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Palm Os versus Pocket PC

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November 22, 2004 12:41:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

I have been a Palm OS user for at least 5 years now. I am about to
renew my Sony Clie and I am currently undecided whether to go for an
HP IPAQ or stick to a Palm OS. I noted that the Pocket PC has recently
gained a lot of grounds on the Palm OS in terms of sale figures. Is
this anything to go by???? I would appreciate any views on the matter.
What are the pros & cons of both OS? Hope to hear from you guys as I
intend to offer myself one for Xmas...... Thanks Robert

More about : palm versus pocket

Anonymous
November 22, 2004 12:41:12 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 21:41:11 +0400, Harry <harrysmith03@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>I would appreciate any views on the matter.
>What are the pros & cons of both OS?

I was just considering the same change. My reason was because Palm
never seems to quite "hit home" with the feature set in their devices.
Look at - for example - the Dell Axim x50v. Includes 802.11 *and*
Bluetooth, 128MB of RAM, etc etc. Palm just put out the T5 and it has
*NO* 802.11...!! And the T|C after over a year in the market still
has NO Bluetooth.. :-/

But after talking to one of my long-time associates she *still* hates
CE/Win Mobile devices. She just recently got a Win Mobile device with
an XScale 400 CPU in it. She said they're obscenely slow (Win Moble
is apparently still a pig), have very short battery life and crash at
least once a day. She tried one for a week and tossed it back in it's
box - never to see the light of day again.

Her *exact* words to me were; "If the day ever comes where CE is the
only choice for a PDA OS I'm going back to a Franklin Planner."
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 2:25:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

It was a time of great turmoil. The strong preyed on the weak, dogs
and cats lived together. One voice cried out in the wilderness: Harry
<harrysmith03@hotmail.com> wrote in
<4mk1q05u2vjln2qet34n6hasnsq0nc9jk8@4ax.com>:

> I have been a Palm OS user for at least 5 years now. I am about to
> renew my Sony Clie and I am currently undecided whether to go for an
> HP IPAQ or stick to a Palm OS. I noted that the Pocket PC has recently
> gained a lot of grounds on the Palm OS in terms of sale figures. Is
> this anything to go by????

Yes and no.

The main reason that PocketPCs are "outselling" PalmOS devices is the
popularity of the Treo 600, which because it's a cell phone is not
counted in handheld sales statistics even though it is believed to
have accounted for over half of PalmOne's sales last year. When you
arbitrarily remove half a million units from a company's sales
figures, it's going to look bad even when it's still in good shape.

On the other hand, there's a reason for the Treo 600's popularity.
PalmOne is really concentrating on the cell phone market. As a result,
you can probably expect most of its handhelds to be in the mid-level
range like the Tungsten 5. If you can't live without Wi-fi, Palm's
only integrated solution is the year-old Tungsten C. You can pay extra
for an SD card that will add Wi-fi to your Palm device but most
PocketPCs have it built in as a standard feature.

Other than that one big ace in the hole, PocketPCs don't have many
advantages. They're getting smaller but the smallest Palms are smaller
than the smallest PocketPCs. There are models with huge, beautiful VGA
screens but they cost much more than even the most expensive Palms and
most PocketPCs still come with 320x240 screens -- giving you 25% fewer
pixels than the typical modern Palm which costs less than $200
American. And if you want a PDA/cell phone, no Microsoft solution can
match the Treo 600.

So if you want Wi-fi and multimedia, get a PocketPC. If you want a
PDA/cell phone, get a Palm (Treo). If you just want multimedia get a
Palm. If you just want a good PDA, get a Palm.

--
Roberto Castillo
robertocastillo@ameritech.net
http://www.freewebs.com/robertocastillo/
Related resources
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 8:46:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Harry wrote:

> I have been a Palm OS user for at least 5 years now. I am about to
> renew my Sony Clie and I am currently undecided whether to go for an
> HP IPAQ or stick to a Palm OS. I noted that the Pocket PC has recently
> gained a lot of grounds on the Palm OS in terms of sale figures. Is
> this anything to go by???? I would appreciate any views on the matter.
> What are the pros & cons of both OS? Hope to hear from you guys as I
> intend to offer myself one for Xmas...... Thanks Robert

I am strongly against PPC, but I will try to give you an honest advice.

Pocket PC is intended to provide a Window$ environment -- a environment that
most people are accustomed to. Whether or no Window$ is a good environment
for work, well, that's a matter of personal preference. One guy in UseNet
called PPC 'mini-Window$' and I believe he was quite correct.

Palm was made to suit the organisational and professional needs of people on
the move. There are many arguments that support it, e.g. comparably small
dimensions, quick navigation and data durability.

I sometimes find myself sitting in front of a powerful PC and yet spending
half an hour working on my Palm, not the keyboard and the mouse. This comes
to prove that different platforms suit different needs.

--
Roy Schestowitz
http://schestowitz.com
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 11:06:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Zombie Elvis" <DELETE-ME-2-REPLY-robertocastillo@ameritech.net> wrote in
message
SNIP
>
> Other than that one big ace in the hole, PocketPCs don't have many
> advantages. They're getting smaller but the smallest Palms are smaller
> than the smallest PocketPCs. There are models with huge, beautiful VGA
> screens but they cost much more than even the most expensive Palms and
> most PocketPCs still come with 320x240 screens -- giving you 25% fewer
> pixels than the typical modern Palm which costs less than $200
> American. And if you want a PDA/cell phone, no Microsoft solution can
> match the Treo 600.
>

Most Palms with 320x320 screens cost more than $200. The TE is the only one
that I know of that is under $200 at $199. Also, the smallest Palm units are
the Zire 31 and 21 at 4.4 x 2.9 x .6 where as the HP 4155 is 4.47 x 2.78 x
..5, a very tiny bit smaller.

As for Treo, I think there are some Win CE phones out that are very close if
not better than the Treo 600 and even the 650. My associate has a new
Motoroal smartphone that is much more compact than the Treo, has decently
sized number buttons and overall is a nice unit.

I am a Palm user and fan, but I feel that Palm is loosing ground to PPC and
Win CE smart phones.

TC
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 11:06:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <I5hod.1987$uV6.459@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
"Tony Clark" <curiousgeorge1964@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Most Palms with 320x320 screens cost more than $200. The TE is the only one
> that I know of that is under $200 at $199.

Only a fool would pay $199. Palm is selling them with a 128 Meg SD card
and $50 off if you trade in your old Palm. I've seen open box specials
for $150. Blemished for less. You have touched on just one of the
reasons the TE is so popular. Great screen with all of the most needed
features at a great price. No frivolous high-end techie stuff like
built in camera, bluetooth, etc.

Regards,

-Doug
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 6:38:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Doug Hoffman" <dhoffman@journey.com> wrote in message
news:D hoffman-624C09.04531022112004@news.chatlink.com...
> In article <I5hod.1987$uV6.459@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
> "Tony Clark" <curiousgeorge1964@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Most Palms with 320x320 screens cost more than $200. The TE is the only
>> one
>> that I know of that is under $200 at $199.
>
> Only a fool would pay $199. Palm is selling them with a 128 Meg SD card
> and $50 off if you trade in your old Palm. I've seen open box specials
> for $150. Blemished for less. You have touched on just one of the
> reasons the TE is so popular. Great screen with all of the most needed
> features at a great price. No frivolous high-end techie stuff like
> built in camera, bluetooth, etc.
>
Good point. I was simply refering to list pricing and not including any
deals that Palm may throw at you. The real point to my comment was that
there are not that many Palm units that have a hi-rez screen for under $200.

I'd disagree that Bluetooth is a frivolous feature. I use it all the time
with my T3. It's quite handy for synching, connecting to the net via my PC
and soon I will use it to connect to a GPS device. If the TE had BT and
still sold for $199 (list) I believe that it would be even more popular.

TC
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 8:52:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <4mk1q05u2vjln2qet34n6hasnsq0nc9jk8@4ax.com>, Harry
<harrysmith03@hotmail.com> wrote:

> I have been a Palm OS user for at least 5 years now. I am about to
> renew my Sony Clie and I am currently undecided whether to go for an
> HP IPAQ or stick to a Palm OS. I noted that the Pocket PC has recently
> gained a lot of grounds on the Palm OS in terms of sale figures. Is
> this anything to go by???? I would appreciate any views on the matter.
> What are the pros & cons of both OS? Hope to hear from you guys as I
> intend to offer myself one for Xmas...... Thanks Robert

Better or worse depends on what you need the device for.

The sales figures you refer to are for one quarter only, in the U.S. It is
true that PalmOne seems to be focusing on smartphones rather than PDAs and
that the PDA market is flat.

It's also true that WinCE Mobile works more like a PC with all the
attendant installation and troubleshooting issues. It still takes more
clicks to do many common things than the Palm OS and so is less
"efficient." It is not as compatible with Microsoft Office as the Palm OS
running Documents To Go.

As for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth in one device, do you need them? It all goes
back to what you do with a PDA. Good luck.
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 10:16:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Sunday, Harry wrote:

> What are the pros & cons of both OS?

Well - I have some experience here. I stared out my PDA life with a
Palm Pro which ended up dropped and so replaced with a IIIx. I used
that for around two years I think, and then replaced it with a Sony
Clie.

Then I got a new job and instead of a laptop (which I knew I would
not use), they gave me an iPAQ (3650 I think - old, slow and far
too big to want to carry around). Left that job, took up my Clie for
a while and was then tempted by the Bluetooth in the iPAQ's, so sold
the Clie, bought an iPAQ 1940 and used that for almost a year.

Now I've sold the iPAQ and my mobile and have replaced them both
with a Treo600 that I got on Ebay.

What I like about PocketPC is the sync software. I know that there's
a lt of people who have trouble with it, but I honestly never had a
single problem that was caused by it. Why I like it is the background
sync of everything - if an appointment is changed on the dekstop then
it is changed on the handheld at the same time - there's no need to
remember to do a sync before leaving the desk. I have on a couple of
occasions forgotten to sync the Palm and have therefore left the
desk without the latest info.

I like the fact that pocket PC uses a "real" file system.

I think that there's more professional software out there for the
PocketPC. This is just my expereience, but although there may be a
lot fewer applcations for PocketPC, those that are seem to be more
finished and "polished" than a lot of Palm stuff. People say that
there are 10,000 or more applications for Palm. I would guess that
8,000 of those are done by bedroom programmers and are not really
finished. Just my opinion, is all.

What I like about Palm....everything really. I honestly have not a
single problem with the current Palm range.

What I don't like about PocketPC.....there's a lot of off things
happening with the file system. Although it looks like a normal
windows system, it's not easy to build a directory structure as
the built-in apps only like to see files stored in "My Documents"
and won't look elsewhere.

The software is expensive, but as I said before, seems to be of
better quality.

They DO need resetting every couple of hours. I guess it's not a
major problem but there's ALWAYS the risk that the next reset may
be the one that loses data.

The Word and Excel facilities are trumpetted about, but you have
to really ask yourself whether you WILL want to work on documents
like these with a handheld? I NEVER did and wouldn't even have
noticed if Pocket Word and Excel had not been installed.

Some people have said that PocketPC's tend to get put into the
desktop cradle and rarely, leave whereas Palm's tend to get used
as PDAs. I think this could work with both operating systems to
be honest - I found that my Clie and my iPAQ were both left at
home in the cradle for the simple fact that I got fed up with
carrying around two devices - mobile phone and PDA. The only way
I solved that was by getting a combined unit. I then looked at
the options and at the moment, simply due to device size and the
way the phone and PDA are integrated, the Treo beat all of the
PocketPC phone/PDA devices hands-down.

As they stand, both PocketPC and PalmOS do good jobs as PDA's,
but both do fairly awful jobs at taking your documents out with
you. Both are great for diary, contacts, mobile email, games,
mp3's, lists, etc and anything you get now will certainly still
be useful long after the case is battered and the screen is
scratched and you need a new unit.

But - I am not sure, myself, about the future of PalmOS devices
simply due to the lack of innovation in the OS and ths standard
apps. My Treo has, apart from the phone apps, basically the
same software as my orginal Palm Pro. The lack of development
in the standard apps has led me to purchase Agendus as a diary
replacement and other software to replace the build in memopad
and so on. In fact, apart from the phone app, there's no Palm
software that I use really - it's all third-party.

Microsoft have the funds to throw at developing applications
and they WILL take over the PDA market unless Palm does some-
thing soon, of that I am sure.

Sorry about the length of this....I got carried away!

--
Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk>
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 10:22:36 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Monday, Tony Clark wrote:

> I'd disagree that Bluetooth is a frivolous feature.

I'd disagree with your disagreement ;-)

> I use it all the time with my T3.

I don't miss it at all with my Treo.

> It's quite handy for synching

Why would I want to sync via BT when the Treo is in the cradle
anyway to charge it? My iPAQ had BT and I thought it'd be great
to sync with a cradle. But the I realised that the thing would
need to be in the cradle to charge anyway, so why not syc via
the cable?

I suppose iit *might* be useful to sync via BT and then leave
the cradle on the bedside table to charge overnight....

> connecting to the net via my PC

Why? Why would you connect your Palm to the net when you have
a desktop PC within 10m of the Palm? The tiny screens make web
browsing pointless apart from in an emergency.

> and soon I will use it to connect to a GPS device.

Granted - one of the two uses I can see for BT.

The other would be to print direct to a BT enabled printer. It
would be so nice if all higher-end printers had BT built in,
and I could then print notes for a client, in their office, from
my handheld direct to their own printer.

Apart from that, I don't miss or feel I need, Bluetooth at all.

--
Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk>
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 10:22:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <1re4q0l9br5h3gimechendiik87idihf4m@4ax.com>,
Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk> wrote:

> On Monday, Tony Clark wrote:
>
> > I'd disagree that Bluetooth is a frivolous feature.
>
> I'd disagree with your disagreement ;-)
>
> > I use it all the time with my T3.
>
> I don't miss it at all with my Treo.
>
> > It's quite handy for synching
>
> Why would I want to sync via BT when the Treo is in the cradle
> anyway to charge it? My iPAQ had BT and I thought it'd be great
> to sync with a cradle. But the I realised that the thing would
> need to be in the cradle to charge anyway, so why not syc via
> the cable?
>
> I suppose iit *might* be useful to sync via BT and then leave
> the cradle on the bedside table to charge overnight....
>
> > connecting to the net via my PC
>
> Why? Why would you connect your Palm to the net when you have
> a desktop PC within 10m of the Palm? The tiny screens make web
> browsing pointless apart from in an emergency.
>
> > and soon I will use it to connect to a GPS device.
>
> Granted - one of the two uses I can see for BT.

My m125 connects quite nicely to a GPS. No BT. While I haven't tried
it, I know that a GPS unit is available for the TE (no BT required).
But the monochrome display of the m125 is far superior in bright
outdoors light where I use the GPS (in my glider). The TE screen is
barely readable there.


> The other would be to print direct to a BT enabled printer. It
> would be so nice if all higher-end printers had BT built in,
> and I could then print notes for a client, in their office, from
> my handheld direct to their own printer.

Lots of things would be "nice". But are you willing to pay the big
bucks for that?

Again, the trick of the TE is it gives the features most people need
and/or are willing to pay for. Currently stuff like BT is out of the
mainstream, both in price and demand. But that could surely change some
day.

Regards,

-Doug


> Apart from that, I don't miss or feel I need, Bluetooth at all.
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 10:38:01 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Tony Clark" <curiousgeorge1964@hotmail.com> wrote:

> If the TE had BT and still sold for $199 (list)
> I believe that it would be even more popular.

Really? And if it also came with 1 Meg of RAM and sold for $149 it
would be even more popular.

And if... (a world of ifs to live in)

Regards,

-Doug
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 10:45:18 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

I wrote:

> And if it also came with 1 Meg of RAM and sold for $149 it
> would be even more popular.

Of course I meant at least 256 Meg. Oh what the heck, make 1 Gig!

Regards,

-Doug
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 2:01:21 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <7tc4q0ln4t2i9un1sd356vedcoeriddbpn@4ax.com>, Bryan Anderson
<usenet@bryananderson.co.uk> wrote:

> What I like about PocketPC is the sync software. I know that there's
> a lt of people who have trouble with it, but I honestly never had a
> single problem that was caused by it. Why I like it is the background
> sync of everything - if an appointment is changed on the dekstop then
> it is changed on the handheld at the same time - there's no need to
> remember to do a sync before leaving the desk.

But that continual sync is only possible if you remember to keep the
device in its cradle.

> I like the fact that pocket PC uses a "real" file system.

But then you write:
> What I don't like about PocketPC.....there's a lot of off things
> happening with the file system. Although it looks like a normal
> windows system, it's not easy to build a directory structure as
> the built-in apps only like to see files stored in "My Documents"
> and won't look elsewhere.

> I think that there's more professional software out there for the
> PocketPC.

Would be nice to see some numbers. I think the impression is that there's
more "professional" software out there for the PPC but the truth is that
there is an equal or lesser amount. Palm OS still dominates the world of
PDAs so developers stand to make more money on the better selling
platform.

But even this kind of reasoning is pointless if the buyer doesn't care
about the "professional" software that you care about.

> But - I am not sure, myself, about the future of PalmOS devices
> simply due to the lack of innovation in the OS and ths standard
> apps. My Treo has, apart from the phone apps, basically the
> same software as my orginal Palm Pro. The lack of development
> in the standard apps has led me to purchase Agendus as a diary
> replacement and other software to replace the build in memopad
> and so on. In fact, apart from the phone app, there's no Palm
> software that I use really - it's all third-party.

Don't understand this claim at all. Is there something wrong with
third-party software?

Microsoft's plan is to use its OS to infiltrate and then take over
third-party software. PalmSource welcomes third-party development and
focuses on the OS.

The Treo is a smartphone version of the Palm OS, and you seem to like it
very much.
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 2:50:27 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Monday, Guy Bannis wrote:

> But that continual sync is only possible if you remember
> to keep the device in its cradle.

Or connected via Bluetooth. I'm not putting down the Palm
sync system, it's just havng to press that button *is* one
more thing have to do. I always have the Palm (and the iPAQ
when I had one) in the cradle when at the PC anyway, so the
continual sync worked well for me.

>> I like the fact that pocket PC uses a "real" file system.

I should have written that "I liked the fact....". I was
tempted by the PPC because I could navigate the internal
and memory card direct from the PC, move/copy files to and
from it without (I thought) any kind of conversion. What I
didn't like was finding out that most of the files DID go
through some kind of conversion, and even though I could
make a directory structure on the PPC, it wasn't always
easy, or even possible, to utilise that structure in things
like Pocket Word.

> Would be nice to see some numbers. I think the impression
> is that there's more "professional" software out there for
> the PPC but the truth is that there is an equal or lesser
> amount. Palm OS still dominates the world of PDAs so
> developers stand to make more money on the better selling
> platform.

I make no claims for any kind of knowledge about the numbers,
or what is even classed as "professional" software and take
on board the fact that many developers are possibly getting
financial backing from MS to develop for PPC, but IN MY
EXPERIENCE, software that I have trialled has generally
SEEMED more professional on the PPC than on the Palm.

> But even this kind of reasoning is pointless if the
> buyer doesn't care about the "professional" software
> that you care about.

Very true - and I admit that my worries are that Palm are
not going to be able to provide the "whizz bang" factor
that is needed to sell machines on the high street. *If*
any particular device looks like it can't do as much out
of the box as the next one can, then it'll get overlooked
by the "masses". PocketPC devices can (although badly) use
Word and Excel documents "out of the box". Palm devices
can as well, but are perceived to not be able to because
of the need for third party software (which, granted, is
often included but still seems to be an "add-on" to the
general user).

> Don't understand this claim at all. Is there something
> wrong with third-party software?

Nothing at all wrong with third-party software. It's just
the guy on the street won't always know that third party
software is there and just assumes that all he can do with
his Palm/PPC is what it does out of the box.

> Microsoft's plan is to use its OS to infiltrate and then
> take over third-party software. PalmSource welcomes third-
> party development and focuses on the OS.

But the result as far as the end user is concerened is that
Microsoft appears to move forward while Palm stays still. I
know enough about MS business practices to see what they do
and what will happen if they get the vastly larger share of
the handheld market and I do recommend people to buy Palm
devices as I know that they are easier to use, a lot more
reliable and "do what they say on the tin". However, having
used Palm since the Pro, I can't really say that the OS has
moved on at all as far as the end user is concerned. Maybe
that's because they got it right at the outset, but the
"average" user just sees the same old same old on each new
machine.

> The Treo is a smartphone version of the Palm OS, and you
> seem to like it very much.

I do - for me, the Treo is just about perfect (if only I
could afford a 650 and get the hi-res screen!).

I support a number of people with PocketPC machines and also
a few with Palms. Those with Palms use them day in, day out
and generally have no problems. Those with PPC tend to lose
files and get frustrated when trying to use Word documents.

I'm happy with Palm for now and can see me staying with the
Treo for the next twelve months. But I will have to have a
very careful look then at just how far the two OS's have
come when I upgrade as the reliablity and useability gap
is shrinking and the features gap seems to be widening.

--
Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk>
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 6:23:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <omt4q0la2hi2gbmsi7fkqvohnchmh9ueu7@4ax.com>, Bryan Anderson
<usenet@bryananderson.co.uk> wrote:

> Or connected via Bluetooth. I'm not putting down the Palm
> sync system, it's just havng to press that button *is* one
> more thing have to do.

There is software forPalm devices that obviates the need to push the button.

> I should have written that "I liked the fact....". I was
> tempted by the PPC because I could navigate the internal
> and memory card direct from the PC, move/copy files to and
> from it without (I thought) any kind of conversion.

There is software that lets you do the same on a Palm device.

> I support a number of people with PocketPC machines and also
> a few with Palms. Those with Palms use them day in, day out
> and generally have no problems. Those with PPC tend to lose
> files and get frustrated when trying to use Word documents.

PPCs tend to be designed like small PCs, with all the usual installation
and troubleshooting complications.
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 7:35:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Bryan Anderson" <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk> wrote in message
news:o mt4q0la2hi2gbmsi7fkqvohnchmh9ueu7@4ax.com...
> On Monday, Guy Bannis wrote:
>
>> But that continual sync is only possible if you remember
>> to keep the device in its cradle.
>
> Or connected via Bluetooth. I'm not putting down the Palm
> sync system, it's just havng to press that button *is* one
> more thing have to do. I always have the Palm (and the iPAQ
> when I had one) in the cradle when at the PC anyway, so the
> continual sync worked well for me.
>

I can seem some advantage to the continuous sync but isn't there a possible
disadvantage too? What if you are constantly changing appointments around on
the PC? Would that create any issues? I know in my business life
appointments get made and changed often, sometimes within minutes or even
seconds. It would seem to me to generate many more synch events if it was
continuous. Maybe it's not a big deal?

TC

SNIP
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 7:44:59 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Bryan Anderson" <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk> wrote in message
news:1re4q0l9br5h3gimechendiik87idihf4m@4ax.com...
> On Monday, Tony Clark wrote:
>
>> I'd disagree that Bluetooth is a frivolous feature.
>
> I'd disagree with your disagreement ;-)
>

It's your right to do so, even if i disagree... :) 

>> I use it all the time with my T3.
>
> I don't miss it at all with my Treo.
>
>> It's quite handy for synching
>
> Why would I want to sync via BT when the Treo is in the cradle
> anyway to charge it? My iPAQ had BT and I thought it'd be great
> to sync with a cradle. But the I realised that the thing would
> need to be in the cradle to charge anyway, so why not syc via
> the cable?
>

The reason is that I don't carry the cradle with me to work. I sync with
both my home PC and my work laptop. Not having to haul around the cradle is
convenient to me. I will confess that you can carry a USB cable and use that
to sync/charge but it's one more wire to deal with. I have too many wires
running all over my desk anyways. :) 

> I suppose iit *might* be useful to sync via BT and then leave
> the cradle on the bedside table to charge overnight....
>
>> connecting to the net via my PC
>
> Why? Why would you connect your Palm to the net when you have
> a desktop PC within 10m of the Palm? The tiny screens make web
> browsing pointless apart from in an emergency.

Because the PC is 10m above my head in the upstairs office. I can use the
Palm to check email from the comfort of my Lazy-Boy lounger in the
downstairs family room. Granted, it's not exactly something I do all the
time, but it can be useful on occasion. I agree about the screen size and
web surfing, not optimal but again occasionally useful.

>
>> and soon I will use it to connect to a GPS device.
>
> Granted - one of the two uses I can see for BT.
>

Wow, look at that, two things we agree on...LOL

> The other would be to print direct to a BT enabled printer. It
> would be so nice if all higher-end printers had BT built in,
> and I could then print notes for a client, in their office, from
> my handheld direct to their own printer.
>
> Apart from that, I don't miss or feel I need, Bluetooth at all.
>
SNIP

I also use BT in conjunction with my BT cellular phone. That is probably the
best reason to have BT on the Palm. Talk about small screens, try reading
email on a Sony Ericsson T68i. Ouch! My eyes! LOL The other thing that is
cool is to select a contact on the Palm and have it dial my cell phone using
BT. Combined with a BT headset I never have to touch the phone.

Cheers
TC
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 7:46:53 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Doug Hoffman" <dhoffman@journey.com> wrote in message
news:D hoffman-CA492B.19451822112004@news.chatlink.com...
>I wrote:
>
>> And if it also came with 1 Meg of RAM and sold for $149 it
>> would be even more popular.
>
> Of course I meant at least 256 Meg. Oh what the heck, make 1 Gig!
>
> Regards,
>
> -Doug

Yeah and a hard drive and a DVD player and...LOL... I get your point.

It's just that BT on the TE would make it a bit more useful for things like
GPS or email/web surfing using a BT phone.

Cheers
TC
November 23, 2004 2:03:50 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"Harry" <harrysmith03@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:4mk1q05u2vjln2qet34n6hasnsq0nc9jk8@4ax.com...
> I have been a Palm OS user for at least 5 years now. I am about to
> renew my Sony Clie and I am currently undecided whether to go for an
> HP IPAQ or stick to a Palm OS. I noted that the Pocket PC has recently
> gained a lot of grounds on the Palm OS in terms of sale figures. Is
> this anything to go by???? I would appreciate any views on the matter.
> What are the pros & cons of both OS? Hope to hear from you guys as I
> intend to offer myself one for Xmas...... Thanks Robert

I bought a Sony Clie TH55 in July and I love it, but I'm afraid to say that
if I was buying now I would probably end up with PPC. Why?

- Now the TH55 is discontinued there are no PalmOS Bluetooth + 802.11b devices
There is just so much more competition in the PPC market driving manufacturers
to innovate.

- Judging by the rate of new apps on Palmgear I fear that the third party software
market is gathering steam for PPC and dying out for PalmOS.

- I had a long play with a colleagues Dell Axim (a colleague who bought every new
PalmOS device for the last 4 years as soon as they came out and just switched
to PPC). I was impressed. I didn't find it slow and the one thing that really
suprised me was how effective the handwriting recognition is, you just write in
your normal joined up handwriting and I got almost 100% perfect recognition,
certainly fewer errors than I get with Graffiti.

Those are my 2 cents worth. Unless something dramatic happens in the PalmOS
world in the next 18 months then my next PDA will be PPC.

- Julian
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 8:33:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

If I was in your position, I'd seriously consider the Treo 650 smartphone.
I'm tired of carrying around a phone AND a PDA, and I've heard the Treo is
pretty good at both functions.

"Harry" <harrysmith03@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4mk1q05u2vjln2qet34n6hasnsq0nc9jk8@4ax.com...
> I have been a Palm OS user for at least 5 years now. I am about to
> renew my Sony Clie and I am currently undecided whether to go for an
> HP IPAQ or stick to a Palm OS.
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 10:20:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <qOEod.22652$08.16678@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk>, "Julian"
<nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

> There is just so much more competition in the PPC market driving
manufacturers
> to innovate.

I don't think that's true. There is one dominant manufacturer in the PPC
market, HP.

And I doubt HP is making much profit off the iPaqs.

> - Judging by the rate of new apps on Palmgear I fear that the third
party software
> market is gathering steam for PPC and dying out for PalmOS.

How many of these "new" apps already exist for the Palm OS?

I do think PalmOne/PalmSource are at a crossroads: smartphone (where they
don't dominante, but neither does Microsoft) or PDA? Can they do both?
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 4:46:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

It was a time of great turmoil. The strong preyed on the weak, dogs
and cats lived together. One voice cried out in the wilderness: Doug
Hoffman <dhoffman@journey.com> wrote in
<dhoffman-624C09.04531022112004@news.chatlink.com>:

> In article <I5hod.1987$uV6.459@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
> "Tony Clark" <curiousgeorge1964@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Most Palms with 320x320 screens cost more than $200. The TE is the only one
> > that I know of that is under $200 at $199.
>
> Only a fool would pay $199. Palm is selling them with a 128 Meg SD card
> and $50 off if you trade in your old Palm. I've seen open box specials
> for $150. Blemished for less. You have touched on just one of the
> reasons the TE is so popular. Great screen with all of the most needed
> features at a great price. No frivolous high-end techie stuff like
> built in camera, bluetooth, etc.
>
I paid $160 for mine almost a year ago.

--
Roberto Castillo
robertocastillo@ameritech.net
http://www.freewebs.com/robertocastillo/
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 7:20:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Palm
+ More software
+ Easier to use w/o menuing about
+ Still the standard in PDAs
+ OS changes don't kill many of the older apps
+ Treo 650! (http://www.palmone.com/us/products/smartphones/treo650/)
Former Treo 600 is the #1 top rated cell phone + PDA + web + email +
speakerphone + camera + keyboard all-in-one.
+ Garmin GPS Palm PDA! (http://www.garmin.com/products/iQue3600/)
+ Sony Japan-only video Palm PDA! $$$
(http://www.sony.jp/products/Consumer/PEG/PEG-VZ90/index...)
- Low res. 320x320 or 320x480 max screens
- Only two brand makers, PalmOne & Sony
- Often, slower processor
- No voice control program

PocketPC
+ Large number of makers
+ 640x480 max res screen models
+ Built-in Word/Excel compatibility & sync.
+ Voice control program (optional)
+ Lots of GPS navi. software/unit options
+ Built-in full 100% handwritten English-to-text recognition
(Transcriber). You can easily write like you were taught in
grade-school w/o having to learn to write Graffiti ala Palm PDAs.
- Fewer software
- Microsoft OS changes every year, making lots of older programs
incompatible and non-working.
- A lot more menuing about (wasting time) to get to various other apps
and settings.

----

Way I figured is like this -- Palm PDAs start off cheaper (color Zire
31 $149); just discontinued models even lower (Zire 71 <$100 new
everywhere including www.ebay.com), have more software, work and sync
perfectly all the time with the very nice Palm Desktop organizer
software, and does the job fine. Easier to deal with organizer features
than PocketPC (and more powerful using DateBk -
http://www.pimlicosoftware.com/datebk5.htm) makes it a killer organizer
that simply works well. And easier to get a replacement in case you
drop and break that particular Palm PDA, and syncing all of your data
from the desktop back to the new Palm replacement works perfectly using
the Palm Desktop.

But, if you want handwriting or voice input, only the PocketPC models
will do, and for the basics, you can still organize fine with either
type of PDA.
November 25, 2004 12:54:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 16:20:09 -0800, David Chien <chiendh@uci.edu>
removed the duct tape and proclaimed:

>PocketPC
>+ Built-in full 100% handwritten English-to-text recognition
>(Transcriber). You can easily write like you were taught in
>grade-school w/o having to learn to write Graffiti ala Palm PDAs.

You can always use Jot on the Palm.

--
I put 2 and 2 together and got 22.
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 11:19:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Wednesday, Bruno wrote:

> You can always use Jot on the Palm.

"It's really more of a character recognition package though as you
still can only input one character at a time. You can not input a
string of connected characters."

from http://www.the-gadgeteer.com/jot-review.html

The thing with Transcriber on the PPC (and I have used this and I
was very impressed) is that you can write in your normal handwriting
anywhere on the screen and it does a VERY goo job of converting that
to text. You don't need to learn any new characters or symbols at all
as it learns how you write.

--
Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk>
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 11:30:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Wednesday, David Chien wrote:

>Palm
>+ More software

Debatable. In my opinion, although there ARE a lot more apps out
there for PalmOS, I found that there was a LOT of duplication and
an awful lot of very amatuer offerings. Yes there is more choice,
but when you get right down to it, for every app that you want
there's probably only as many choices for the Palm as for the
PocketPC when you take out all the half-finished and frozen apps
for the Palm.

>+ OS changes don't kill many of the older apps

That'll be because the OS hardly changes at all!

>+ Treo 650!

Excellent point - I think PalmOS would continue on even if the Treo
were the only device it was used in. I really can't imagine going
back to a seperate phone and PDA system and none of the PocketPC
phones can touch the Treo for integration and size.

>- Often, slower processor

Not an issue in general, but is probably what is holding back any
development on voice recognition and a Transcriber equivalent.

>PocketPC
>+ Large number of makers

Does mean that there are some cracking deals on PocketPC's from
the smaller names. Great if you're the kind that gets bored soon
and wants to change each year.

>+ 640x480 max res screen models

Don't know what it does to battery life though. Some of the screen
shots I've seen of things like Agenda Fusion on the hi-res screens
are great though.

>+ Built-in Word/Excel compatibility & sync.

Not half what they claim to be.

>+ Voice control program (optional)

I can't imagine wanting to "talk" to my palm. It's only just getting
acceptable to use a handheld device in public without people staring
at you, but talking to the damn thing?

>+ Built-in full 100% handwritten English-to-text recognition
>(Transcriber).

I forgot all about this from when I used PocketPC, but I was very,
very impressed first time I used this. It still needs work on some
things (like navigation using backspace and so on) and punctuation,
but the handwrting recognition is superb.

>- Fewer software

But generally more "finished".

>- Microsoft OS changes every year, making lots of older programs
> incompatible and non-working.

I found that most of the apps that had problems with newer OS vers,
were share- and freeware and less well supported. Professional stuff
is as supported as Palm software and updates are issued and new vers
issued for new OS's. Guess that's progress and development on the OS
front.

>- A lot more menuing about (wasting time) to get to various other
> apps and settings.

Never really found this to be a problem.

I'm pro-Palm myself, but worried by the lack of innovation and
development in the software and strange decisions on hardware features
in Palm devices (like the W - a phone with no earpieces or mic), too
many Palms with either BT or WiFi but not both, a great marketing
thing about using some of the Palm memory as a flash drive...damn
site easier to just carry a USB flash pen, surely.

I do wonder if Palm think about what the consumer wants before they
make their design/strategy decisions.

--
Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk>
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 11:33:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Tuesday, Guy Bannis wrote:

[Hotsync]
> There is software forPalm devices that obviates the need to
> push the button.

Can you give me any pointers as to the best ones? Anything that
does a constant sync? Or do they just sync on a schedule?

> PPCs tend to be designed like small PCs, with all the usual
> installation and troubleshooting complications.

I think that's okay for those os us that know something about
PC's and how to keep them clean and working well, but for those
that don't, installing and un-installing stuff from PPC can be
a nightmare! One area where the simple .prc/.pdb system on the
Palm seems to score highly over PocketPC.

--
Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk>
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 7:35:50 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk> wrote:

> The thing with Transcriber on the PPC (and I have used this and I
> was very impressed) is that you can write in your normal handwriting
> anywhere on the screen and it does a VERY goo job of converting that
> to text.

Maybe it works impressively for you, but *my* normal handwriting is
largely unintelligible to both man and machine. :)  None of the Windows CE
devices I tried could figure out even half my words. The best results I
ever got were with a Newton (MessagePad 2001, I believe), and even it
missed about one word in five.

> You don't need to learn any new characters or symbols at all
> as it learns how you write.

I found that being "forced" to use the original Graffiti strokes was a
*good* thing. Like learning to type, I knew that any mistakes were mine
-- I couldn't blame the PDA for not understanding me. I got "recognition
accuracy" as good as or better than typing.

(Graffiti II irritates me constantly, with the forced two-stroke
characters and the idiotic scheme of recognizing a letter "l" then
subsequently backspacing and replacing it with "t" or "k", etc. It breaks
shortcuts and autocompleting fields. Maybe I should buy Jot and tweak it
back to the original Graffiti strokes.)
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 12:49:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

aranders@insightbb.com (Alan Anderson) writes:

> (Graffiti II irritates me constantly, with the forced two-stroke
> characters and the idiotic scheme of recognizing a letter "l" then
> subsequently backspacing and replacing it with "t" or "k", etc. It breaks
> shortcuts and autocompleting fields. Maybe I should buy Jot and tweak it
> back to the original Graffiti strokes.)

I also recently retired my trusty old USRobotics Pilot 5000 (which admittedly
had mostly been used as a password archive for the last 5 years) and got
a Zire 72. Graffiti 2 was instantly annoying; I found a solution in
MessageEase (www.exideas.com has a free trial). It's quite different from
normal handwriting entry, but after using it for a while I've found it
more accurate and faster than even Graffiti 1. I suspect it might not be
for everyone, though.

(Astroturf disclaimer: I'm not associated with Exideas, MessageEase or any
related party.)

-v
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 1:48:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

On Thursday, Alan Anderson wrote:

> Maybe it works impressively for you, but *my*
> normal handwriting is largely unintelligible to
> both man and machine.

My handwriting is so bad that *I* have trouble reading
it (I blame it on spending years doing technical drawing
and design at school and only ever writing in block caps
on technical drawings!) but the PocketPC used to *get me*
all the time.

> Graffiti II irritates me constantly

You can replace it with the Graffiti I libraries - well,
at least in some Palms. I have Graffiti Anywhere on my
Treo and have installed the Graffiti I libraries as I
also had trouble with II.

--
Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk>
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 3:47:24 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <pc5bq09eqm17abssaifdbufjrucj45i0tm@4ax.com>, Bryan Anderson
<usenet@bryananderson.co.uk> wrote:

> On Wednesday, David Chien wrote:
>
> >+ OS changes don't kill many of the older apps
>
> That'll be because the OS hardly changes at all!

No. Because PalmSource takes pain to maintain compatibility with older
apps. E.g., PACE, for Palm Application Compatibility Environment.


> >PocketPC
> >+ Large number of makers
>
> Does mean that there are some cracking deals on PocketPC's from
> the smaller names.

There may be more PPC makers but the market is dominated by one (HP).
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 3:48:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

In article <326bq0plhuotugo4a3ba84rtafshd5l542@4ax.com>, Bryan Anderson
<usenet@bryananderson.co.uk> wrote:

> On Tuesday, Guy Bannis wrote:
>
> [Hotsync]
> > There is software forPalm devices that obviates the need to
> > push the button.
>
> Can you give me any pointers as to the best ones? Anything that
> does a constant sync? Or do they just sync on a schedule?

Check at www.boxwave.com
November 27, 2004 1:15:36 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

Charles Hawtrey wrote:
> Bryan Anderson <usenet@bryananderson.co.uk> wrote:
>
>
>
>>I'm pro-Palm myself, but worried by the lack of innovation and
>>development in the software and strange decisions on hardware features
>>in Palm devices (like the W - a phone with no earpieces or mic), too
>>many Palms with either BT or WiFi but not both, a great marketing
>>thing about using some of the Palm memory as a flash drive...damn
>>site easier to just carry a USB flash pen, surely.
>
>
> Along these lines it would be great if Palm took a modular approach so
> that the buyer could get the combination of features he or she wants.
> For example, I'd love to get a Palm with WiFi and GPS, but have no use
> for Bluetooth, an MP3 player or a camera.
>
>
>>I do wonder if Palm think about what the consumer wants before they
>>make their design/strategy decisions.
>
>
> I've seen absolutely no evidence that they do. Correction, maybe they
> do think about it but they very often get it wrong. I wonder how many
> people buy a Palm specifically so they can have a camera?
>
>
I like the modular idea. That's why I cannot stand the thought of
having to use a single device for both phone and PDA (unlike Bryan
Anderson ;-) - I use them differently (want smallness for phone, and
relative bigness for PDA), and also would not want battery time for
talking wasted on PDA functions/bright big screens.

My latest Palm happens to be a Zire 71, but the only reason (besides the
fast-disappearing "Universal" connecter) I got it instead of something
like a T/E was that it was a closeout floor sample for $130 early this
year. The camera "feature" actually was holding me back from getting
it since it seemed frivolous, and could possibly get me in trouble at
work (many businesses worry about industrial espionage and are paranoid
about cameras on premises - camera-capable phones and PDA's are frowned
upon if not prohibited), but since I work at home 99% of the time, I
decided to risk if for the deal. As it is, I have found the camera
function useful every so often as a type of visual note-taking, and some
candid pix of events I'm involved in (exactly what the corp anti-spies
would worry about ;-).

But I would still prefer to save money by leaving out a camera, and also
hope to gain battery life, and more compactness with still as big a
screen as will "fit in the hand" (admittedly, the Z71 is one of the more
awkward feeling shapes, but not too much to offset that low price ;-).

I do like having the MP3 feature, and would definitely prefer it over a
camera (Sony got that really backwards with their last low-end model,
the TJ-27). Having held the Zire 72, though, I might make another
exception if the price gets low enough - it has a great feel in my hand
at least, compared to most other handhelds I've tried since my M130.

I would also have to say that if Palm "innovates" too much more (agree
that Graffiti 2 is definitely more awkward than G-1 with the 2-stroke
letters, but better with the auto caps area between numbers and letters
for a near net tradeoff for me), it would be too much like the bloat of
PPC, and would definitely turn me off.

I have tried HPC (still dabbling with a Jornada 728 and MobilePro
780/790, which was perfect for taking notes in a class this past summer
- all-in-one unit with keyboard that was quite usable compared to the
Jornada and with Pocket Word's basic functionality - aside from that,
too limited, though - I still used the Z71 for PIM functions), and PPC
(Ipaq 1910 - even better fit than the Z72, but not much else to excite
me, and Toshiba Genio E-550 - loved the CF slot for my WiFi card, but
then looking at websites and email on that limited screen was too
restrictive after the novelty wore off).

I even tried a Sharp Zaurus CL-5600, and was impressed by the Linux
functionality, but the Windows-ish inteface, awkward shape, and the
ridiculous thumbboard (hold me back from ranting about the appalling
stupidity of pepetuating the crippling QWERTY layout with a whole new
typing paradigm - "parathumbs" - with this unit - and all thumbboard
units - fresh start with Dvorak anyone?) just brought me back to Palm's
simplicity - innovation for its own sake is not necessarily a virtue
(whereas a Dvorak thumbboard would be a real and worthwhile innovation).

Back to modularity: For "real" computing, I find a laptop or my latest
experiment, a Fujitsu Stylistic LT with its 800x600 8-inch screen far
more suitable; for PIM functions, a Palm; and a cell phone for phone
functions - to each his own.

--
--
Rory O'Connor -
r o o c o n n
n c
r r
c o m
( p u t 'em together with @ and dots for my email@ddress)
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 4:44:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

>>PocketPC
>>+ Built-in full 100% handwritten English-to-text recognition
>>(Transcriber). You can easily write like you were taught in
>>grade-school w/o having to learn to write Graffiti ala Palm PDAs.
>
>
> You can always use Jot on the Palm.

According to their website, JOT only translates PRINTED (pen does
break between) characters, not full CURSIVE HANDWRITTEN English (ie. all
characters in a word are connected, pen does not leave the screen).

The PocketPC machines translate both PRINTED and CURSIVE English.

The closest I've seen after an extensive search is Decuma On Spot for
the Palm PDAs:http://www.decuma.com/
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 4:46:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

>>Palm
>>+ More software
> Debatable. In my opinion, although there ARE a lot more apps out
> there for PalmOS, I found that there was a LOT of duplication and
> an awful lot of very amatuer offerings. Yes there is more choice,

There is more choice. And that's the advantage. Although you may
like whatever limited selection of software there is for a particular
platform, many others do not and prefer alternatives. on the Palm,
there's almost always an alternative (or dozens), so if one app doesn't
do it for you, you can easily find a suitable choice. Not everyone
needs all-the-features, rather, something that makes sense to them.
November 30, 2004 2:51:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops.pilot (More info?)

"David Chien" <chiendh@uci.edu> wrote in message news:cog56u$ror$2@news.service.uci.edu...
> >>PocketPC
> >>+ Built-in full 100% handwritten English-to-text recognition
> >>(Transcriber). You can easily write like you were taught in
> >>grade-school w/o having to learn to write Graffiti ala Palm PDAs.
> >
> >
> > You can always use Jot on the Palm.
>
> According to their website, JOT only translates PRINTED (pen does
> break between) characters, not full CURSIVE HANDWRITTEN English (ie. all
> characters in a word are connected, pen does not leave the screen).
>
> The PocketPC machines translate both PRINTED and CURSIVE English.
>
> The closest I've seen after an extensive search is Decuma On Spot for
> the Palm PDAs:http://www.decuma.com/

It's wierd isn't it. I've been a PalmOS owner for 5 years but I played with a friend's
Dell Axim for a few minutes recently and the thing that most impressed me was
the handwriting recognition, it was so good that it was almost the "killer feature"
that would persuade me to switch. It's only software so I really wonder why noone
in the PalmOS world has tried to do it. Could it be that CPU performance for
most PalmOS models just isn't up to the job? Complex pattern recognition like
that required for accurate and flexible real-time cursive handwriting recognition is
pretty hard on the CPU.

- Julian
!