex and have bios rev A03 - I believe the current
    > > > is A09 or A10. Also if I should upgrade it do I need to upgrade to 4
    > > > then 5 and so on or do I just get the latest?
    > > > Many Thanks
    > > > Kia
    > > >
    > > > ==============
    > > > Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware
    > > > troubleshooting newsgroups.
    > >
    > > "Why?".
    > >
    > > No need to flash unless you intend to fix a current problem or
    anticipate
    > a
    > > problem with some upgrade.
    > >
    > >
    > > Stew
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "snoopy" <snoop-dog@my-doghouse.com> wrote in message
    news:EMGdnVUhe9VNdT_dRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    > The OP is very far behind on BIOS updates. One risk he runs is that it
    > might add an unknown if he does have problems. Also if he calls for
    > support
    > and he's that far behind, they might just tell him to update anyways.
    >
    <snip>

    Fair enough, but flip that logic over. His machine now is (in theory) a
    known quantity based on its current and past performance.

    If he flashes, he adds a significant unknown to any upgrades or future
    machine performance/behavior.


    Stew
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "S.Lewis" <stew1960@mail.com> wrote in message
    news:FXBoc.23610$su1.2204@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
    >
    > "snoopy" <snoop-dog@my-doghouse.com> wrote in message
    > news:EMGdnVUhe9VNdT_dRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    > > The OP is very far behind on BIOS updates. One risk he runs is that it
    > > might add an unknown if he does have problems. Also if he calls for
    > > support
    > > and he's that far behind, they might just tell him to update anyways.
    > >
    > <snip>
    >
    > Fair enough, but flip that logic over. His machine now is (in theory) a
    > known quantity based on its current and past performance.
    >
    > If he flashes, he adds a significant unknown to any upgrades or future
    > machine performance/behavior.
    >
    >
    > Stew

    But systems are full of unknowns until they rear their ugly head, usually at
    the worse possible time. Anybody with a PC should have overcome their fear
    of the unknown hehehe.

    One caveat I would include is that to never, unless absolutely necessary,
    flash to a just released BIOS. Wait and see what may have been screwed up
    by the new BIOS. It seems to happen more frequently than it should. If the
    BIOS has been out for a while it's probably OK. And a great time to flash
    (get your mind out of the gutter!;-) is just before a reinstall of the OS.
    You will already have done backups, RIGHT?!
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "snoopy" <snoop-dog@my-doghouse.com> wrote:

    >"S.Lewis" <stew1960@mail.com> wrote

    >> "snoopy" <snoop-dog@my-doghouse.com> wrote in

    >> > The OP is very far behind on BIOS updates. One risk he runs is that it
    >> > might add an unknown if he does have problems. Also if he calls for
    >> > support and he's that far behind, they might just tell him to update anyways.

    >> Fair enough, but flip that logic over. His machine now is (in theory) a
    >> known quantity based on its current and past performance.
    >>
    >> If he flashes, he adds a significant unknown to any upgrades or future
    >> machine performance/behavior.

    >But systems are full of unknowns until they rear their ugly head, usually at
    >the worse possible time. Anybody with a PC should have overcome their fear
    >of the unknown hehehe.

    >One caveat I would include is that to never, unless absolutely necessary,
    >flash to a just released BIOS. Wait and see what may have been screwed up
    >by the new BIOS. It seems to happen more frequently than it should. If the
    >BIOS has been out for a while it's probably OK. And a great time to flash
    >(get your mind out of the gutter!;-) is just before a reinstall of the OS.
    >You will already have done backups, RIGHT?!

    I dunno the mainframe equivalent, since I, although old enough,
    never worked with them. I did start out with IBM-PC clones when
    they first appeared.

    In twenty years of using "IBM-Clones/Wintel computers/whatever
    the current catch phrase is for them" them, I have experienced
    only five situations where a BIOS upgrade warranted install.
    [One, the fourth, went south and killed the computer].

    However far behind the OP is in their BIOS updates, their
    computer is showing no problems, as related.

    A BIOS upgrade is unwarranted. Until the OP's computer starts
    showing problems that can *only* be corrected by such.

    [In which case, the OP, UPS purchased and all data backed up 3x,
    can essay the BIOS update.]
    --
    OJ III
    [Email sent to Yahoo address is burned before reading.
    Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    sometimes there are problems with the original bios (errors on startup) or
    your going add a hard drive which the old bios won't recognize. Sometimes
    you upgrade for it to recognize a faster cpu.
    If your not going to upgrade or your not getting problems, then there is no
    reason to flash the bios. Unless instructed by the manufacture in this case
    Dell.
    "Kia_Breizzze" <lakassa21@yahoo.co-dot-uk.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:40a29654$1_4@news.athenanews.com...
    > I know the bios isn't hardware but I'm sure some of you out there will
    > be able to advise.
    > Should I bother to upgrade my bios or will it just give me problems?
    > I'm using a G1 Optiplex and have bios rev A03 - I believe the current
    > is A09 or A10. Also if I should upgrade it do I need to upgrade to 4
    > then 5 and so on or do I just get the latest?
    > Many Thanks
    > Kia
    >
    > ==============
    > Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware
    troubleshooting newsgroups.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    HH wrote:
    > I agree with Stew, especially if your Dell is NOT attached to a UPS. Not
    > worth the risk, albeit slight, that a power surge or outage might hit in the
    > middle of the flash, which could turn your PC into a boat anchor or
    > doorstop.

    I would also recommend you assume the worst, i.e., that the new BIOS has
    some sort of problem, and make sure you have your current BIOS on a
    floppy so you can reflash back if necessary. This ability has saved my
    rear end more than once.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Before upgrading a BIOS, one must first learn what that BIOS
    upgrades. Answering the OP's question and yet not one
    responder even asked what the upgrade fixes. Answers without
    first learning basic facts. BIOS is a dangerous and often
    unnecessary operation. Most of what the BIOS does has long
    since been proven. Once a computer is booted, the BIOS is
    replaced by Operating System functions (except if using
    obsolete OSes such and Windows 9x/ME or DOS).

    Kia_Breizzze - first provide important facts. What does the
    upgrade fix? Computer boots just fine. Therefore most likely
    those upgrades only fix things you don't even have or use.
    First post facts. What would be fixed by that BIOS upgrade?
    All previous answers were just wild speculation or accurately
    noted the danger to maybe no benefit. First get facts. What
    would that upgrade accomplish?

    snoopy wrote:
    > But systems are full of unknowns until they rear their ugly head,
    > usually at the worse possible time. Anybody with a PC should
    > have overcome their fear of the unknown hehehe.
    >
    > One caveat I would include is that to never, unless absolutely
    > necessary, flash to a just released BIOS. Wait and see what
    > may have been screwed up by the new BIOS. It seems to happen
    > more frequently than it should. If the BIOS has been out for a
    > while it's probably OK. And a great time to flash (get your
    > mind out of the gutter!;-) is just before a reinstall of the OS.
    > You will already have done backups, RIGHT?!
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I've flashed many BIOSes without any problem. IMO many exaggerate the
    dangers needlessly. Given proper preparation and research the operation is
    not dangerous. I think the people that screw it up many times haven't read
    and understand the instructions. The number of BIOS updates that go wrong
    is miniscule compared to how many go without a hitch. Being 7 revs behind
    on the BIOS is not a good thing IMO. How do you know the OP isn't having
    problems that are already fixed with one of the BIOS updates?


    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:40A39806.3054B3D6@hotmail.com...
    > Before upgrading a BIOS, one must first learn what that BIOS
    > upgrades. Answering the OP's question and yet not one
    > responder even asked what the upgrade fixes. Answers without
    > first learning basic facts. BIOS is a dangerous and often
    > unnecessary operation. Most of what the BIOS does has long
    > since been proven. Once a computer is booted, the BIOS is
    > replaced by Operating System functions (except if using
    > obsolete OSes such and Windows 9x/ME or DOS).
    >
    > Kia_Breizzze - first provide important facts. What does the
    > upgrade fix? Computer boots just fine. Therefore most likely
    > those upgrades only fix things you don't even have or use.
    > First post facts. What would be fixed by that BIOS upgrade?
    > All previous answers were just wild speculation or accurately
    > noted the danger to maybe no benefit. First get facts. What
    > would that upgrade accomplish?
    >
    > snoopy wrote:
    > > But systems are full of unknowns until they rear their ugly head,
    > > usually at the worse possible time. Anybody with a PC should
    > > have overcome their fear of the unknown hehehe.
    > >
    > > One caveat I would include is that to never, unless absolutely
    > > necessary, flash to a just released BIOS. Wait and see what
    > > may have been screwed up by the new BIOS. It seems to happen
    > > more frequently than it should. If the BIOS has been out for a
    > > while it's probably OK. And a great time to flash (get your
    > > mind out of the gutter!;-) is just before a reinstall of the OS.
    > > You will already have done backups, RIGHT?!
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Spend some time in tech support and you will change your mind about the
    risks inviolved in BIOS flashing. Again, unless the BIOS update has an
    enhamncement or fix that the user REQUIRES, it is foolish to take that risk.
    HH

    "snoopy" <snoop-dog@my-doghouse.com> wrote in message
    news:CsqdnXlVLJxaLT7dRVn-uw@comcast.com...
    > I've flashed many BIOSes without any problem. IMO many exaggerate the
    > dangers needlessly. Given proper preparation and research the operation
    is
    > not dangerous. I think the people that screw it up many times haven't
    read
    > and understand the instructions. The number of BIOS updates that go wrong
    > is miniscule compared to how many go without a hitch. Being 7 revs behind
    > on the BIOS is not a good thing IMO. How do you know the OP isn't having
    > problems that are already fixed with one of the BIOS updates?
    >
    >
    > "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:40A39806.3054B3D6@hotmail.com...
    > > Before upgrading a BIOS, one must first learn what that BIOS
    > > upgrades. Answering the OP's question and yet not one
    > > responder even asked what the upgrade fixes. Answers without
    > > first learning basic facts. BIOS is a dangerous and often
    > > unnecessary operation. Most of what the BIOS does has long
    > > since been proven. Once a computer is booted, the BIOS is
    > > replaced by Operating System functions (except if using
    > > obsolete OSes such and Windows 9x/ME or DOS).
    > >
    > > Kia_Breizzze - first provide important facts. What does the
    > > upgrade fix? Computer boots just fine. Therefore most likely
    > > those upgrades only fix things you don't even have or use.
    > > First post facts. What would be fixed by that BIOS upgrade?
    > > All previous answers were just wild speculation or accurately
    > > noted the danger to maybe no benefit. First get facts. What
    > > would that upgrade accomplish?
    > >
    > > snoopy wrote:
    > > > But systems are full of unknowns until they rear their ugly head,
    > > > usually at the worse possible time. Anybody with a PC should
    > > > have overcome their fear of the unknown hehehe.
    > > >
    > > > One caveat I would include is that to never, unless absolutely
    > > > necessary, flash to a just released BIOS. Wait and see what
    > > > may have been screwed up by the new BIOS. It seems to happen
    > > > more frequently than it should. If the BIOS has been out for a
    > > > while it's probably OK. And a great time to flash (get your
    > > > mind out of the gutter!;-) is just before a reinstall of the OS.
    > > > You will already have done backups, RIGHT?!
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:40A39806.3054B3D6@hotmail.com...
    > Before upgrading a BIOS, one must first learn what that BIOS
    > upgrades. Answering the OP's question and yet not one
    > responder even asked what the upgrade fixes. Answers without
    > first learning basic facts. BIOS is a dangerous and often
    > unnecessary operation. Most of what the BIOS does has long
    > since been proven. Once a computer is booted, the BIOS is
    > replaced by Operating System functions (except if using
    > obsolete OSes such and Windows 9x/ME or DOS).
    >

    <snip>


    Someone must've said "whole house grounding".


    Stew
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "HH" <hahunt42@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:p1Poc.2$9P1.0@fe25.usenetserver.com...
    > Spend some time in tech support and you will change your mind about the
    > risks inviolved in BIOS flashing. Again, unless the BIOS update has an
    > enhamncement or fix that the user REQUIRES, it is foolish to take that
    > risk.
    > HH
    >

    <snip>

    Werd.

    Or, for those who still aren't getting it, "if it ain't broke, don't fix
    it."


    Stew
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I wasn't going to take a side in this discussion, but what the heck...

    It's just like HH says it: Why take the risk? Admittedly, that risk is small
    if you're prepared and careful, but why take it if there's no need? BIOSes
    recognize hardware attributes - beyond that they do not improve performance
    or solve software problems. Sometimes, recognizing a hardware attribute
    solves a problem - as it does when you install a hard disk larger than 137
    GB or want to use advanced power management - but that doesn't make it a
    performance improver.

    I guess it comes down to your philosophy of using a computer.

    Rocky

    "HH" <hahunt42@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:p1Poc.2$9P1.0@fe25.usenetserver.com...
    > Spend some time in tech support and you will change your mind about the
    > risks inviolved in BIOS flashing. Again, unless the BIOS update has an
    > enhamncement or fix that the user REQUIRES, it is foolish to take that
    risk.
    > HH
    >
    > "snoopy" <snoop-dog@my-doghouse.com> wrote in message
    > news:CsqdnXlVLJxaLT7dRVn-uw@comcast.com...
    > > I've flashed many BIOSes without any problem. IMO many exaggerate the
    > > dangers needlessly. Given proper preparation and research the operation
    > is
    > > not dangerous. I think the people that screw it up many times haven't
    > read
    > > and understand the instructions. The number of BIOS updates that go
    wrong
    > > is miniscule compared to how many go without a hitch. Being 7 revs
    behind
    > > on the BIOS is not a good thing IMO. How do you know the OP isn't
    having
    > > problems that are already fixed with one of the BIOS updates?
    > >
    > >
    > > "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:40A39806.3054B3D6@hotmail.com...
    > > > Before upgrading a BIOS, one must first learn what that BIOS
    > > > upgrades. Answering the OP's question and yet not one
    > > > responder even asked what the upgrade fixes. Answers without
    > > > first learning basic facts. BIOS is a dangerous and often
    > > > unnecessary operation. Most of what the BIOS does has long
    > > > since been proven. Once a computer is booted, the BIOS is
    > > > replaced by Operating System functions (except if using
    > > > obsolete OSes such and Windows 9x/ME or DOS).
    > > >
    > > > Kia_Breizzze - first provide important facts. What does the
    > > > upgrade fix? Computer boots just fine. Therefore most likely
    > > > those upgrades only fix things you don't even have or use.
    > > > First post facts. What would be fixed by that BIOS upgrade?
    > > > All previous answers were just wild speculation or accurately
    > > > noted the danger to maybe no benefit. First get facts. What
    > > > would that upgrade accomplish?
    > > >
    > > > snoopy wrote:
    > > > > But systems are full of unknowns until they rear their ugly head,
    > > > > usually at the worse possible time. Anybody with a PC should
    > > > > have overcome their fear of the unknown hehehe.
    > > > >
    > > > > One caveat I would include is that to never, unless absolutely
    > > > > necessary, flash to a just released BIOS. Wait and see what
    > > > > may have been screwed up by the new BIOS. It seems to happen
    > > > > more frequently than it should. If the BIOS has been out for a
    > > > > while it's probably OK. And a great time to flash (get your
    > > > > mind out of the gutter!;-) is just before a reinstall of the OS.
    > > > > You will already have done backups, RIGHT?!
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Thanks and I kinda get the picture which is don't bother.
    I expected the answers to go one of two ways a)do it and do it now or
    b) no don't do it if at all possible.
    I figure from the replies that if i randomly went ahead and did this
    that I'd probably be back (on someone els'e pc :roll: ) to ask how do
    I fix it - if it can go wrong it usually does so I'll be leaving it
    as is for the time being :wink:

    ==============
    Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    A wise decision, since tthere often is no way to "fix it" if a BIOS flash
    goes bad or is interrupted. You are left with a boat anchor or doorstop.
    Stew said it succinctly "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
    HH

    "Kia_Breizzze" <lakassa21@yahoo.co-dot-uk.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:40a4991d_7@news.athenanews.com...
    > Thanks and I kinda get the picture which is don't bother.
    > I expected the answers to go one of two ways a)do it and do it now or
    > b) no don't do it if at all possible.
    > I figure from the replies that if i randomly went ahead and did this
    > that I'd probably be back (on someone els'e pc :roll: ) to ask how do
    > I fix it - if it can go wrong it usually does so I'll be leaving it
    > as is for the time being :wink:
    >
    > ==============
    > Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware
    troubleshooting newsgroups.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    snoopy <snoop-dog@my-doghouse.com> coughed up the following:

    > I've flashed many BIOSes without any problem. IMO many exaggerate the
    > dangers needlessly. Given proper preparation and research the
    > operation is not dangerous. I think the people that screw it up many
    > times haven't read and understand the instructions. The number of
    > BIOS updates that go wrong is miniscule compared to how many go
    > without a hitch. Being 7 revs behind on the BIOS is not a good thing
    > IMO. How do you know the OP isn't having problems that are already
    > fixed with one of the BIOS updates?


    /WHY/ is being 7 revs behind on the BIOS particularly bad? /IF/ the OP
    doesn't seem to be having problems, then it seems like tempting fate to
    flash to the latest flavor. If there is something in the BIOS that
    might be going wrong without him knowing it, say it slows down his
    system without his knowing it, if you blindly flash routinely you must
    take into account that the new bios(es) might make it worse.

    ....[slash]...


    --
    While using is ok, actually /writing/ free software is a disingenuous
    activity. You can afford to write software for free only because of
    someone else somewhere actually paying for it. Just say no.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    HH <hahunt42@hotmail.com> coughed up the following:

    > Spend some time in tech support and you will change your mind about
    > the risks inviolved in BIOS flashing. Again, unless the BIOS update
    > has an enhamncement or fix that the user REQUIRES, it is foolish to
    > take that risk. HH

    Yes. Agreed. I second that. You are right. What he said.

    I don't know what else I could say. :) Perhaps I could just add
    exclamation points....


    --
    While using is ok, actually /writing/ free software is a disingenuous
    activity. You can afford to write software for free only because of
    someone else somewhere actually paying for it. Just say no.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    HH <hahunt42@hotmail.com> coughed up the following:

    > A wise decision, since tthere often is no way to "fix it" if a BIOS
    > flash goes bad or is interrupted. You are left with a boat anchor or
    > doorstop. Stew said it succinctly "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
    > HH

    Should there be a totally unflashable hardwired uber-bios that takes
    over when the user jumpers a couple pins on the motherboard? Something
    that knows how to further flash a completely munged regular bios?

    Something @#$%s up during a flash. Jumper the pins, and flash again.
    (?)

    Or perhaps, there is an entirely separate hardwired access to the floppy
    drive meant /just/ for flashing purposes. It takes over when someone
    pushes a button on the back and wiggles it a little :). If the bios is
    munged during a flash, flash it again until the thing boots?

    Seems sensible to me.

    --
    While using is ok, actually /writing/ free software is a disingenuous
    activity. You can afford to write software for free only because of
    someone else somewhere actually paying for it. Just say no.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Calgon, take me away!

    Rocky

    "Thomas G. Marshall" <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com>
    wrote in message news:er9pc.30924$vz5.28224@nwrdny01.gnilink.net...
    > HH <hahunt42@hotmail.com> coughed up the following:
    >
    > > A wise decision, since tthere often is no way to "fix it" if a BIOS
    > > flash goes bad or is interrupted. You are left with a boat anchor or
    > > doorstop. Stew said it succinctly "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
    > > HH
    >
    > Should there be a totally unflashable hardwired uber-bios that takes
    > over when the user jumpers a couple pins on the motherboard? Something
    > that knows how to further flash a completely munged regular bios?
    >
    > Something @#$%s up during a flash. Jumper the pins, and flash again.
    > (?)
    >
    > Or perhaps, there is an entirely separate hardwired access to the floppy
    > drive meant /just/ for flashing purposes. It takes over when someone
    > pushes a button on the back and wiggles it a little :). If the bios is
    > munged during a flash, flash it again until the thing boots?
    >
    > Seems sensible to me.
    >
    > --
    > While using is ok, actually /writing/ free software is a disingenuous
    > activity. You can afford to write software for free only because of
    > someone else somewhere actually paying for it. Just say no.
    >
    >
  22. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Aw c'mon I'm serious. What would be so catastrophically difficult about
    it?

    In a world of disaster conscious computer consumers (even grandmothers
    these days know what a "crash" is), it seems like a fairly cheap no
    brainer.


    Rocket J. Squirrel <rocky@bullwinkle.com> coughed up the following:

    > Calgon, take me away!
    >
    > Rocky
    >
    > "Thomas G. Marshall"
    > <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote in
    > message news:er9pc.30924$vz5.28224@nwrdny01.gnilink.net...
    >> HH <hahunt42@hotmail.com> coughed up the following:
    >>
    >>> A wise decision, since tthere often is no way to "fix it" if a BIOS
    >>> flash goes bad or is interrupted. You are left with a boat anchor or
    >>> doorstop. Stew said it succinctly "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
    >>> HH
    >>
    >> Should there be a totally unflashable hardwired uber-bios that takes
    >> over when the user jumpers a couple pins on the motherboard?
    >> Something that knows how to further flash a completely munged
    >> regular bios?
    >>
    >> Something @#$%s up during a flash. Jumper the pins, and flash again.
    >> (?)
    >>
    >> Or perhaps, there is an entirely separate hardwired access to the
    >> floppy drive meant /just/ for flashing purposes. It takes over when
    >> someone pushes a button on the back and wiggles it a little :). If
    >> the bios is munged during a flash, flash it again until the thing
    >> boots?
    >>
    >> Seems sensible to me.
    >>
    >> --
    >> While using is ok, actually /writing/ free software is a disingenuous
    >> activity. You can afford to write software for free only because of
    >> someone else somewhere actually paying for it. Just say no.

    --
    While using is ok, actually /writing/ free software is a disingenuous
    activity. You can afford to write software for free only because of
    someone else somewhere actually paying for it. Just say no.
  23. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Thomas G. Marshall" <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com>
    wrote in message news:9Capc.31038$vz5.28147@nwrdny01.gnilink.net...
    >
    > Aw c'mon I'm serious. What would be so catastrophically difficult about
    > it?
    >
    > In a world of disaster conscious computer consumers (even grandmothers
    > these days know what a "crash" is), it seems like a fairly cheap no
    > brainer.
    >

    <snip>

    Note the dates. I have no idea how EFI is progressing, but this is some
    decent general information:

    http://news.com.com/2100-7337-5131787.html

    http://news.com.com/2100-7339_3-5111993.html?tag=st_rn

    A quick scan of both also seems to show little info. w/regard to recovery if
    at all needed.


    Stew
  24. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Exactly why a BIOS manufacturer lists change or correction
    for each BIOS Revision. The only relevant information freely
    provided by manufacturer and still is not provided. In most
    cases, BIOS changes don't affect the computer user. And so
    again: without that manufacturer's Revision list, then no one
    can rightly recommend a BIOS be upgraded. We can speculate
    that since BIOS correction for something critical rarely
    exist, and since computer boots just fine; then why fix
    (endanger) something that ain't broke. Either get the
    manufacturer's list of what each revision fixes - or leave a
    working computer as is.

    "Thomas G. Marshall" wrote:
    > /WHY/ is being 7 revs behind on the BIOS particularly bad? /IF/
    > the OP doesn't seem to be having problems, then it seems like
    > tempting fate to flash to the latest flavor. If there is
    > something in the BIOS that might be going wrong without him
    > knowing it, say it slows down his system without his knowing it,
    > if you blindly flash routinely you must take into account that
    > the new bios(es) might make it worse.
    >
    > ...[slash]...
  25. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Both Dell and HP/Compaq clearly list the enhancements/fixes that a specific
    BIOS update provides. This also is the case with most motherboard mfgrs, at
    least I've found this to be true with those I've used, including Asus,
    AOpen, Giga-Byte, Epox and Shuttle. As you point out, however, if no such
    info is provided, avoid the update.
    HH


    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:40A5A3DF.CB0B375F@hotmail.com...
    > Exactly why a BIOS manufacturer lists change or correction
    > for each BIOS Revision. The only relevant information freely
    > provided by manufacturer and still is not provided. In most
    > cases, BIOS changes don't affect the computer user. And so
    > again: without that manufacturer's Revision list, then no one
    > can rightly recommend a BIOS be upgraded. We can speculate
    > that since BIOS correction for something critical rarely
    > exist, and since computer boots just fine; then why fix
    > (endanger) something that ain't broke. Either get the
    > manufacturer's list of what each revision fixes - or leave a
    > working computer as is.
    >
    > "Thomas G. Marshall" wrote:
    > > /WHY/ is being 7 revs behind on the BIOS particularly bad? /IF/
    > > the OP doesn't seem to be having problems, then it seems like
    > > tempting fate to flash to the latest flavor. If there is
    > > something in the BIOS that might be going wrong without him
    > > knowing it, say it slows down his system without his knowing it,
    > > if you blindly flash routinely you must take into account that
    > > the new bios(es) might make it worse.
    > >
    > > ...[slash]...
  26. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    w_tom <w_tom1@hotmail.com> coughed up the following:

    > "Thomas G. Marshall" wrote:
    >> /WHY/ is being 7 revs behind on the BIOS particularly bad? /IF/
    >> the OP doesn't seem to be having problems, then it seems like
    >> tempting fate to flash to the latest flavor. If there is
    >> something in the BIOS that might be going wrong without him
    >> knowing it, say it slows down his system without his knowing it,
    >> if you blindly flash routinely you must take into account that
    >> the new bios(es) might make it worse.
    >>
    >> ...[slash]...

    > Exactly why a BIOS manufacturer lists change or correction
    > for each BIOS Revision. The only relevant information freely
    > provided by manufacturer and still is not provided. In most
    > cases, BIOS changes don't affect the computer user. And so
    > again: without that manufacturer's Revision list, then no one
    > can rightly recommend a BIOS be upgraded. We can speculate
    > that since BIOS correction for something critical rarely
    > exist, and since computer boots just fine; then why fix
    > (endanger) something that ain't broke. Either get the
    > manufacturer's list of what each revision fixes - or leave a
    > working computer as is.

    Yep, BUT: feature creep, feature enhancement, bug fixes, whatever you
    call it, is in the territory of the following worries, in order of
    severity:

    1. regression
    2. regression
    3. regression

    I'd consider a

    4. regression

    ....but I'm not sure of it yet. The first three are enough.


    --
    While using is ok, actually /writing/ free software is a disingenuous
    activity. You can afford to write software for free only because of
    someone else somewhere actually paying for it. Just say no.
  27. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    S.Lewis <stew1960@mail.com> coughed up the following:

    > "Thomas G. Marshall"
    > <tgm2tothe10thpower@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com> wrote in
    > message news:9Capc.31038$vz5.28147@nwrdny01.gnilink.net...
    >>
    >> Aw c'mon I'm serious. What would be so catastrophically difficult
    >> about it?
    >>
    >> In a world of disaster conscious computer consumers (even
    >> grandmothers these days know what a "crash" is), it seems like a
    >> fairly cheap no brainer.
    >>
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > Note the dates. I have no idea how EFI is progressing, but this is
    > some decent general information:
    >
    > http://news.com.com/2100-7337-5131787.html
    >
    > http://news.com.com/2100-7339_3-5111993.html?tag=st_rn
    >
    > A quick scan of both also seems to show little info. w/regard to
    > recovery if at all needed.


    I'm not sure I understand the "guts" of EFI.

    So long as any such technology treats what I've been saying as a
    possibility, or perhaps even a "protocol stack" of revisions, such that
    you can easily by jumper roll back whatever, then I'm for it.


    --
    While using is ok, actually /writing/ free software is a disingenuous
    activity. You can afford to write software for free only because of
    someone else somewhere actually paying for it. Just say no.
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