Difference between 'folder' and 'file folder'

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windows.file_system (More info?)

What is the difference in XP between a 'FOLDER' and 'FILE FOLDER'?

I have come across junction points and the 'FILE FOLDER' seems to
behave a bit like a junction point but not quite.

Below is some more detail regarding what I am asking about.

==================

This might not be as very well expressed on account of my limited
technical knowledge ...


I have observed that most regular folders which contain data files
seem to be of type 'FILE FOLDER'

Strangely, I find that can create a new 'FOLDER' (not 'FILE
FOLDER') by starting with an existing 'FILE FOLDER' and then
dragging & dropping it into a 'FILE FOLDER' which I am already
using as a menu.

(My menus are stored in %PROFILE%/START MENU and are used as
toolbar menus which pop up from the taskbar when clicked.)

Can someone also explain why a 'FOLDER' seems to contain data
files but is in fact empty. The data files are in the original
'FILE FOLDER' which the 'FOLDER' was made from (and presumably
still points to).

Thank you.
3 answers Last reply
More about difference folder file folder
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windows.file_system (More info?)

    File Folder
    http://www.officedepot.com/ddSKU.do?level=SK&id=315515&uniqueSearchFlag=true&Ntt=file+folder&x=42&y=18&An=text

    File, Folder and Directory

    file
    [[A complete, named collection of information, such as a program, a set of
    data used by a program, or a user-created document. A file is the basic unit
    of storage that enables a computer to distinguish one set of information
    from another. It is a collection of data that a user can retrieve, change,
    delete, save, or send to an output device, such as a printer or e-mail
    program.]]

    folder
    [[A container for programs and files in graphical user interfaces,
    symbolized on the screen by a graphical image (icon) of a file folder. A
    folder is a means of organizing programs and documents on a disk and can
    hold both files and additional folders.]]

    directory
    [[Computer manuals often describe directories and file structures in terms
    of an inverted tree. The files and directories at any level are contained in
    the directory above them. To access a file, you may need to specify the
    names of all the directories above it. You do this by specifying a path.

    The topmost directory in any file is called the root directory. A directory
    that is below another directory is called a subdirectory. A directory above
    a subdirectory is called the parent directory. Under DOS and Windows, the
    root directory is a back slash (\). ]]

    folder
    [[In graphical user interfaces such as Windows and the Macintosh
    environment, a folder is an object that can contain multiple documents.
    Folders are used to organize information. In the DOS and UNIX worlds,
    folders are called directories. ]]

    Directory
    [[A directory and folder are exactly the same thing, windows refers to them
    as folders but you will often come across them being called directories.
    Directories/folders allow information to be stored in your computer in a
    more convenient way making it easier to organise your files.

    Directories/folders can be created, renamed and deleted much like files, it
    is good practise to create these directories/folders and keep your files in
    them as this helps keep your hard drive organised.]]

    Directory
    [[A directory and folder are exactly the same thing, windows refers to them
    as folders but you will often come across them being called directories.
    Directories/folders allow information to be stored in your computer in a
    more convenient way making it easier to organise your files.

    Directories/folders can be created, renamed and deleted much like files, it
    is good practise to create these directories/folders and keep your files in
    them as this helps keep your hard drive organised.]]

    --
    Hope this helps. Let us know.

    Wes
    MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

    In news:96C928D1C2ABE31E75@204.153.244.156,
    Alex Coleman <coalie@nomail.com> hunted and pecked:
    > What is the difference in XP between a 'FOLDER' and 'FILE FOLDER'?
    >
    > I have come across junction points and the 'FILE FOLDER' seems to
    > behave a bit like a junction point but not quite.
    >
    > Below is some more detail regarding what I am asking about.
    >
    > ==================
    >
    > This might not be as very well expressed on account of my limited
    > technical knowledge ...
    >
    >
    >
    > I have observed that most regular folders which contain data files
    > seem to be of type 'FILE FOLDER'
    >
    > Strangely, I find that can create a new 'FOLDER' (not 'FILE
    > FOLDER') by starting with an existing 'FILE FOLDER' and then
    > dragging & dropping it into a 'FILE FOLDER' which I am already
    > using as a menu.
    >
    > (My menus are stored in %PROFILE%/START MENU and are used as
    > toolbar menus which pop up from the taskbar when clicked.)
    >
    > Can someone also explain why a 'FOLDER' seems to contain data
    > files but is in fact empty. The data files are in the original
    > 'FILE FOLDER' which the 'FOLDER' was made from (and presumably
    > still points to).
    >
    > Thank you.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windows.file_system (More info?)

    "" wrote:
    > What is the difference in XP between a 'FOLDER' and 'FILE
    > FOLDER'?
    >
    > I have come across junction points and the 'FILE FOLDER' seems
    > to
    > behave a bit like a junction point but not quite.
    >
    > Below is some more detail regarding what I am asking about.
    >
    > ==================
    >
    > This might not be as very well expressed on account of my
    > limited
    > technical knowledge ...
    >
    >
    >
    > I have observed that most regular folders which contain data
    > files
    > seem to be of type 'FILE FOLDER'
    >
    > Strangely, I find that can create a new 'FOLDER' (not 'FILE
    > FOLDER') by starting with an existing 'FILE FOLDER' and then
    > dragging & dropping it into a 'FILE FOLDER' which I am already
    >
    > using as a menu.
    >
    > (My menus are stored in %PROFILE%/START MENU and are used as
    > toolbar menus which pop up from the taskbar when clicked.)
    >
    > Can someone also explain why a 'FOLDER' seems to contain data
    > files but is in fact empty. The data files are in the
    > original
    > 'FILE FOLDER' which the 'FOLDER' was made from (and presumably
    >
    > still points to).
    >
    > Thank you.

    Folder’s and File Folders are infact the same thing with diffrant
    names, of course folders arnt actualy folders at all, they are
    directorys, it’s just the Micrsoft desided to express them as
    folders, even though they are called directorys.

    --
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    Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
    Topic URL: http://www.windowsforumz.com/General-Discussion-Difference-folder-file-folder-ftopict417824.html
    Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.windowsforumz.com/eform.php?p=1394581
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windows.file_system (More info?)

    On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 04:00:45 +0100 in
    microsoft.public.windowsxp.general, Alex Coleman favored us with...
    > What is the difference in XP between a 'FOLDER' and 'FILE FOLDER'?
    >
    > I have come across junction points and the 'FILE FOLDER' seems to
    > behave a bit like a junction point but not quite.

    I don't think "file folder" is standard Windows terminology, but
    you're right that some folders are regular file directories and some
    are, well, special.

    I don't have a really good reference to suggest, I'm afraid.

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com/
    "And if you're afraid of butter, which many people are nowa-
    days, (long pause) you just put in cream." --Julia Child
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