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How to fix Bose headphone tiny wire out

Last response: in Home Audio
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December 5, 2011 2:17:29 AM

Hi

I have this 3 year old sort of folding noise cancellation Bose Headphone which doesnt produce sound (most of the time) onto one side. How do I fix it?
December 5, 2011 10:41:28 AM

Good chance you broke the wire or pulled it out. I had a bose, same issue. Not worth buying a repair cable so i upgraded to a new brand. Bose is such crap, you live you learn.
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December 5, 2011 10:55:16 AM



ssddx said:
Good chance you broke the wire or pulled it out. I had a bose, same issue. Not worth buying a repair cable so i upgraded to a new brand. Bose is such crap, you live you learn.


Hi. Thanks for responding.

Well, the wire isn't pulled out. Question is, Are all Bose headphones THAT crappy that it isn't worth trying to fix it? Which brand, make,.. headphone can replace this one? Is there a way to post a picture here so you know exactly what and which one I am talking about?

Thanks again.
SipR
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December 5, 2011 2:30:22 PM

i had the cheaper non-noise cancelling model so i know what you mean by thin wires. i used it every day during the week and the wire connection was intermittant due to an internal wire break. the outter rubber sleeve on the wire was undamaged.

technically if this is the problem you could open up the headphones and solder the connection back up but you're never going to have that little rubber piece to fill the hole which means either you patch it up somehow or the wire just pulls off again.

of course it could always be a bad speaker but due to the nature of the fragile wire this seems more likely. if it is a speaker then its definitely not worth fixing unless you happen to have a spare on hand or can get one really cheap.

in monetary value... you could repair the headphones (if its a bad cord or connection) for practically free provided you have a solder gun, solder and something to plug the hole. the "worth it" i was talking about was having to deal with the issue again and again due to the same problem. so yes, its my opinion not a monetary thing. technically fixing it would be more cost effective but i got fed up with how cheap the product felt for the original price paid (opinion).

at the time i thought bose was okay equipment but i learned later that in the grand scheme of things they arent. i also heard that bose tends to use inferior equipment and any cheap-outs they can while still charging an arm and a leg for the products they sell. which does make sense in hindsight. i'm not saying the products they offer do not work, just that they are not worth the price at all (opinion).

if you require noise cancellation headphones then i cannot really be of help since i do not use a pair myself. however, if the passive noise dampening effect of over-the-ear headphones is sufficient enough then i can make a recommendation, or at least offer up the product i am now using.

i'm currently using an audiotechnica ath-m50s. the s model denotes straight cord, the version without the s suffix denotes a coiled cord. its a studio monitor headphone which has been called one of the best headphones under $300 and is built pretty hardy. the cords are 3-4x the thickness of bose products. the only fault is that you may have to replace the earpads depending on how often you use it. this is due to the effect sweat & grime from your head has on synthetic leather. definitely not a problem though considering the very reasonable price and great sound.

if that isnt your thing i've heard sennheiser offers some good models.
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December 5, 2011 9:38:09 PM

Sennheiser, AKG, Grado (not sure if they make noise cancelling), audio technica as mentioned, all good options. Bose are no better than those 'Beats' headphones that Monster Cable is trying to peddle. That isn't to say that they are bad headphones, just bad for the price.

The way I see it you have two options. First option is to get your set re-cabled. Either your left or your right connection is broken somewhere. Try your local audio shop (think stage, lighting, not musicians), or a car audio place even. I can't see it taking more than an hour to have new cable done. Your second option is to go to Head-Fi.org and start doing some research into your next set of headphones. Keep in mind that some enthusiasts have their headphones re-cabled regardless, so consider the cost of that if you do decide to go with a different set of headphones.
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December 13, 2011 12:29:51 AM

Thanks again for the informative replies. It's well appreciated.

I wonder why people here seem to be very upset on Bose headphones. I had and have Sennheiser, one broke easily and the other is still going. The Bose that I am talking about is the most comfortable, foldable and great noise cancelation.

I am not thaaat mechanical as far as owning a soldering tool, so I don't know what to do. I wonder if anyone here would accept an offer for me to send it to him/her and fix it for me for a pay, or if one is willing to buy it off for some pay. To me it looks to be able to get fixed/repaired, so I wouldn't want it to go to waste one way or another.

Thanks for your friendly support and help.

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Best solution

December 13, 2011 10:39:00 AM

sipukim,

its not so much being angry at bose or their product as much as letting people know that bose =/= the quality product they claim to be.

for example the model i had went for about $120 a few years ago yet came with a very thin cable like the one you mentioned that easily broke over time as well as a very fragile earcup support and headband compared to other options available. compare that to the $160 or so pair of m50s i own now. the only somewhat breakable part is the yoke which holds the earcup and even that is thick enough to withstand some abuse. plus the speaker quality is much much better.

dont get me wrong bose CAN do an okay job and make an okay product (like the system in my car) but they are by no means worth the price they charge. i'd rather have another brand that is more worth the price.

--

as far as what to do:

since you said you arent very technical...i guess asking you to test the connections is out of the picture. you could just assume it is the cord and try replacing it. if its not the cord its not worth keeping the headphones anyways.

search online for headphone cords and pick one up that is a replacement or a similar type. you could even take a cord off of a cheap headphone model and just swap them out.

you will need a solder gun and solder. as long as you are careful its not terribly difficult. honestly if you can hotglue you should be able to solder.

if its too much for you...i'm sure a local audio shop, or other electronics repair shop can do it for you...but for what they will charge you...it most likely isnt worthwhile. at most you should pay $20-25 since its a 10 minute job.
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December 19, 2011 11:29:39 PM

Best answer selected by Sipukim.
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December 19, 2011 11:32:36 PM

Thank you for your response. I might consider rewiring it.

TybudX said:
Sennheiser, AKG, Grado (not sure if they make noise cancelling), audio technica as mentioned, all good options. Bose are no better than those 'Beats' headphones that Monster Cable is trying to peddle. That isn't to say that they are bad headphones, just bad for the price.

The way I see it you have two options. First option is to get your set re-cabled. Either your left or your right connection is broken somewhere. Try your local audio shop (think stage, lighting, not musicians), or a car audio place even. I can't see it taking more than an hour to have new cable done. Your second option is to go to Head-Fi.org and start doing some research into your next set of headphones. Keep in mind that some enthusiasts have their headphones re-cabled regardless, so consider the cost of that if you do decide to go with a different set of headphones.

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December 20, 2011 4:35:40 AM

you could just assume it is the cord and try replacing it. if its not the cord its not worth keeping the headphones anyways.
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December 20, 2011 5:24:56 AM

chaere said:
http://www.uklv.info/g.gif you could just assume it is the cord and try replacing it. if its not the cord its not worth keeping the headphones anyways.


I know, but hanging the inside of cord is a big issue. This headphone has a very tine cord coming out of 1 side which is female, it come with a both ended male cord to connect it to the player. I would give it way as is but if u can fix it I still believe its worth some $$. When it works it works great. Very good sound and bass, AND it's noise cancellation, also very comfy on the ear. It has a special good foam, soft, sort of like memory sponge.
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December 5, 2013 11:13:22 PM

I am also having the same problem with my bose,I have search How to Repair Earphone? but i didn't get answers,Just i have to change my bose.
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December 7, 2013 11:28:48 AM

At least some Bose headphones use ribbon not stranded wire and so can break after repeated stress. You can't really solder or work with a flat aluminum foil like wire.
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