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Using Drive Image with XP?

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Anonymous
September 2, 2005 3:26:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Following a major crash my wife had a second 40GB HD installed
recently. Unfortunately, the installer took the simplest option of
making the whole new drive a single partition, instead of two of 8GB
and 32GB, identical to the other drive. The organisation is therefore
now as follows:
HD1
---
C 40GB:Win XP Home SP2, programs and all data

HD2
---
F 8GB: Empty
G 32GB: Nightly backups of all data and settings from C

That's obviously more secure than before, but I'd like to go further.
I want to use DriveImage 2002 to copy the OS to F, so that in an
emergency we could boot up to that instead of C. But DI won't allow
that. Even though C contains only a TOTAL of about 7GB, and F is 8GB,
it says there is insufficient space.

It's been a long time since I last used DI, and I'm nervous about how
best to proceed at minimum risk. Can I achieve my aim by using the
facilities under Disk Operations to 'Redistribute free space among
partitions'? Relatively risk free? Hate to think of the marital
consequences of wiping WinXP! <g>

Any advice would be much appreciated please.

Terry, UK

More about : drive image

Anonymous
September 2, 2005 3:26:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

D.I. requires a partition that is equal to, or larger than, the source
partition.

You can use Partition Magic to shrink the 40 gig partition on your new
drive, down to the exact same size (or a tad less) than the 8 gig partition
on your second drive. You can then create a new partition in the freed up
space on your new drive.

Then, copy your system partition over to your second drive with Drive Image.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
news:q3agh1d14t3teoncjnbn5fpllvh55k55l7@4ax.com...
> Following a major crash my wife had a second 40GB HD installed
> recently. Unfortunately, the installer took the simplest option of
> making the whole new drive a single partition, instead of two of 8GB
> and 32GB, identical to the other drive. The organisation is therefore
> now as follows:
> HD1
> ---
> C 40GB:Win XP Home SP2, programs and all data
>
> HD2
> ---
> F 8GB: Empty
> G 32GB: Nightly backups of all data and settings from C
>
> That's obviously more secure than before, but I'd like to go further.
> I want to use DriveImage 2002 to copy the OS to F, so that in an
> emergency we could boot up to that instead of C. But DI won't allow
> that. Even though C contains only a TOTAL of about 7GB, and F is 8GB,
> it says there is insufficient space.
>
> It's been a long time since I last used DI, and I'm nervous about how
> best to proceed at minimum risk. Can I achieve my aim by using the
> facilities under Disk Operations to 'Redistribute free space among
> partitions'? Relatively risk free? Hate to think of the marital
> consequences of wiping WinXP! <g>
>
> Any advice would be much appreciated please.
>
> Terry, UK
>
>
Anonymous
September 2, 2005 3:26:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Just keep doing what you're doing.
Assuming you have the space, save an image of C: to G:.
When C: fails, put in the DI boot diskettes and restore the image to F:.
Pull the first hard drive out of the system and replace it with the 2nd hard
drive. Course all this drive lettering will change when booting from the DI
diskettes, even before restoring.

Copying takes forever. Don't waste your time on this for regular backups of
C: Imaging is faster and more likely to boot properly when restored.
"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
news:q3agh1d14t3teoncjnbn5fpllvh55k55l7@4ax.com...
> Following a major crash my wife had a second 40GB HD installed
> recently. Unfortunately, the installer took the simplest option of
> making the whole new drive a single partition, instead of two of 8GB
> and 32GB, identical to the other drive. The organisation is therefore
> now as follows:
> HD1
> ---
> C 40GB:Win XP Home SP2, programs and all data
>
> HD2
> ---
> F 8GB: Empty
> G 32GB: Nightly backups of all data and settings from C
>
> That's obviously more secure than before, but I'd like to go further.
> I want to use DriveImage 2002 to copy the OS to F, so that in an
> emergency we could boot up to that instead of C. But DI won't allow
> that. Even though C contains only a TOTAL of about 7GB, and F is 8GB,
> it says there is insufficient space.
>
> It's been a long time since I last used DI, and I'm nervous about how
> best to proceed at minimum risk. Can I achieve my aim by using the
> facilities under Disk Operations to 'Redistribute free space among
> partitions'? Relatively risk free? Hate to think of the marital
> consequences of wiping WinXP! <g>
>
> Any advice would be much appreciated please.
>
> Terry, UK
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
September 2, 2005 6:32:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote:

>Just keep doing what you're doing.
>Assuming you have the space, save an image of C: to G:.
>When C: fails, put in the DI boot diskettes and restore the image to F:.
>Pull the first hard drive out of the system and replace it with the 2nd hard
>drive. Course all this drive lettering will change when booting from the DI
>diskettes, even before restoring.
>
>Copying takes forever. Don't waste your time on this for regular backups of
>C: Imaging is faster and more likely to boot properly when restored.

Thanks, appreciate your advice. However, I have already also made an
image of C on G:. (Took a fair while, containing all the data as it
does.) So I do have that restore option if necessary, if C: is still
accessible.

But the attractions of making a *copy* are
- I can immediately test it, at no risk, unlike restoring a set of PQI
image files.
- We can use the PC even if C: is inaccessible, whether due to
hardware or OS, etc.

So I just want to know if I can temporarily resize C: safely, so that
DI will let me copy it to E: Then I can resize C: back up to 40GB
again. From my subsequent study, it looks as if I *can* do this. But
it would be reassuring to hear from more experienced DI users before I
press on!

Note that I don't intend to do this copy as a regular backup. After
much effort, we now have all the programs my wife uses on a regular
basis. Not much will change form now on. If, heaven forbid, we had
another disaster in a year from now, I reckon she would be able to
boot into E: and be instantly familiar with the environment.

Maybe this should have been a separate post but... it hasn't increased
my confidence that DI just failed on *my* PC! While doing that long
image creation on my wife's PC, I decided I'd do a run on my own
system. My setup is:

HD1
---
C 12GB: Win XP Home SP1
D 44GB: All programs and data

HD2
---
E 12GB: Copy of WinXP made years ago
F 44GB: Backups

It started OK, rebooted itself to 'Caldera DOS', and after half an
hour I left it chuntering away at a slow 47MB/min. (The wife's image
was going at 145MB/min.) But while having lunch, about an hour into
the run, I heard sound of my PC rebooting prematurely. On returning, I
found E: had vanished. I recreated it with XP Disk Manage, but of
course it's now empty ;-(

I had run chkdsk /f on both C: and E: befoe running DI. And no
messages were displayed by DI before it crashed. So I'm at a loss to
know what might have caused this failure. Any ideas anyone please?

Terry, UK
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 2:36:25 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Richard Urban [MVP]" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%23M3mK46rFHA.4044@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> D.I. requires a partition that is equal to, or larger than, the source
> partition.

Mmh. Not quite. DI requires a partition equal to about 50%
of the used space on drive C:, depending on the compression
that can be achieved. If 10 GBytes are used on a 40 GByte
disk then a separate drive of about 5 GBytes is needed. In
most cases, 6 GBytes will suffice.

>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Richard Urban
> Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User
>
> Quote from: George Ankner
> "If you knew as much as you thought you know,
> You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"
>
> "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
> news:q3agh1d14t3teoncjnbn5fpllvh55k55l7@4ax.com...
> > Following a major crash my wife had a second 40GB HD installed
> > recently. Unfortunately, the installer took the simplest option of
> > making the whole new drive a single partition, instead of two of 8GB
> > and 32GB, identical to the other drive. The organisation is therefore
> > now as follows:
> > HD1
> > ---
> > C 40GB:Win XP Home SP2, programs and all data
> >
> > HD2
> > ---
> > F 8GB: Empty
> > G 32GB: Nightly backups of all data and settings from C
> >
> > That's obviously more secure than before, but I'd like to go further.
> > I want to use DriveImage 2002 to copy the OS to F, so that in an
> > emergency we could boot up to that instead of C. But DI won't allow
> > that. Even though C contains only a TOTAL of about 7GB, and F is 8GB,
> > it says there is insufficient space.
> >
> > It's been a long time since I last used DI, and I'm nervous about how
> > best to proceed at minimum risk. Can I achieve my aim by using the
> > facilities under Disk Operations to 'Redistribute free space among
> > partitions'? Relatively risk free? Hate to think of the marital
> > consequences of wiping WinXP! <g>
> >
> > Any advice would be much appreciated please.
> >
> > Terry, UK
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 2:38:34 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Please ignore my previous post - I failed to read the OP's
post properly.


"Richard Urban [MVP]" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%23M3mK46rFHA.4044@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> D.I. requires a partition that is equal to, or larger than, the source
> partition.
>
> You can use Partition Magic to shrink the 40 gig partition on your new
> drive, down to the exact same size (or a tad less) than the 8 gig
partition
> on your second drive. You can then create a new partition in the freed up
> space on your new drive.
>
> Then, copy your system partition over to your second drive with Drive
Image.
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Richard Urban
> Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User
>
> Quote from: George Ankner
> "If you knew as much as you thought you know,
> You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"
>
> "Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
> news:q3agh1d14t3teoncjnbn5fpllvh55k55l7@4ax.com...
> > Following a major crash my wife had a second 40GB HD installed
> > recently. Unfortunately, the installer took the simplest option of
> > making the whole new drive a single partition, instead of two of 8GB
> > and 32GB, identical to the other drive. The organisation is therefore
> > now as follows:
> > HD1
> > ---
> > C 40GB:Win XP Home SP2, programs and all data
> >
> > HD2
> > ---
> > F 8GB: Empty
> > G 32GB: Nightly backups of all data and settings from C
> >
> > That's obviously more secure than before, but I'd like to go further.
> > I want to use DriveImage 2002 to copy the OS to F, so that in an
> > emergency we could boot up to that instead of C. But DI won't allow
> > that. Even though C contains only a TOTAL of about 7GB, and F is 8GB,
> > it says there is insufficient space.
> >
> > It's been a long time since I last used DI, and I'm nervous about how
> > best to proceed at minimum risk. Can I achieve my aim by using the
> > facilities under Disk Operations to 'Redistribute free space among
> > partitions'? Relatively risk free? Hate to think of the marital
> > consequences of wiping WinXP! <g>
> >
> > Any advice would be much appreciated please.
> >
> > Terry, UK
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 2:54:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
news:q3agh1d14t3teoncjnbn5fpllvh55k55l7@4ax.com...
> Following a major crash my wife had a second 40GB HD installed
> recently. Unfortunately, the installer took the simplest option of
> making the whole new drive a single partition, instead of two of 8GB
> and 32GB, identical to the other drive. The organisation is therefore
> now as follows:
> HD1
> ---
> C 40GB:Win XP Home SP2, programs and all data
>
> HD2
> ---
> F 8GB: Empty
> G 32GB: Nightly backups of all data and settings from C
>
> That's obviously more secure than before, but I'd like to go further.
> I want to use DriveImage 2002 to copy the OS to F, so that in an
> emergency we could boot up to that instead of C. But DI won't allow
> that. Even though C contains only a TOTAL of about 7GB, and F is 8GB,
> it says there is insufficient space.
>
> It's been a long time since I last used DI, and I'm nervous about how
> best to proceed at minimum risk. Can I achieve my aim by using the
> facilities under Disk Operations to 'Redistribute free space among
> partitions'? Relatively risk free? Hate to think of the marital
> consequences of wiping WinXP! <g>
>
> Any advice would be much appreciated please.
>
> Terry, UK

There is no absolute certainty in life. Most of my partition
manipulations are successful but I do get the odd spectacular
failure. I suggest you do this once every six months:
- Use DI to create a compressed image file of drive C:.
Park it on drive G:.
- Disconnect the first disk.
- Use the DI Recovery Disk to restore the compressed image
file to what was drive F:.
- See if you can boot from the second disk (Do NOT
connect the first disk!)
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 2:54:05 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Pegasus \(MVP\)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote:

>
>"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
>news:q3agh1d14t3teoncjnbn5fpllvh55k55l7@4ax.com...
>> Following a major crash my wife had a second 40GB HD installed
>> recently. Unfortunately, the installer took the simplest option of
>> making the whole new drive a single partition, instead of two of 8GB
>> and 32GB, identical to the other drive. The organisation is therefore
>> now as follows:
>> HD1
>> ---
>> C 40GB:Win XP Home SP2, programs and all data
>>
>> HD2
>> ---
>> F 8GB: Empty
>> G 32GB: Nightly backups of all data and settings from C
>>
>> That's obviously more secure than before, but I'd like to go further.
>> I want to use DriveImage 2002 to copy the OS to F, so that in an
>> emergency we could boot up to that instead of C. But DI won't allow
>> that. Even though C contains only a TOTAL of about 7GB, and F is 8GB,
>> it says there is insufficient space.
>>
>> It's been a long time since I last used DI, and I'm nervous about how
>> best to proceed at minimum risk. Can I achieve my aim by using the
>> facilities under Disk Operations to 'Redistribute free space among
>> partitions'? Relatively risk free? Hate to think of the marital
>> consequences of wiping WinXP! <g>
>>
>> Any advice would be much appreciated please.
>>
>> Terry, UK
>
>There is no absolute certainty in life. Most of my partition
>manipulations are successful but I do get the odd spectacular
>failure. I suggest you do this once every six months:
>- Use DI to create a compressed image file of drive C:.
> Park it on drive G:.
>- Disconnect the first disk.
>- Use the DI Recovery Disk to restore the compressed image
> file to what was drive F:.
>- See if you can boot from the second disk (Do NOT
> connect the first disk!)
>

Thanks for the reply. But please see my reply to Lil' Dave.

Have you/anyone here actually done a resize with DI of the sort I
described please?

BTW, even for regular backup (which is not what my enquiry is about) I
would prefer an approach that didn't require getting inside the PC.
Especially as conditions are very cramped in my wife's office.

Terry, UK
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 3:53:00 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
news:f5lgh11snccb2vu1hc6s58jjsfcq7i9v1b@4ax.com...
> "Pegasus \(MVP\)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
> >news:q3agh1d14t3teoncjnbn5fpllvh55k55l7@4ax.com...
> >> Following a major crash my wife had a second 40GB HD installed
> >> recently. Unfortunately, the installer took the simplest option of
> >> making the whole new drive a single partition, instead of two of 8GB
> >> and 32GB, identical to the other drive. The organisation is therefore
> >> now as follows:
> >> HD1
> >> ---
> >> C 40GB:Win XP Home SP2, programs and all data
> >>
> >> HD2
> >> ---
> >> F 8GB: Empty
> >> G 32GB: Nightly backups of all data and settings from C
> >>
> >> That's obviously more secure than before, but I'd like to go further.
> >> I want to use DriveImage 2002 to copy the OS to F, so that in an
> >> emergency we could boot up to that instead of C. But DI won't allow
> >> that. Even though C contains only a TOTAL of about 7GB, and F is 8GB,
> >> it says there is insufficient space.
> >>
> >> It's been a long time since I last used DI, and I'm nervous about how
> >> best to proceed at minimum risk. Can I achieve my aim by using the
> >> facilities under Disk Operations to 'Redistribute free space among
> >> partitions'? Relatively risk free? Hate to think of the marital
> >> consequences of wiping WinXP! <g>
> >>
> >> Any advice would be much appreciated please.
> >>
> >> Terry, UK
> >
> >There is no absolute certainty in life. Most of my partition
> >manipulations are successful but I do get the odd spectacular
> >failure. I suggest you do this once every six months:
> >- Use DI to create a compressed image file of drive C:.
> > Park it on drive G:.
> >- Disconnect the first disk.
> >- Use the DI Recovery Disk to restore the compressed image
> > file to what was drive F:.
> >- See if you can boot from the second disk (Do NOT
> > connect the first disk!)
> >
>
> Thanks for the reply. But please see my reply to Lil' Dave.
>
> Have you/anyone here actually done a resize with DI of the sort I
> described please?
>
> BTW, even for regular backup (which is not what my enquiry is about) I
> would prefer an approach that didn't require getting inside the PC.
> Especially as conditions are very cramped in my wife's office.
>
> Terry, UK

Out of principle, I never use internal disks for backups,
regular or otherwise. In my opinion, doing so defeats part
of the purpose of having a dependable backup. These
days I use an external disk in a USB enclosure. No need
to get inside the PC, completely detached storage.
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 7:47:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

For anyone else that ends up here with similar query, happy to report
the following approach proved successful:

1) Copied C:\Documents and Settings\Janet\My Documents to
G:\C-MyDocs\My Documents to reduce size of C: by about 3GB, and
provide another backup in addition to one made automatically last
night of entire C:\Documents and Settings.

2) Installed PM 7.0 and made Rescue Diskettes. (I'd previously done
chkdsk on C: and G:) 

3) With PM, resized 38GB C: partition to about 8GB. That was the step
I was most nervous about, but it went smoothly. (Note that I could
*not* do this in DI as I'd thought earlier.)

4) Used Drive Image 2002 to Copy Drive C: to F: That took a long time
but again went well.

5) Was then able to dual boot as desired!

6) Used PM 7 to resize C: back up to 38GB

7) Copied G:\C-MyDocs\My Documents back to C:\Documents and
Settings\Janet

---------

The only glitch was that somehow both versions of XP (on C: and F:) 
now identified the special folder 'My Documents' as being
G:\C-MyDocs\My Documents. So various programs Open/Save interfaces
were now misleading and irritating. Took a while to stumble on the
cure: from Start, r-click My Documents and in Properties use the Move
option to re-specify C:\Documents and Settings\Janet. (I'd be
interested if anyone can explain why that issue arose please.)

On testing the alternative boot, I'd forgotten about the 'active'
partition apparently always getting called C:, so it came as a
surprise that C: and F: were reversed <g>.

So that's a nice friendly environment on tap immediately should she
ever have another disaster with the other HD.

--
Terry, West Sussex, UK
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 7:47:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Glad all went well.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
news:gqdjh1l54tfd1nsum1vauj7vp45usr1klt@4ax.com...
> For anyone else that ends up here with similar query, happy to report
> the following approach proved successful:
>
> 1) Copied C:\Documents and Settings\Janet\My Documents to
> G:\C-MyDocs\My Documents to reduce size of C: by about 3GB, and
> provide another backup in addition to one made automatically last
> night of entire C:\Documents and Settings.
>
> 2) Installed PM 7.0 and made Rescue Diskettes. (I'd previously done
> chkdsk on C: and G:) 
>
> 3) With PM, resized 38GB C: partition to about 8GB. That was the step
> I was most nervous about, but it went smoothly. (Note that I could
> *not* do this in DI as I'd thought earlier.)
>
> 4) Used Drive Image 2002 to Copy Drive C: to F: That took a long time
> but again went well.
>
> 5) Was then able to dual boot as desired!
>
> 6) Used PM 7 to resize C: back up to 38GB
>
> 7) Copied G:\C-MyDocs\My Documents back to C:\Documents and
> Settings\Janet
>
> ---------
>
> The only glitch was that somehow both versions of XP (on C: and F:) 
> now identified the special folder 'My Documents' as being
> G:\C-MyDocs\My Documents. So various programs Open/Save interfaces
> were now misleading and irritating. Took a while to stumble on the
> cure: from Start, r-click My Documents and in Properties use the Move
> option to re-specify C:\Documents and Settings\Janet. (I'd be
> interested if anyone can explain why that issue arose please.)
>
> On testing the alternative boot, I'd forgotten about the 'active'
> partition apparently always getting called C:, so it came as a
> surprise that C: and F: were reversed <g>.
>
> So that's a nice friendly environment on tap immediately should she
> ever have another disaster with the other HD.
>
> --
> Terry, West Sussex, UK
Anonymous
September 4, 2005 9:49:19 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Okay, you already have an image. Why can't you just restore that instead of
copying????????????????

P.S. Ghost 9.0 and the former DI 7.0 are alot faster because 1. you don't
have to reboot, 2. Windows access to another partition or hard drive is not
limited to slower disk access in dos like DI 6.0 relies on when imaging the
boot partition. 3. If enabled, DMA can provide almost dual like access
during reads/writes, not available in dos.

"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
news:spjgh1ho2udu22l4d1d91l8h50sp0dvufj@4ax.com...
> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote:
>
> >Just keep doing what you're doing.
> >Assuming you have the space, save an image of C: to G:.
> >When C: fails, put in the DI boot diskettes and restore the image to F:.
> >Pull the first hard drive out of the system and replace it with the 2nd
hard
> >drive. Course all this drive lettering will change when booting from the
DI
> >diskettes, even before restoring.
> >
> >Copying takes forever. Don't waste your time on this for regular backups
of
> >C: Imaging is faster and more likely to boot properly when restored.
>
> Thanks, appreciate your advice. However, I have already also made an
> image of C on G:. (Took a fair while, containing all the data as it
> does.) So I do have that restore option if necessary, if C: is still
> accessible.
>
> But the attractions of making a *copy* are
> - I can immediately test it, at no risk, unlike restoring a set of PQI
> image files.
> - We can use the PC even if C: is inaccessible, whether due to
> hardware or OS, etc.
>
> So I just want to know if I can temporarily resize C: safely, so that
> DI will let me copy it to E: Then I can resize C: back up to 40GB
> again. From my subsequent study, it looks as if I *can* do this. But
> it would be reassuring to hear from more experienced DI users before I
> press on!
>
> Note that I don't intend to do this copy as a regular backup. After
> much effort, we now have all the programs my wife uses on a regular
> basis. Not much will change form now on. If, heaven forbid, we had
> another disaster in a year from now, I reckon she would be able to
> boot into E: and be instantly familiar with the environment.
>
> Maybe this should have been a separate post but... it hasn't increased
> my confidence that DI just failed on *my* PC! While doing that long
> image creation on my wife's PC, I decided I'd do a run on my own
> system. My setup is:
>
> HD1
> ---
> C 12GB: Win XP Home SP1
> D 44GB: All programs and data
>
> HD2
> ---
> E 12GB: Copy of WinXP made years ago
> F 44GB: Backups
>
> It started OK, rebooted itself to 'Caldera DOS', and after half an
> hour I left it chuntering away at a slow 47MB/min. (The wife's image
> was going at 145MB/min.) But while having lunch, about an hour into
> the run, I heard sound of my PC rebooting prematurely. On returning, I
> found E: had vanished. I recreated it with XP Disk Manage, but of
> course it's now empty ;-(
>
> I had run chkdsk /f on both C: and E: befoe running DI. And no
> messages were displayed by DI before it crashed. So I'm at a loss to
> know what might have caused this failure. Any ideas anyone please?
>
> Terry, UK
Anonymous
September 5, 2005 2:22:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote:

>Okay, you already have an image. Why can't you just restore that instead of
>copying????????????????
>
>P.S. Ghost 9.0 and the former DI 7.0 are alot faster because 1. you don't
>have to reboot, 2. Windows access to another partition or hard drive is not
>limited to slower disk access in dos like DI 6.0 relies on when imaging the
>boot partition. 3. If enabled, DMA can provide almost dual like access
>during reads/writes, not available in dos.
>
>"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
>news:spjgh1ho2udu22l4d1d91l8h50sp0dvufj@4ax.com...
>> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote:
>>
>> >Just keep doing what you're doing.
>> >Assuming you have the space, save an image of C: to G:.
>> >When C: fails, put in the DI boot diskettes and restore the image to F:.
>> >Pull the first hard drive out of the system and replace it with the 2nd
>hard
>> >drive. Course all this drive lettering will change when booting from the
>DI
>> >diskettes, even before restoring.
>> >
>> >Copying takes forever. Don't waste your time on this for regular backups
>of
>> >C: Imaging is faster and more likely to boot properly when restored.
>>
>> Thanks, appreciate your advice. However, I have already also made an
>> image of C on G:. (Took a fair while, containing all the data as it
>> does.) So I do have that restore option if necessary, if C: is still
>> accessible.
>>
>> But the attractions of making a *copy* are
>> - I can immediately test it, at no risk, unlike restoring a set of PQI
>> image files.
>> - We can use the PC even if C: is inaccessible, whether due to
>> hardware or OS, etc.
>>
>> So I just want to know if I can temporarily resize C: safely, so that
>> DI will let me copy it to E: Then I can resize C: back up to 40GB
>> again. From my subsequent study, it looks as if I *can* do this. But
>> it would be reassuring to hear from more experienced DI users before I
>> press on!
>>
>> Note that I don't intend to do this copy as a regular backup. After
>> much effort, we now have all the programs my wife uses on a regular
>> basis. Not much will change form now on. If, heaven forbid, we had
>> another disaster in a year from now, I reckon she would be able to
>> boot into E: and be instantly familiar with the environment.
>>
>> Maybe this should have been a separate post but... it hasn't increased
>> my confidence that DI just failed on *my* PC! While doing that long
>> image creation on my wife's PC, I decided I'd do a run on my own
>> system. My setup is:
>>
>> HD1
>> ---
>> C 12GB: Win XP Home SP1
>> D 44GB: All programs and data
>>
>> HD2
>> ---
>> E 12GB: Copy of WinXP made years ago
>> F 44GB: Backups
>>
>> It started OK, rebooted itself to 'Caldera DOS', and after half an
>> hour I left it chuntering away at a slow 47MB/min. (The wife's image
>> was going at 145MB/min.) But while having lunch, about an hour into
>> the run, I heard sound of my PC rebooting prematurely. On returning, I
>> found E: had vanished. I recreated it with XP Disk Manage, but of
>> course it's now empty ;-(
>>
>> I had run chkdsk /f on both C: and E: befoe running DI. And no
>> messages were displayed by DI before it crashed. So I'm at a loss to
>> know what might have caused this failure. Any ideas anyone please?
>>
>> Terry, UK
>

I don't think you can have read my post! As I said:
"But the attractions of making a *copy* are
- I can immediately test it, at no risk, unlike restoring a set of PQI
image files."

The reason for making the image (first) was to provide *additional*
backup. But it's *untested*. You're seriously suggesting I wipe out an
existing well-running OS just to test whether, if I ever need to do so
in earnest in the future, it will work?! Get serious <g>.

--
Terry, West Sussex, UK
Anonymous
September 5, 2005 2:22:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

Terry,

Whenever I used Drive Image 7.01, and now Ghost 9, to create/verify an
image - I have never failed to be able to restore that image. The important
step is the "VERIFY" as part of the create process. Believe me, if the
program didn't do what it was stated to be able to do, it would have been
yanked off the market years ago.

The only times I have seen problems is when there are drive errors. This
will cause the imaging program to error out during the creation process.
Easy fix! Run chkdsk with the /f switch before you create the image. The
imaging program is not going to allow you to create an image of a partition
that it "knows" is logically corrupt to begin with.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
news:o b3oh1l6lfit4ki2827h3538qf6mjj0o7r@4ax.com...
> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote:
>
>>Okay, you already have an image. Why can't you just restore that instead
>>of
>>copying????????????????
>>
>>P.S. Ghost 9.0 and the former DI 7.0 are alot faster because 1. you don't
>>have to reboot, 2. Windows access to another partition or hard drive is
>>not
>>limited to slower disk access in dos like DI 6.0 relies on when imaging
>>the
>>boot partition. 3. If enabled, DMA can provide almost dual like access
>>during reads/writes, not available in dos.
>>
>>"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
>>news:spjgh1ho2udu22l4d1d91l8h50sp0dvufj@4ax.com...
>>> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote:
>>>
>>> >Just keep doing what you're doing.
>>> >Assuming you have the space, save an image of C: to G:.
>>> >When C: fails, put in the DI boot diskettes and restore the image to
>>> >F:.
>>> >Pull the first hard drive out of the system and replace it with the 2nd
>>hard
>>> >drive. Course all this drive lettering will change when booting from
>>> >the
>>DI
>>> >diskettes, even before restoring.
>>> >
>>> >Copying takes forever. Don't waste your time on this for regular
>>> >backups
>>of
>>> >C: Imaging is faster and more likely to boot properly when restored.
>>>
>>> Thanks, appreciate your advice. However, I have already also made an
>>> image of C on G:. (Took a fair while, containing all the data as it
>>> does.) So I do have that restore option if necessary, if C: is still
>>> accessible.
>>>
>>> But the attractions of making a *copy* are
>>> - I can immediately test it, at no risk, unlike restoring a set of PQI
>>> image files.
>>> - We can use the PC even if C: is inaccessible, whether due to
>>> hardware or OS, etc.
>>>
>>> So I just want to know if I can temporarily resize C: safely, so that
>>> DI will let me copy it to E: Then I can resize C: back up to 40GB
>>> again. From my subsequent study, it looks as if I *can* do this. But
>>> it would be reassuring to hear from more experienced DI users before I
>>> press on!
>>>
>>> Note that I don't intend to do this copy as a regular backup. After
>>> much effort, we now have all the programs my wife uses on a regular
>>> basis. Not much will change form now on. If, heaven forbid, we had
>>> another disaster in a year from now, I reckon she would be able to
>>> boot into E: and be instantly familiar with the environment.
>>>
>>> Maybe this should have been a separate post but... it hasn't increased
>>> my confidence that DI just failed on *my* PC! While doing that long
>>> image creation on my wife's PC, I decided I'd do a run on my own
>>> system. My setup is:
>>>
>>> HD1
>>> ---
>>> C 12GB: Win XP Home SP1
>>> D 44GB: All programs and data
>>>
>>> HD2
>>> ---
>>> E 12GB: Copy of WinXP made years ago
>>> F 44GB: Backups
>>>
>>> It started OK, rebooted itself to 'Caldera DOS', and after half an
>>> hour I left it chuntering away at a slow 47MB/min. (The wife's image
>>> was going at 145MB/min.) But while having lunch, about an hour into
>>> the run, I heard sound of my PC rebooting prematurely. On returning, I
>>> found E: had vanished. I recreated it with XP Disk Manage, but of
>>> course it's now empty ;-(
>>>
>>> I had run chkdsk /f on both C: and E: befoe running DI. And no
>>> messages were displayed by DI before it crashed. So I'm at a loss to
>>> know what might have caused this failure. Any ideas anyone please?
>>>
>>> Terry, UK
>>
>
> I don't think you can have read my post! As I said:
> "But the attractions of making a *copy* are
> - I can immediately test it, at no risk, unlike restoring a set of PQI
> image files."
>
> The reason for making the image (first) was to provide *additional*
> backup. But it's *untested*. You're seriously suggesting I wipe out an
> existing well-running OS just to test whether, if I ever need to do so
> in earnest in the future, it will work?! Get serious <g>.
>
> --
> Terry, West Sussex, UK
>
Anonymous
September 5, 2005 7:11:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

"Richard Urban [MVP]" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Terry,
>
>Whenever I used Drive Image 7.01, and now Ghost 9, to create/verify an
>image - I have never failed to be able to restore that image. The important
>step is the "VERIFY" as part of the create process. Believe me, if the
>program didn't do what it was stated to be able to do, it would have been
>yanked off the market years ago.
>
>The only times I have seen problems is when there are drive errors. This
>will cause the imaging program to error out during the creation process.
>Easy fix! Run chkdsk with the /f switch before you create the image. The
>imaging program is not going to allow you to create an image of a partition
>that it "knows" is logically corrupt to begin with.

Well, OK, that is somewhat reassuring, thanks. But there's still that
slight unknown risk! For instance, what about the effect of some
hardware change in the months (or years) before the image has to be
used?

By contrast, I was *immediately* able to test the OS copy.
Psychologically at least, you have to admit there's no contest!


--
Terry, West Sussex, UK
Anonymous
September 5, 2005 7:11:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

OK. So you immediately test the copy. Then you put it away for "years", as
you say. In the interim you have added much hardware and changed hardware
settings. Do you think that your "copy" would be any better than an image if
you have problems with your current setup?

--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"Terry Pinnell" <terrypinDELETE@THESEdial.pipex.com> wrote in message
news:44koh19p6j81l029sq015vbs7b13ehsum5@4ax.com...
> "Richard Urban [MVP]" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>Terry,
>>
>>Whenever I used Drive Image 7.01, and now Ghost 9, to create/verify an
>>image - I have never failed to be able to restore that image. The
>>important
>>step is the "VERIFY" as part of the create process. Believe me, if the
>>program didn't do what it was stated to be able to do, it would have been
>>yanked off the market years ago.
>>
>>The only times I have seen problems is when there are drive errors. This
>>will cause the imaging program to error out during the creation process.
>>Easy fix! Run chkdsk with the /f switch before you create the image. The
>>imaging program is not going to allow you to create an image of a
>>partition
>>that it "knows" is logically corrupt to begin with.
>
> Well, OK, that is somewhat reassuring, thanks. But there's still that
> slight unknown risk! For instance, what about the effect of some
> hardware change in the months (or years) before the image has to be
> used?
>
> By contrast, I was *immediately* able to test the OS copy.
> Psychologically at least, you have to admit there's no contest!
>
>
> --
> Terry, West Sussex, UK
!