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Need advise from IT professionals/idealists/perfectionsist/ect...

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  • Management
  • Training
  • Book
  • Business Computing
Last response: in Business Computing
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March 14, 2012 4:57:53 AM

As you can see, I am complete with my reading of said book.

My question is...now what.

I have a mom/pop store local to us that has A+ certified techs and I was wondering what I could do to get a job.

Here are my questions:

1) What procedures should I follow/do you recommend to gain employment.
2) I may have an A+ but that does not mean I know everything. Do they offer training, or must I know what do do myself?
3) I am not worried about pay, but if training is offered, can I ask for free training?
4) What should I expect to hear form them?
5) What questions will they ask me to present to them?
6) I do not want to be seen a incompetent, I want to do the job, I want to do it right. I want to be the best IT they have had.

thank You for your time. Please comment.

More about : advise professionals idealists perfectionsist ect

March 15, 2012 4:36:35 PM

One of your biggest things is confidence.

1. Apply of course. Show confidence in your ability. Don't be snobbish about what you already know, show a willingness to learn new things.
2. A+ cert is mainly a foot in the door. Personally, I don't have an A+, but I do have a 4 year degree in IT/Networking. But the A+ is going to give them a baseline to get an idea what you do or don't know.
3. On the job training is probably going to be standard fare. If they offer to send you for more certs, that's probably up to them.
4. Probably expect questions like "Why do you want to work here", or "Why do you feel this field is a good fit for you" "What are your previous experiences." They will probably ask questions like..."describe a time when you had to work on a difficult problem, what did steps did you take to fix it." and also the same type of questions about customers
5. Chat with them. First thing out of your mouth should not be asking what is the pay, that will come out eventually. Ask them about their business, how did they start, what types of work do they see most of the time, etc.

My wife has a saying "fake it till you make it" In other words, if I work on a machine for someone, even if I don't know what's happening yet, I need to confident in front of them to make it look like I know what I'm doing, and 95% of the time, you'll figure it out. But with the employer, be honest, not so honest as to make yourself look stupid, if you apply for an entry level tech job, they know that you are going to have to learn.

If you don't get a job there, you might start out with Geek Squad or a company like that, you just need a foot in somewhere to get experience, and once you get experience, you'll be able to choose more for yourself as you develop connections and get better at IT.
March 15, 2012 4:52:22 PM

Did you take and pass both exams? I couldn't tell from your posting. If you can't get the job you might be able to do some computer repair work at a not-for-profit organization as a volunteer. It's not good pay, but good experience.
Related resources
March 15, 2012 4:55:06 PM

Don't overstate your abilities. Sell your strengths, but don't lie. A lot of people have A+ certifications and are totally incompetent, so you'll need to show what makes you different.

Expect lots of questions about why you want the job, if you care about technology, things like that. If you've built computers before, bring it up. If you know programming languages, bring that up too. Tell them about your long term goals for a career in technology, if you have them.

If you have any computer related side projects, like building a web page, writing a program, learning to program, etc. that you do in your own time, tell them about it. It will show that you're motivated and are genuinely interested in computers.

For the interview, have a few answers to questions you expect rehearsed. You don't need to memorize them (and you'll sound weird if you do), but be familiar with the high points you want to hit. If they ask you why you like computers and you just say "Because they're cool" then they're not going to hire you. If, however, you launch into a quick story about the first time you got to use a computer, and how from that moment on you knew what you wanted to do in life (or something like that), you sound much more interested and you'll win major points.

If you're asked a question to which you don't know the answer, do NOT try to bluff your way through it. The person who asked the question most certainly does know the answer, and you'll come off as if you're dishonest or don't understand the limits of your abilities. Instead, tell them what you do know about the subject. "I don't know" is a perfectly acceptable answer in these cases if you genuinely do not know what they're talking about.

As far as training, I kind of doubt there will be much offered at a mom and pop store. Larger employers would certainly send you through some training course, probably regardless of experience, but that kind of thing just isn't in the budget for shoestring operations.
March 15, 2012 4:59:05 PM

I don't have A+ but i do have job where IT area.

Just remember few thing.

Communication is #1.

Always think and act customer side.

Customers paid ony $20 but they want $2000 of loyalty.

"You earn what you seed."

If you seed (loyalty to customer and good guy at co-works) they will give back to you same.

Of course this is really life. Can't ask for 100% people given back same but it will much better then assss employee (like where DMV ppl, they are suck)

From my exp. Tomshardware ppl are really great with advice but this is just advice.

Where help you to stand front door of career or problems.

Open it or not from there its up you.

Good luck~ !! and i am hoping Welcome to IT business industry


PS. ohiou_grad_06 give you really great advice. It feels like it came from real exp.
March 15, 2012 5:15:44 PM

Add in that the majority of issues you will encounter will likely be new things you've not experienced. In time, they'll become routine. How well you can troubleshoot and quickly determine what the issue is will be important later in your career.

Starting out, understand that you do not know everything and it is very likely you know less than what you think you know. Wait to be proven correct - time will not lie in this field. Given that, expect that you will learn a lot from your co-workers. That is on the job experience and training. When doing A+ kind of work and general troubleshooting, there is not a training course or class you can take to learn it. This is something you develop on your own by having a very clear understanding of how things work.

Be open minded. Listen first. That's key. The younger groups (myself included) are often quick to want to make changes on the fly. People might stand over your shoulder but don't let that bother you. Once you show them you are competent with tasks that are delegated to you, you will be fine.

All that and the other advice being said, the A+ provides a basic understanding of computers. It was probably far more useful back in the 90s and I'm not really sure what all it covers (and why) in today's world of computers. The Cert basically provides the company some security and potential insurance coverage should you really fowl something up. :) 

Go in there and ready to learn and excited about the opportunties that you are given should you get the job.
March 15, 2012 6:13:10 PM

Hi :) 

I own both Computer shops and a Laptop repair company....so I employ a LOT of people like you....

Qualifications dont really matter to me and A+ is useless for building or repairing machines...

What will get you a job with me is EXPERIENCE !

If you have never built some computers ..no job....

All the best Brett :) 
March 16, 2012 1:14:01 AM

Thank you SO much everyone. So much information....I don't know where to begin.

I appreciate all your help.

To answer: No, I have not yet taken the A+ test. For constructing computers: I have disassembled and reassembled a computer many times, and have added and removed hardware, updated software, loaded and OS,etc...

If YOU specifically have any questions, post it here, or PM me.

Much appreciated :) 
March 16, 2012 10:22:32 PM

Question: Should I seek out the potential future employer now, or wait until I passed both tests? What time of year is also most beneficial?
March 17, 2012 12:54:12 AM

I would not wait till summer - when all the kids get out of school, and competion will be bad for entry level slots.
March 17, 2012 4:19:14 AM

frombehind said:
I would not wait till summer - when all the kids get out of school, and competion will be bad for entry level slots.


Okay, then should I seek out the employer now, or take the test ASAP then seek them out?
March 17, 2012 11:40:23 AM

When ready, take the test. Seek employment now and let them know that you are planning on taking the A+ within x amount of time. They may hire you and say you have 30 days to pass the exam or you don't have a job. That's somewhat typical.

Many places might not even care if you have your A+ cert. I never bothered with my A+ and skipped the whole section of computer building. I went to work for a company supporting computers as opposed to a small company dedicated to fixing computers. If you have a solid understanding of troubleshooting and some networking knowledge, you could check into that route as well.
March 17, 2012 11:59:41 AM

Get on linkedin.com. Recruiters use linkedin as a primary device. Network, A LOT. Use Facebook. Google "how to make a resume". Buy a suit, dark colored, single breasted, with a light blue or white shirt and a nite non flamboyant tie. Get a nice haircut. Contact local tech schools and inquire about placement programs they may let you participate in. Don't get discouraged. You will mail out 60 resumes to get 5 interviews to get 1 offer. Like others have said, be confident and reach out to employers you are interested in. Sell yourself that you are an active learner and willing to start at the bottom to prove yourself. Find a headhunter/recruiter. +2 on what the others have said, and good luck!
March 17, 2012 3:54:32 PM

Thank You again everyone!

What should I exactly expect on the tests themselves? I know one is the logistics and the other is Hardware/Software troubleshooting.
March 17, 2012 4:55:29 PM

catatafish said:
Get on linkedin.com. Recruiters use linkedin as a primary device. Network, A LOT. Use Facebook. Google "how to make a resume". Buy a suit, dark colored, single breasted, with a light blue or white shirt and a nite non flamboyant tie. Get a nice haircut. Contact local tech schools and inquire about placement programs they may let you participate in. Don't get discouraged. You will mail out 60 resumes to get 5 interviews to get 1 offer. Like others have said, be confident and reach out to employers you are interested in. Sell yourself that you are an active learner and willing to start at the bottom to prove yourself. Find a headhunter/recruiter. +2 on what the others have said, and good luck!



Yup. Unfortunatelly for those that are just starting out, a certain fact becomes painfully obvious very quickly: Most of the time, Its not WHAT you know, its WHO you know.
March 17, 2012 6:03:47 PM

Definitely true. I'm 31, and used to work for a local school system, and now work as an IT admin for an international Church organization. I feel like in my area I am connected with more influential people than many others my age, and later on those help you. When I finally moved to where I am, I had 3 letters of recommendation from the schools. I know guys that are A+ certified that might be good techs, but are not good with customers. You gotta be able to be a people person, not be intimidated, but also be good at what you do. You make mistakes, just learn from them. Certs are great, but they are only your foot in a door.

But as others said, experience is a great teacher. I got my Bachelors degree but most stuff that I know I know because I had to sit down and fight things and figure them out. You are always learning.

Andy, thanks for the compliment. But confident, get some experience and you are fine. If you are confident and don't get the job, maybe put a small ad in the local paper and do side jobs to get experience. The company may hire you to keep you from eventually getting bigger and cutting into their bottom line.
March 17, 2012 8:51:56 PM

Reality check though. Economy is bad and there are a ton of people out there who can do basic computer work. IT unemployment is sitting between 2-3% nationwide - this is really good. Those with a skillset that want to work are working in their field.

Bad part: A lot of people are transitioning over to do the entry level tech work. The field is broader and there are a lot of people there. Any recent grad or people seeking work are finding this to be a big issue when getting their foot in the door.

Good part: Stick with it, build your skillset. It won't come overnight. I've been actively employed in the field for nearly 13 years and I would say the most significant portion of my skillset came in the last 5 years - meaning my first 8 years in the field I would have considered my skillset 'common' and with a long list of other people with my qualifications. Stick with it.. because when the economy tanks again (and it will) you will be in a great position to stay employed or find a better job while others are standing in the unemployment line.
March 17, 2012 9:46:04 PM

Okay, so if I do not get this job at the store, where else can I get my foot in the door. Other places mentioned,( like Geek Squad, or other basic tech systems such as that,) are more than 1 hour away from where I am.

Basically, how else...besides doing an ad...can I find a place to start. I cannot think of anywhere off the top of my head that 'needs' an entry leveled no experience technician.
March 18, 2012 12:17:17 AM

I really dont know if this is an option for you or not... but the military always takes people who have no experience and can pass the basic medical and physical standards. If you go into a communications-related field, this will also grant you a security clearence of at least some basic level. After you do your time, thats not only gauranteed work experience - but the clearence is a quick ticket to "goverment related" IT work. Most such jobs pay well into 6 figures, and it more then doubles your market when you are looking for work.
March 18, 2012 3:33:11 AM

Surely there are places in the next town?

I can definitely see where riser is coming from. Like where I work, I love my job, but may get outsourced. That said, I stay because I had a hard time finding this job, and it might be more of a drive but it's rewarding, and I am getting so much experience. I do entry level work such as pc repair, etc. But I also do all the server backups, server checks, have gotten to reinstall Windows Server on a couple of boxes, getting experiences like that is great because I never got to do those things before. The more you can learn the better off you are. But as I said, if you can't get in there, consider running an ad, lots of guys do it on craigslist, you'd be suprised how easy virus and spyware removal can be. Note, it's not always, but you will definitely get a challenge learning. I personally find I learn simply by just doing things. I have my 4 year degree, but most things I know, I have learned by just sitting down with things and learning.
March 21, 2012 5:44:13 AM

Thanks guys.

One last question...Should I be clean shaven for a first impression? :D 

What should I say/do to impress them?
March 21, 2012 1:07:21 PM

Depends on the person. Always be clean shaven I would say. Sometimes a suit is appropriate, but for that, I would say wear nice black casual style shoes, khakis and a button up shirt.
March 21, 2012 5:17:33 PM

You should *always* be clean shaven. This really isn't optional. You'll see some people who aren't but that's why he's 40 years old and still a monkey wrenching on computers instead of moving up. :) 

Be polite, listen first before speaking, and don't be afraid to say "I don't know, I would have research it." Part of being a tech is that you don't always have the answer and will need to research the issue. Look around the forum.. that's what this place is all about.

If you have a suit, wear it. If you don't, a polo with khakis or a dress pant would be fine. A shirt, tie, and pants with appropriate shoes would be ideal.
March 23, 2012 4:12:45 AM

More Questions! Yippee!

1. What should I expect on both tests? How easy is it really? What should I brace myself for? Should I sweat passing it?

2. What should I exactly know before getting this job? I do not want to come off as knowledgeable and have them expect me to know how to do something to alter fire me. That is what scares me: They hire me and expect me to know how to do something and not being able to do it,( I lack what many IT's have.) I do not want to come off as incompetent either.


March 23, 2012 1:29:19 PM

1. Can't answer that, never went for my A+, by the time I got my degree and experience, figured A+ was not needed.

2. I think you are mainly going to need general knowledge. If they look at your resume and see that you don't have much experience, they will know that you need training, there are lots of little tricks to each type of equipment that you learn over time. Much of what you will need to know will come only through experience in my opinion.
March 23, 2012 2:41:33 PM

I have my A+, I found that the tests are pretty straightforward. If you read the book, did some practice tests, read the book again then you will most likely have no troubles with the test.

As for getting a job, I found that almost all mom and pop shops were not hiring in my area. I did as a previous poster recommended and posted an ad on craigslist and various other places offering my services to both small businesses and to individuals. During this time I got my Network+, so keep moving with the certifications. I eventually got hired at a small IT firm in the area and worked there for about a year, however my school schedule really cut into my time and I had to leave the company. I now work for Geek Squad and have been there for 7 months.

As others have said on the job experience outdoes reading a book everyday of the week. Even freelance work shows you are committed to the field and gives actual work experience. If you cant find a job at a local shop, what about working for the school system, even if it was as a volunteer, it is a great way to learn and get experience.

Hope this helps.
March 23, 2012 3:01:44 PM

dog -
I am so disappointed in the fact that you know I'm certified and have gave you links a long time ago, you not PM me.?
c'mon man bro.....
we've been through that before.

as for the technical aspect, have confidence in your skills and ability.
if you are like me you have learned a lot being in forums and especially on Tom's over the years so use your common sense.
just think and re-read any questions in your head before you verbally answer.

anyways.
presentation of yourself is key.
first impression, phone and in-person.
appearance, smile, firm handshake, eye contact.

need more detailed tips for actual interviewing, PM me.
wish you best of luck.

mal~
CompTIA A+, Net+, MCDST, DSCE (Dell)
March 23, 2012 3:40:52 PM

verbalizer said:
dog -
I am so disappointed in the fact that you know I'm certified and have gave you links a long time ago, you not PM me.?
c'mon man bro.....
we've been through that before.

as for the technical aspect, have confidence in your skills and ability.
if you are like me you have learned a lot being in forums and especially on Tom's over the years so use your common sense.
just think and re-read any questions in your head before you verbally answer.

anyways.
presentation of yourself is key.
first impression, phone and in-person.
appearance, smile, firm handshake, eye contact.

need more detailed tips for actual interviewing, PM me.
wish you best of luck.

mal~
CompTIA A+, Net+, MCDST, DSCE (Dell)


Dude, I'm sorry! I totally forgot! :??: 

thanks for the heads up, and taking time to respond. I just feel like I need to get as much info as I possibly can. going around the forum is not something I should be doing, but I feel strong about this.

Stupid dogman...you make me look bad! :pfff: 
March 23, 2012 4:09:49 PM

Currently working at the NHS; used to work for the dreaded DSGI technical help call centre......in all honesty having the A+ cert is great but alot of companies seem to disregard it if your just entering into the industry.

Key tip, apply for everything even, you will likely end up in a service desk style senario, this is where you do a hell of a lot of work and get paid penuts. Once you have a few years under your belt start aiming higher.....higher up you get less work you do and more you get paid ......but its "harder work" *cough*
March 23, 2012 6:39:52 PM

Are any of these certificates available in the uk? I mean are they american or sort of universal to the industry? If so, where?
March 23, 2012 6:55:28 PM

You can, I believe, obtain an A+ in the UK.

It is a certification that demonstrates your abilities of understanding how a computer operates,and how to perform basic troubleshooting of any issues that may arise.

You can go to a local junior college or university and see if they offer the class. Also, there are literature that is available,( such as the case of the book I am currently/already reading/read.)

I must advise you...the certification must be renewed every three years now.
March 23, 2012 7:22:17 PM

Glad to see you are back, hope it all works out for you.
March 23, 2012 7:31:03 PM

I do not have a certification of any kind and my resume is riddled with retail management and telco network installation jobs. All of my experience is as a home PC builder/business network installer on the side. I'm just like you, no cert. I got the job on pure merit: I went into the interview while at the top of my game, but it was like any other interview I have taken or have conducted. Any interviewer just wants clear, concise answers that show you know what you're talking about.

You won't know everything. Some of the interview questions will stump you, because more than likely whoever's interviewing you has ages of experience long beyond your abilities so whatever you do, do NOT make things up just to make it seem like you know the answer. Be honest. Don't be afraid to stumble, either, but pick back up quickly: they have seen your resume and know your background isn't IT. I missed a few basic answers and recuperated by asking what the answer was and, if I knew it, delved into the functionality of the answer to show my understanding of it. It's like getting a free answer-change on a hard test, take it.

Handle it like any other interview-

Dress the part: If the IT guys wear polo's and khakis, that's what you need to be wearing for the interview because when I conducted interviews for retailers I marked off for people coming in wearing suits and ties when all store employees wore t-shirts and shorts. Doing this shows existing knowledge of your surroundings, 90% of interviewers respect that.

Don't be afraid to ask questions if you don't understand or want to know something about the organization. A good chunk of IT is research because strange problems occur a lot of the time and not everyone knows every answer or has encountered every issue. Admitting that you can ask questions to determine the correct course of action is the best thing you can do to prove you can handle the position.

Also, 35% of any interview is your questions for the interviewer, and this can make or break your entire effort. If you go in, answer all their questions and don't have some good ones of your own they're probably going to trash your application. Granted, most of your questions will be job-detail- or environment-oriented but employers like to know that you understand what you're getting into.

Be confident in your own abilities, but be pliable to new ways and new information. Don't say "I don't know everything" because they already know that. I don't know everything, but I have learned a lot. I find answers if I don't know them, and that's always the best thing you can do.

I could go on for hours, I am sorry. My management gear kicked in and wanted to help :) 
March 23, 2012 7:43:18 PM

Okay, I see what people are saying and I respect that.

I seem to still be stumped on the fact of they know I am new, but why ask questions I don't know just to get me? Or the fact that even if I do not know the answer, should I fake it or should I say 'I don' know,' because those are the two only options I can see...unless I need to do some research on the issue.

March 23, 2012 7:48:53 PM

By the way, most of the questions they will ask are going to be directly related to what they do on a daily basis. It might be good to go talk to some of the people up there prior to going through the interview. Find out what they do, make sure your knowledge base fits what they do. If not, do some research. When it's time for the interview and the question pertaining to something you don't completely understand comes around, tell them that you haven't personally handled it but you've talked to some of their employees and you've started reading up on it to be prepared for the job. That will certainly score you major points.

As far as free training goes, they'll teach you what you don't know and usually reteach you some things you already to know so that you'll conform to their way of doing the job. Everyone has their own method, and as a good employee you're going to bend to theirs.

Since they're a mom-and-pop store they're more than likely not handling a ton of large-business stuff so the things you've done yourself will have given a general overview of the knowledge set needed for A+ certification and they know that. A+ isn't even a foot in the door right now since there's so many kids coming right out of college, sans certification, ready for jobs and their skill set is beyond A+ already. My career path normally requires MCSE/MCSA and a CNNA but the knowledge I've amassed just through hobbyist/enthusiast networking and PC construction could easily allow me to ace those exams. You're not dealing with that level of requirement, just show that you know your way around a computer inside and out.

Employers are looking for knowledgeable, pliable and teachable employees. This is true from big business to mom-and-pop shops. Certifications and degrees can make a difference, but if you talk to the right people before the interview and follow through after getting one you can get the job, even without the piece of paper.
March 23, 2012 7:52:10 PM

Always, in an interview, say that you don't know the answer if you don't know it. Just make sure you say you'll find out (and go home and do just that) or, if you know they don't mind, ask them right then and there. Show that you're willing to learn, it'll get you points with a lot of interviewers.

And job-pertaining questions are asked of everyone, it's not to "get you" but it's more to gauge your level of knowledge. Like I said before, though, prove you can learn better than their other candidates and you've already taken a major step.


Edit: IT is, at least a good bit, all about work ethic. If you prove that you'll work harder than the next guy, they'll hire you. How do you do that in words? I've given you the basics in everything that I've said from dressing the part to telling them you don't know. You can take it from there.
March 23, 2012 7:58:29 PM

So, even if I do not know certain things they ask, they will see it as where I am placed on a spectrum of IT knowledge and what they may want me to work one for future work?
March 23, 2012 8:00:17 PM

Yes! I can admit that I don't know everything about my job, my boss has heard me say that plenty of times both in my interview and while working with me. I always back it up with a "I'll find out." We are all students, just do the interview and show them where you stand but make sure they know that you can learn better than others.

I'm out for the day, I'll check back again tomorrow :) 
March 23, 2012 8:06:43 PM

Thank you everyone. You have been so much help.
March 23, 2012 10:47:24 PM

I forgot to say, research the company, know what they do, how long in business, everything you can find. When I got my first IT job in the school system, my now former boss liked the fact that I knew so much about the school system when I interviewed. It makes them feel like you care about what they care about, and that can be a difference between you and someone with more experience who does not care.
April 3, 2012 9:35:19 PM

dogman_1234 said:
So, even if I do not know certain things they ask, they will see it as where I am placed on a spectrum of IT knowledge and what they may want me to work one for future work?


I knew a guy that was interviewing for a high up, helping the CEO type job of a very large company. They put him in a room with a dozen people staring at him. They dumped a box of various computer cables in front of him. He said there were well over 30 different cables, many he had never seen before.

This was his final interview and only test:

Identify each cable, provide the specs for each cable, and explain what it does.

"I don't know" was not an acceptable answer in this case.
The end result was to put extreme pressure on him to see how he handled the situation.

A previous interview I had, I was asked a question and answered it correctly. I was told that I was correct, but there was another factor in the issue that I was missing.

One. Hour. Went. By.

I exhausted all questions, all troubleshooting steps, I was done. I didn't know.

The interviewer laughed. It wasn't a technical question. It was a question based on personality and thought process. I had to detail all steps involved in my troubleshooting process, asking the questions, receiving information, continuously troubleshooting the issue, until I was at the end of my skillset. I was an experienced engineer and I had gave proof through that interview that I knew exactly what I was doing and how much I knew.

So when you look at what questions are being asked of you, saying "I don't know" early without exhausting your skillset may show a lack of depth. But you are new and therefore that is expected. What they are digging for is for you to show them your depth of knowledge even though you're green. I've met many people who have had years of experience that didn't know squat about basic stuff. I've worked with people who didn't have any experience but had more knowledge about it than others.
April 3, 2012 9:48:51 PM

riser said:
I knew a guy that was interviewing for a high up, helping the CEO type job of a very large company. They put him in a room with a dozen people staring at him. They dumped a box of various computer cables in front of him. He said there were well over 30 different cables, many he had never seen before.

This was his final interview and only test:

Identify each cable, provide the specs for each cable, and explain what it does.

"I don't know" was not an acceptable answer in this case.
The end result was to put extreme pressure on him to see how he handled the situation.

A previous interview I had, I was asked a question and answered it correctly. I was told that I was correct, but there was another factor in the issue that I was missing.

One. Hour. Went. By.

I exhausted all questions, all troubleshooting steps, I was done. I didn't know.

The interviewer laughed. It wasn't a technical question. It was a question based on personality and thought process. I had to detail all steps involved in my troubleshooting process, asking the questions, receiving information, continuously troubleshooting the issue, until I was at the end of my skillset. I was an experienced engineer and I had gave proof through that interview that I knew exactly what I was doing and how much I knew.

So when you look at what questions are being asked of you, saying "I don't know" early without exhausting your skillset may show a lack of depth. But you are new and therefore that is expected. What they are digging for is for you to show them your depth of knowledge even though you're green. I've met many people who have had years of experience that didn't know squat about basic stuff. I've worked with people who didn't have any experience but had more knowledge about it than others.


:??: 

Well...

This is really getting to me. I see both, " I can do it," and "I have no capacity to do such thing. Why bother make yourself out like a fool in front of professionals!"

I appreciate your responses riser.

Is it true riser is a name of a type of daughterboard one puts into PCI slots?
April 3, 2012 10:08:52 PM

dogman_1234 said:
:??: 

Well...

This is really getting to me. I see both, " I can do it," and "I have no capacity to do such thing. Why bother make yourself out like a fool in front of professionals!"

I appreciate your responses riser.

Is it true riser is a name of a type of daughterboard one puts into PCI slots?

yes.
April 3, 2012 10:09:48 PM

I couldn't resist...
(my apologies)
April 4, 2012 12:12:03 AM

verbalizer said:
I couldn't resist...
(my apologies)


Thanks.

Don't feel bad giving the correct answer. I was just noting his username and had to recall what it was.
April 4, 2012 12:01:05 PM

Yeah, Riser being the name of a daugher board but this user name doesn't come from that concept.

No one ever really caught on assuming that but the name is more of a cypher than anything else.
April 4, 2012 7:50:11 PM

Cypher? As in a code?
April 4, 2012 8:18:00 PM

cypher
The process of tapping into your subconscious. A state of mind where thoughts and actions flow from your mind rather than being instrumented.

riser
As a adjective.
1. Advancing, ascending, or mounting.
2. Growing or advancing to adult years.




April 4, 2012 8:48:20 PM

all good comments here.

A trend in IT is lack of confidence when your first job in the field. Learn to expect that 95% of your knowledge and abilities is going to come from your job, not your education. Your entire career is based on attacking problems that you know nothing about and have absolutely no clue how to solve. Be confident and jump into it. Make sure you always give an answer, even if its "i don't know, but i'll find out".

Don't bullshit, just be efficient and know how to solve problems are you'll be fine.
April 5, 2012 12:59:51 PM

Cypher as in an older, basic code where letters were switched about. If you shift certain letters another name is revealed.. that kind of cypher.

But you'd only know it if you had other information available, which you don't, so the cypher means nothing with that other key. :) 
!