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Windows update - Kernel-Mode Driver Framework version 1.11 failed

Last response: in Windows 7
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November 15, 2012 1:49:08 PM

I have a new build using Windows 7 HP SP1 64-bit which has been up and running for about a month. MS updates for 11/14/12 included the Kernel-Mode Driver Framework version 1.11 for Win 7. This update failed to install (several times), even when done alone. First time since building system where it has failed an update. Only thing I have added since original build is a EVGA GTX 650 video card (last week). Anyone else experience this problem or know what the error code below indicates?

November 15, 2012 10:53:43 PM

OK, I fixed the problem. Turns out that because I was storing the System and User Temp files on a RAM drive the update could not install because the path to the Temp folder was invalid. When I disabled storing the Temp files on the RAM drive the update installed without incident.

A bit of surprise to me as I never knew that some of the Windows Update files use temp storage when installing.
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a b α HP
a b $ Windows 7
November 16, 2012 12:18:47 AM

highcountryrider said:
OK, I fixed the problem. Turns out that because I was storing the System and User Temp files on a RAM drive the update could not install because the path to the Temp folder was invalid. When I disabled storing the Temp files on the RAM drive the update installed without incident.

A bit of surprise to me as I never knew that some of the Windows Update files use temp storage when installing.


RAM drives are stupid for exactly this reason. Operating systems are designed with certain file consistency constraints in place and RAM drives violate almost all of these while offering very little benefit.
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November 16, 2012 12:59:06 AM

Yeah, I'm just experimenting with a RAM drive for the first time but starting to see the drawbacks. Another of those..."well, it looked good on paper." moments. :ouch: 
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a b α HP
a b $ Windows 7
November 16, 2012 1:51:27 PM

highcountryrider said:
Yeah, I'm just experimenting with a RAM drive for the first time but starting to see the drawbacks. Another of those..."well, it looked good on paper." moments. :ouch: 


Windows already uses any uncommitted physical memory as a page cache, so it's kinda silly to have a RAM disk do the exact same thing. Windows is better at it, trust me.
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November 16, 2012 9:16:14 PM

Pinhedd said:
Windows already uses any uncommitted physical memory as a page cache, so it's kinda silly to have a RAM disk do the exact same thing. Windows is better at it, trust me.

Well, one of the considerations was to not have Windows create a 16 GB (equal to amount of installed RAM) pagefile on my system SSD. Although the SSD is 256 GB (now down to 200 GB) reducing it a further 16 GB seemed unnecessary. What I'm thinking of doing is creating a 800 MB pagefile on the system drive (to handle crash reports, BSOD, etc.) and putting a 4 GB pagefile on the E drive (secondary HDD). That leaves me just about 11 GB free memory on the OS drive and should be fine for my usage needs. I've never come close to using 8 GB; don't do games, video editing. etc.
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a b α HP
a b $ Windows 7
November 17, 2012 2:11:31 AM

highcountryrider said:
Well, one of the considerations was to not have Windows create a 16 GB (equal to amount of installed RAM) pagefile on my system SSD. Although the SSD is 256 GB (now down to 200 GB) reducing it a further 16 GB seemed unnecessary. What I'm thinking of doing is creating a 800 MB pagefile on the system drive (to handle crash reports, BSOD, etc.) and putting a 4 GB pagefile on the E drive (secondary HDD). That leaves me just about 11 GB free memory on the OS drive and should be fine for my usage needs. I've never come close to using 8 GB; don't do games, video editing. etc.


1GB on the system disk is always good idea.
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November 17, 2012 3:03:16 AM

OK, thanks for the suggestion. First time using a SSD so trying to follow the recommendations I've researched to optimize performance and to extend longevity by limiting writes to the SSD. Bit of a learning curve.
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a b α HP
a b $ Windows 7
November 17, 2012 4:25:42 AM

highcountryrider said:
OK, thanks for the suggestion. First time using a SSD so trying to follow the recommendations I've researched to optimize performance and to extend longevity by limiting writes to the SSD. Bit of a learning curve.


Most of those recommendations are either unnecessary, circumstantial, or downright dangerous. Windows Vista SP1+, Windows 7, and Windows 8 already do a very good job of configuring themselves when installed to an SSD. The only things that you need to do to tune performance for an SSD are:

1. Update the drive firmware. This is very important and should be the first thing that you do. If possible, do this with a Linux LiveCD and then nuke the drive contents with the ATA secure erase function (PartedMagic can do this) so that the drive is at factory defaults, but with the new firmware. Finally, install the OS.

2. Update the motherboard firmware to the latest revision. Firmware updates for the Southbridge SATA port controllers are sometimes included in this package.

3. Update your system storage drivers to the latest Intel Rapid Storage Technology / Rapid Storage Technology Enterprise drivers, or their AMD equivalent.

That's it. The rest is best left alone. There are a few things that you can do to tweak storage as well though:

1. Reduce or disable the page file on the SSD. As stated already, it is best to leave at least 1GB for fast crash dumps.

2. Disable system restore.

3. Disable the recycling bin on that drive. Please keep in mind that when a file is deleted on an SSD that has TRIM support it may be permanently deleted and unrecoverable. If you're prone to accidentally deleting stuff, leave the recycling bin on!
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November 17, 2012 1:21:17 PM

I had already done pretty much what your recommendations list. SSD had latest firmware, Updated all MB drivers and BIOS, using latest IRST drivers. I have disabled system restore, disc defrag, hibernation/sleep and drive indexing. I've also disabled prefetch and super prefetch, which are Samsung recommendations. Think I'll leave the Recycle Bin alone as I am, unfortunately, somewhat prone to radical file cleanup and deletion! :ouch: 

Appreciate the advice.
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a b α HP
a b $ Windows 7
November 17, 2012 8:40:40 PM

highcountryrider said:
I had already done pretty much what your recommendations list. SSD had latest firmware, Updated all MB drivers and BIOS, using latest IRST drivers. I have disabled system restore, disc defrag, hibernation/sleep and drive indexing. I've also disabled prefetch and super prefetch, which are Samsung recommendations. Think I'll leave the Recycle Bin alone as I am, unfortunately, somewhat prone to radical file cleanup and deletion! :ouch: 

Appreciate the advice.


There's no reason to disable prefetch and superfetch. Those are the tools that take unused system memory and use it to cache commonly used stuff.
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