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New A/V Receiver died on me

Last response: in Home Audio
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January 4, 2012 7:39:54 AM

I recently purchased a 5.1 speaker setup + receiver. After following hooking up the speakers and playing around with the settings I got the sound to work - however the receiver would shut off automatically when any moderately loud volume was played through all the speakers (moderately loud = just above normal human speaking volume).

After playing around with the settings for a bit (lowering the output of specific speakers) the A/V reciever just up and died on me (will no longer turn on even after having unplugged all the speakeres).
I am currently returning it back to where I bought it.

Here is the question, was there a problem with the reciever itself? As far as I could tell the speakers use no where near the power output that the receiver can manage - and the sub is self-powered so that should not have been an issue.
Since I need a new receiver now should I get the same one? Or should I go a step up ?


The receiver I bought was:
Pioneeer VSX-521-K http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=82-117-398&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Page=3

The speakers:
Klipisch Quintet III http://www.klipsch.com/quintet-iii
+
Klipisch SW-350 Subwoofer http://www.klipsch.com/sw-350-subwoofer

More about : receiver died

January 4, 2012 11:47:59 AM

More than likely as it is, you seemed to of received a bad receiver. The circuitry is poor at best from most of the manufacturers these days, even on the expensive receivers.

For example, Harman Kardon just disbanded their AVR development team that had over 100 years experience combined, and the "new" team is the group that came out with the "50" series to the current models. Ex. 1650, 2650, 3650. They took away Pre-outs, so no more external amplifiers, and they took away a huge array of inputs, they did bump the power output, but at the same time the receivers weight was cut in half. If that tells you anything. I cant wait to see how these new line HK's are holding up in a years time.

Unfortunate as it is, this is the norm for MOST (not all) manufacturers. Just cheaper parts, that fail faster! Sometimes before you use it!
January 4, 2012 3:23:50 PM

Are you going to exchange it for another of the same model, or are you thinking of switching? J/W what you were thinking.
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January 5, 2012 6:32:53 AM

Thanks for your replys Smurfonaboat.

It seems I will get credit/refund for the failed receiver so if I wanted to I could get a different model/brand.

Other than the failing hardware this receiver did have a few things I did not like: ran really hot, no video converter (so I have to have RCA plugs hooked into the TV as well as HDMI) and I had to turn my HDMI connected equipment on in a particular order for it to show up on the Television (first receiver, then hdmi input device or else it did not work).

If you have another model/brand (or features) that you recommend I would appreciate any tips. I picked this one partially due to price and mostly due to it being my first a/v reciever and I figured I would start "basic".
If I could some of the same hastle as this last one I would not mind paying an extra 100 for something which I expect should stay up and running for multiple years.
January 5, 2012 1:33:17 PM

What is your budget? And what kind of equipment are you running? 3D viewing? 1080P Viewing?
January 6, 2012 10:11:30 AM

The basic requirements are:

1080P viewing (3D is a + but not worth paying 100 extra for)
HDMI + RCA inputs - Output (preferably a video upscaler so I would only need to swap to 1 channel for any input device)
Sound Decoders - I have no idea which are needed, I watch streaming movies, cds, dvds, Blu-Rays and recorded movies and play video games.
At least 5.1 inputs

Any additional features are nice to haves, though a simple User interface is the most important.

Budget, I had planned for anywhere around 200, but I do not mind going a few 100 extra if it is justified.
January 7, 2012 2:42:09 AM

Might I suggest a Harman Kardon AVR2600. Great receiver, great technology, great power. HK also released a firmware upgrade that now supports 3D, its a 7.1 receiver with all the surround modes. Plenty of ins and outs, HDMI, Component, Optical, standard composite ports.

They can be be had for around $400 which I know is at the top of your budget, but your going to have a receiver you can hang on to for some time, and will do what you need and beyond for years to come.
January 11, 2012 6:18:00 AM

I took a look at the specifics of the AVR2600 (AVR 360 in europe). The features look nice but I am worried about one thing: the output per channel is 55-65W (depending on which website you check).

Is that not a little low (compared to other receivers?). Does the watt output per speaker channel have a direct effect on how loud you can go?
January 14, 2012 2:18:42 AM

Keep in mind the power output from certain brands is true power and not overrated like others. Sure more wattage will power a speaker better and louder. But an HK with 65w channel will power most speakers you throw at it. Or you could look at the AVR2650, but it will cost you a tad more, but it has a higher power rating.
January 17, 2012 7:33:56 AM

Plenty of ins and outs, HDMI, Component, Optical, standard composite ports.
!